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NY Times: Why Designer Clothes Cost So Much - Page 5

post #61 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post
FUCK YOU, you ignorant self absorbed brat.

Wow. Maybe this has something to do with why your store closed?

I have a ton of respect for anyone who has a skilled trade. They can do things I can't. They know things I don't. But if they don't treat me with respect - even when I say something about their product that shows my ignorance - why would I want to give them any money?
post #62 of 293
1) It's very difficult to run any type of small business venture. And the part nobody gets about it until you do it yourself is that if you are running the place, you get paid LAST. You have to pay for the wholesale product. You have to pay the rent/utilities. You have to pay for the employees. You have to pay the damn Federal Government and the obscene worker's comp ripoff fees. Then you sell the product and the money comes in... and you hope it covers all the above costs. If it does and goes positive, THEN (and only then) do you make any money.

2) The internet does offer the opportunity to bypass the large retailers and the markups along the way. I just bought a $2,000 item (retail) that I could have bought in my local store... I bought it online for $700. Exact same product, bought direct from the manufacturer. It hasn't happened in apparel completely... yet.
post #63 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post
Harris Tweed by the cut piece at a jobber like Tip Top might $24.00 a yard because it's older stock or someone who had stock went out of business. If you want current cut piece goods try $100.00 + a yard.
This may be what you have to pay, Mauro, but it's not the market price for Harris Tweed. The current price for Harris tweed by the yard at retail is less than 50$. Available worldwide. You are telling me that the US wholesale price is twice that? In fact as recently as a few years ago you could get it cheaper than $24 per yard at wholesale. In the first part of the decade it went below $15 per yard but the price has since recovered. There is no such thing as "current" Harris Tweed. The patterns are traditional. If you want a small run in an unusual pattern or some special dyeing technique used then of course you will have to pay more.
post #64 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by blynch View Post
Was I the only one surprised that the retailer mark up was only 2.5x? I figured it would be more like 5x. At 2.5x, you are losing money on anything over 60% off and 60% off seems pretty typical nowadays.
This, I suspect is the nub of the issue. At full retail margins are often pretty plump. The problem is that very little stock gets shifted at anything like full retail.
post #65 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfred View Post
2) The internet does offer the opportunity to bypass the large retailers and the markups along the way. I just bought a $2,000 item (retail) that I could have bought in my local store... I bought it online for $700. Exact same product, bought direct from the manufacturer. It hasn't happened in apparel completely... yet.
Most brands won't sell to-commerce sites that undercut brick & mortar businesses by large percentages. I find this hard to believe because the brand you refer to would receive a lot of product returns from frustrated brick & mortar stores. Clothing retailers carrying the same brands watch each others price strategies like hawks.
post #66 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by borderline View Post

Photos would be interesting...

+1
post #67 of 293
You guys should convince Mike from Epaulet to come chime in here..
post #68 of 293
lostinthesupermarket,

I haven't recieved my Harris Tweed book or any other companies that the company who represents them. I don't have a price guide so I can be off base. I would love to buy some fabric from harris tweed by the piece and not just cut lenght. That would be nice.

The jobbers who are distributors for the states mark the fabric to cover thier costs so buying from the mill is the smartest thing. I can't always do that. So if a mill works with a jobber that jobs it out to the states the price is doubled what you might pay direct or from the agent in Europe.

fred- actually I am a VERY nice guy and treat my customers with respect. Sometime that same respect is not returned.
I am happy to hear you respect the industry but the fact remains A LOT of people don't and those are the ones who spew retarded shit on the internet.

Like I have said before " You might not like something but it doesn't mean that others don't find that same piece attractive" and just because you don't like something doesn't mean its crap.
It's that thought process that drives me nuts and it's that thought process which poo-poos brands that don't deserve unneeded critisim(sp).

The internet allows people to get have assed information that they can take and form an opinion that really doesn't hold water but because the person has a voice people who don't know as much might take that information as fact and make real uneducated decisions.

I am not a huge fan of the internet unless porn is involved. I think the internet is runing fashion and stiffling a lot of peoples creativity. It's a slap in the face for the truly creative people out there that their product is being knocked off and sold before the original creators collection is made.

Kelvin- why would Mike want to Chime in??? I don't think that would be smart. He is doing well and makes good product. He could say something that doesn't jive right and might be attacked. It's not worth it.

Best,
Mauro
post #69 of 293
you hate the internet but run a business that does all its business online with a huge proportion of sales coming from this forum and through which you do a large amount of your marketing? i understand that you probably know more about the clothing industry than most people here having been involved personally in it for so long, but you don't make sense dude.
post #70 of 293
mauro, Well it just seems like he's been making a very high quality product with good fabrics, all made in NY so he probably has some good insight into the whole process. Maybe he doesn't want to reveal too much though
post #71 of 293
Imaozedong--lol, I know right. I am trying to ween off the internet. I don't want to have to buy any product. I will use my blog and online shop to promote other peoples stuff.
sometimes it's a damned if you do and damned if you don't situation. If you are going to be successful in retail you have to "keep up with the Joanes".

So I will write and promote people like Mike from "Epaulet" and the Context kids. I have lost the desire of retail. they are on top of their game and ready to pounce. I just want to focus on tailoring and Wolf Vs Goat that's what drives me right now.

Kelvin,
Mike does use good fabrics and his stuff is made in the NY. We use a lot of the same places to source fabric and we use some of the same factories.
Everyone knows I get steamd up over certain things and have NO problem speaking my mind. I don't want Mike to be like me or make the mistakes I have made.


Best,
Mauro
post #72 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post
I am not a huge fan of the internet unless porn is involved. I think the internet is runing fashion and stiffling a lot of peoples creativity. It's a slap in the face for the truly creative people out there that their product is being knocked off and sold before the original creators collection is made.
Is the Internet truly ruining fashion or is it simply ruining fashion as you know and love it? The emergence of the Internet and "Fast Fashion" has increasingly caused fashion to become more "bottom up" as opposed to "top down". Stores like H&M, Zara, Forever 21, and Uniqlo are offering the average person more fashionable & well fitting looks at a reasonable price than what was previously available. For the average person, this can be viewed as a good thing. While these clothing outlets may often copy designs from higher end designers, as they grow bigger they will likely hire more in-house design talent and do more collaborations with famous designers (i.e. Uniqlo +J). Overtime such outlets have the potential to become more influential than just mere copycats. The situation nearly seems analogous to what has occurred in the stereo equipment marketplace over the last several decades. There used to be a large marketplace for somewhat higher end stereo equipment in the US. But as the marketplace became more globalized, Japanese electronics makers transformed the masses view of stereo equipment from something special into a passe thing that you buy for cheap at discount retailers such as Best Buy. Today the higher end stereo equipment marketplace still exists and has plenty of innovation, but it has become a niche area with higher end equipment and fewer customers. Many large cities that used to have numerous stereo shops now have only one or two such shops remaining. Anyway, I keep wondering if a similar trend is happening in fashion industry. Is there a trend towards these large fast fashion retailers grabbing an increasing share of the marketplace at the expense of the mid range designers? And if so, will there be a move towards fewer small shops which sell mostly higher end goods? Seems like an opportunity could exist for someone thinking about this in a more positive light.
post #73 of 293
coming next week: groceries: what's the big fucking deal?
post #74 of 293
BB1,
you bring up a good point but for every McQueen or Thom Brown there are thousands of people who will never be that caliber. They might hold postions at Gap or Abercrombie ( and get paid very well)but they will NEVER have the talent held by the two mentioned above. With that being said those people need to steal others ideas and that's a sad thing.
"Fast fashion" is crap and always will be crap. That's why certain designers like McQueen would never touch it no matter what the pay check was.

Your kinda right. I know and love fashion is an odd way. I do embrace technology only if it aids tradition but the computer could kill tailoring as an art if people don't embrace the old way of making things.
The computer or internet kills a lot of originality of a collection. In a couple months people will want spring 11 but fall 10 hasn't delivered. The consumer should be excited for fall 10 arriving not Spring 11 and that's what the internet does.

I read the Hedi Salame ( sp) interview he did not to long ago. if you haven't read it do so ( someone please post it). he gives an interesting take on the internet and fashion.

I do think old school in the fact I appreciate the sewing/tailoring trade and don't want to see it die. I also think the public should be excited about a trend and grow it. Not make it a fad ."in and out" fashion to me blows.
I appreciate fine fabrics and notions and think the people who make them have the right to earn a living. Not computerized mills with someone with an IT degree running it.

I use three suiting factories to make my Wolf Vs Goat MTM program. All three should be around for a while but factories are closing everyday all over because of "fast fashion" and companies out sourcing their product. That includes Japanese and Italian factories.
These big companies like H&M and Zara are bastardizing true fashion and talent. So a man or a woman can have close to the real thing but not really. If you can't afford it don't buy and don't steal it from someone who worked very hard to create something special. Didn't we learn anything from this recession??

These are my thoughts and I can be a little off my rocker at times but a little intergrity goes a long way in my book. Zara and companies like them lack any real values and only care about their bottom line.


Best,
Mauro
post #75 of 293
Well I don't know from fast fashion. We don't have an H&M or Zara anywhere around here. But the internet has opened up "fashion" for people like me who live in Bumfuck, Nowhere who would otherwise have no options other than Macy's, American Eagle, Express, and possibly J. Crew if we're lucky.

Hey Mauro, are you coming to Greensboro to go to Cone Mills University? Hit me up... I'll show you around.
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