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College Major-Down to work hard - Page 3

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by highball View Post
Good points re: prop trading. You have to be very careful to set yourself up with the right credentials to avoid getting stuck as just "the IT guy".

I would advise against anyone straight out of college looking to work for Bloomberg. I interviewed there at the end of college and was not impressed with the personnel and the pay was crap. I felt I had a stellar GPA, engineering degree from a top 15 school, etc. and got turned down for a job that I later found out was basically answering phones. Now within 3 years I'm making 3x the salary they were offering with infinitely more advancement potential and great credentials for bschool.
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I agree that you may want to avoid being pigeon holed into a position that offers little respect from your peers/colleagues.

As far as Bloomberg goes, that have some positions which are very well paid and that are perfect for people who arent really social butterflies.

I think the job you're referring to is called 'Analytics' and that is where they sort out the people who are going to move on to start selling terminals. Its extremely technically oriented, so you need experience dealing with technical difficulties before you begin selling the terminals.

I'm not sure if they have alot of advancement potential, but they are highly respected in the field and most companies really appreciate that the experiences at Bloomberg are intensely focused.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post
As far as Bloomberg goes...

I think part of my problem was I was young and impressionable and relied too much on the recruiter at my school who didn't communicate the job description well enough to me. I should have done more homework, but that being said once I got there I was not impressed with the culture or the people I met with. A good lesson nonetheless: do your homework before your interviews, and make sure you click with the culture and the team before pursuing/accepting an offer.

Anyway, sorry for the off topic bits. Hope this thread has helped the OP figure out what his next steps might be.
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valor View Post
Words of caution:
Most undergraduate degrees in the sciences and engineering(math physics bio chem almost all engineering) are not sufficient to progress in their fields. You will need a Masters or a PHD to find work in these fields. I would also venture to say some soft sciences/humanities (soc, philosophy, history,english) are not sufficient without a PHD if you want to stay in the field.

To progress in science, an MS or PhD is par for the course. Absolutely 100%

BUT, I know very very very few engineers with an advanced degree in engineering. . . unless they are a professor. I know far more engineers with professional degrees (JD or MBA) because they wanted to transition out of engineering.
post #34 of 59
Thread Starter 
I think this is what I am going to do: In high school I did very well in German class. My school offers a dual major of German and International Affairs. I'm not sure what sort of career oppurtunities are out there for this combo, but I do know that I love the German culture and would not mind spending months if not years in Germany. Any input?
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
To progress in science, an MS or PhD is par for the course. Absolutely 100%

BUT, I know very very very few engineers with an advanced degree in engineering. . . unless they are a professor. I know far more engineers with professional degrees (JD or MBA) because they wanted to transition out of engineering.

Very few of the top end engineering firms will accept an engineer without a masters degree.

There is little or no growth potential if you have some random BS in engineering at engineering firms, so many candidates decide to move into other fields.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizen View Post
I think this is what I am going to do: In high school I did very well in German class. My school offers a dual major of German and International Affairs. I'm not sure what sort of career oppurtunities are out there for this combo, but I do know that I love the German culture and would not mind spending months if not years in Germany. Any input?

If you want to get into government this is definitely an option. There are also think tanks you can work for, possibly consulting. This also keeps the door to law school very open if you want to do that.
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
I'd advise against following what the people in this thread advise, look at how boring the life of the average law/finance/it monkey is, do you really want that for yourself cause you'll have a better starting salary? Unless you have a real passion for these fields (it happens, I know people like that and they're HAPPY not just well paid) stay the fuck away from this mind-numbing life. I know it sounds like a bunch of counterculture bullshit but being lured into an unhappy life by a decent salary isn't what I'd call a good plan. Disregard this if, like I said, you have a real passion for one of these fields (say you love programming by all means become a programmer).

I agree with this sentiment. But I'll add: if you do decide to pursue that folklore major because it is your passion in life, don't be surprised when you can't find a job without further education in a prestigious program.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post
So which is better-- taking a worthless undergrad degree and having to do a master's to get any long-term value from it, or first studying something you're actually good at and deciding later where you want to do a master's?

Neither. Choose something that you're passionate about and figure out a way to make money doing it.
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valor View Post
Very few of the top end engineering firms will accept an engineer without a masters degree.

There is little or no growth potential if you have some random BS in engineering at engineering firms, so many candidates decide to move into other fields.

Which engineering firms are you referring to?
post #39 of 59
You should major in Trad studies
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by clotheshorse69 View Post
When most kids say they're taking a year off, that means they're really not coming back (dropping out)
I left and came back, realised I hated it, left and now I wish I'd stuck around; sucked it up and gotten something, anything! Unless you are extremely lucky,slave wage bullshit is all you're going to have available as far as work in most cities. This also depends on who you know in some (few) cases. I suggest thinking very hard about the things you'd like to accomplish within your life time: a home, financial security, children... Sure they all can be attained.The difference however between say an apartment, a towering inferno of debt, living paycheck to paycheck, etc and a comfortable life in the suburbs typically is in direct correlation to the amount of education a certain person has. At my job, the people with degrees, even tactless arrogant idiots get to make decisions... it is of little consequence how hard you work, or how much you know about something, the people in charge have degrees... they are allowed to make mistakes, someone without one is expendable, replace-able, by all practical definitions a cog in a well oiled machine. If a comfortable life were like say..... fishing, a college degree is your only way of acquiring a license. I have no idea what fields are in demand, or what degrees open what doors, or even what makes a particular school better than another... I do know leaving college for anything other than some type of service (peace corps,americorps,mission work, etc) is the easiest way towards mediocrity... unless you're parents are willing to pay for this vacation you're taking from college. I dropped out of college... 6 months later I had a statement arriving every month I was unable. It was the beginning of a cycle, I was stuck in a lease, I was making 'decent' money, I was moderately comfortable, yet incredibly loathsome. Unless you are ok with mediocrity, you will make you feel 'less than' perpetually. Make damn sure this 'break' is something you can afford. As far as what you ought to pursue, don't let money be your motivating factor... also don't get caught up in the idea of finding something you're 100% passionate about. In my experience there is no such thing as the perfect field of study,the perfect career, you have to find something that challenges you, maybe even pisses you off and go after it. Let your career be the kind of thing where the brass ring is just barely out of reach until you retire, then its yours and you've got something to stand back and be proud of. I couldn't see myself being happy in a cubicle, making money for other people, managing something never creating anything, or solving anything. each day a carbon copy of the day before; stare at something, listen to something,pretend to enjoy something. If you can't find something that you're happy with 75% of the time, supplement that extra bit of contentment with service. I said a bunch, but I am 24, married,in (a small ammount by modern standards) debt, unsatisfied with my 'career' , trying as hard as I can to find an outlet for the frustrations involved with being an 8 digit number employed by a multi-national corporation. again, don't take a break... spend a semester taking classes you know you'll enjoy and pass easily if you have to college credit is college credit... don't quit dude.
post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirSuturesALot View Post
Which engineering firms are you referring to?

I'm also curious as to which ones he is referring to.
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by limester816 View Post
You'll make the most out of college with an undergraduate business degree in finance.
Highly quantitative PhD. majors (mathematics, physics, ect.) dominate the finance field, not finance majors (unless it is a highly Quantitative one).
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by legit View Post
I'm also curious as to which ones he is referring to.

+1
post #44 of 59
I'd listen to robbie.
post #45 of 59
I dont agree with the 'its who you know' part. I find that often even if you do know someone, you still need to be qualified. With so many people under employed or unemployed there is no excuse for hiring someone who is under qualified for the job. This means that hiring someone because they somehow know you isnt going to fly with your superiors. Not only that but there are many nepotism rules in place at many large corps that its tough for relatives to be key in placing you somewhere. This wasnt the case 5+ years ago in my understanding. In fact many companies require their management to disclose any knowledge of family members or relatives working for them.
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