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Appropriate to tuck tie into shirt - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Quote:
The double breasted suit is actually considered less formal than the single breasted suit. The cherished DB may be more chic than an SB, but it is less formal.
That's interesting. I would have thought that a double-breasted suit would be more formal than a two-piece single-breasted suit, but perhaps more informal than a three-piece SB. I know that a DB dinner jacket is less formal than an SB one, but the latter is worn with a vest or cummerbund.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Quote:
The double breasted suit is actually considered less formal than the single breasted suit. The cherished DB may be more chic than an SB, but it is less formal.
I know that a DB dinner jacket is less formal than an SB one, but the latter is worn with a vest or cummerbund.
I was unaware of both of these conventions, I had always thought it the other way around. Is there a historical precedent for this, or is just 'one of those things'?
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Is there a historical precedent for this, or is just 'one of those things'?
Don't most accounts say that the Duke of Windsor created the DB dinner jacket as a more casual alternative to the standard SB, since the former didn't require a vest or cummerbund? Sorta along the lines of the softer pleat-front shirt versus the older bib-front model? I may be way off my rocker, but that's my guess.
post #19 of 28
i'd say a db is slightly less formal than single breasted simply because of the amount of buttons. buttons= sporty to my eyes (even if the buttons on the db are just decoration.) think of how a one-button black suit looks more formal than a four-button one. anyway, gregory, i think that my comments were at least slightly based on this notion that the only guys i see wearing ties without a suit/sportcoat are bank tellers, car salesmen, etc... usually young guys who'd rather be wearing jeans and a t-shirt but are forced to wear a tie for their job. i wear a suit most days but almost never wear a tie unless i feel the need to dress up. wearing a tie with slacks and a sweater would make me feel like mr. rogers. also, you mention that that the suit no tie look is a fairly modern invention as though it were a bad thing. we live in modern times. why base our principles of dress on what men did in the '30s? my grandfather was a great dresser, but i'm not him, and i don't feel it necessary to dress according to the rules of his or any other generation. finished ranting...
post #20 of 28
I should think a three piece suit should be somewhere on that list. A totally matching three piece is most likely a formal piece whereas one with an unmatching vest might be on a lower tier. Also when the three items all don't match is probably in the lower spectrum of formality, i.e. "casualwear."
post #21 of 28
You guys are over-analyzing. Dressing is an art, not a science. Disregard all the rules. Forget about what ranks as more formal. Go with what feels right and looks good at the time. This is the only real "rule" that I'd abide by. If people were following rules all the time and worry about what's "appropriate," there would be no innovation. Think about the guys who cut the tails off their coat and invented the tuxedo.
post #22 of 28
I completely agree with Mike C. If you adhere too closely to rules, you will always look presentable, but never look stylish. I think that it's better to take a chance, sometimes crashing and burning, but other times really getting it on.
post #23 of 28
You mean the immigrants in England.  
post #24 of 28
The tie in shirt works only if you are Detective Stabler from Law and Order SVU! Ive never done it myself, no need to really!
post #25 of 28
A tie with a shirt looks less formal, less stylish, and less respectful than a shirt and nice jacket sans tie.
Wearing a shirt and tie but no jacket to me screams of forced fake formality, like a teenager being directed by his parents or a low-level employee being directed by his manager to "dress up" by wearing a tie but determined not to make an ounce of effort beyond what's required.
It also smacks to me of faux respect, of the sort put on by hospitality or customer service workers -- kind of akin to calling a customer "sir" while everything else about your attitude oozes indifference or disrespect.
[Recognizing, of course, that not everyone working in those fields fits the stereotypes.]
post #26 of 28
(tie + shirt) - jacket = cubicle (though I do sometimes do it under a sweater)
post #27 of 28
no jacket --> no tie
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo
(tie + shirt) - jacket = cubicle

(though I do sometimes do it under a sweater)
short sleeve shirt would really pull off the look
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