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NY Times: Why Designer Clothes Cost So Much - Page 20

post #286 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post
Chrono or someone said it best pages back. If you find value in something and are willing to pay "X" then its worth it to you.

That's how I do it. I have no idea how manufacturing and designing clothes works so the best I could do is take pretty wild guesses at what I'm paying for.
post #287 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
Isn't it relatively logical to think that looking at the WAYWT or recent purchase thread you'll get a list of what each member participating in those threads considers the best brands (i.e. what they buy and wear). In my case that would be something like: Rick Owens Ann Demeulemeester Maison Martin Margiela Lanvin Cloak (RIP) Helmut Lang (RIP) Junya Watanabe Comme des Garcons YSL etc
If you ever get bored of the balla life, feel free to switch wardrobes with me
post #288 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
I don't "compromise" or replace one article with another one from another designer, I get what I want and it is mostly about specific pieces from specific designers in specific materials. I don't care all that much about "quality" (its gotta meet some standards but I do buy some stuff that is, for example, very fragile) except if it is part of the brand mythos and thus gives me some sort of psychological satisfaction.

This is also me in a nutshell, except that I will also look for specific types of construction in specific types of pieces - for example, flatlock stitching on henleys, because 1) I like the look, and 2) I like the nod towards the construction on the original 2 or 3 button military undershirts they were based on. I don't really care about quality, but my lifestyle is a little more rough and tumble than Fuuma's, so I require that my clothes have a little bit of durability, or else I'd never get to wear them, though there are some pieces that I bought more because they were beautiful than because I'd ever have the occasion to wear them.

Clothing is not art, (though others may disagree,) but self-expression is artistic, and there is so much more to this than "quality", for most people. To try to describe the relationship between value and quality is an exercise in
futility.
post #289 of 293
^^that's correct. I to tend to buy and make more durable stuff. I do appreciate danty fabrics but for the price tag for me it seems like a waste because I will ruin it and if I don't my daughter will.

geeti- try my shirts when they arrive and you will be happy. I wear my workpants a shit ton and actually do yard work in them and they hold up and when I wash them and pair them up with a nice shirt or sweater I get loads of compliements. The only excpection to my rule is sweaters.
A fine gauge cashmere sweater or cotton is a sweet thing to own.
post #290 of 293
I would personally find more value in paying $200 dollars for a tee shirt (Not that I have...yet) than $400 on a button down these days. I spent most of my twenties purchasing from brands like Helmut Lang, Marc Jacobs, Jil Sander, Burberry, Dries, Miu Miu and Prada circa 97-02 and never feeling comfortable in the clothes. Too fragile and the necessity to Dry Clean was a pain. I've owned too may torqued Helmut Lang knits, pasta sauce stained Prada shirts and shrunken Dior belly knits too go back down that road. I'm far more comfortable dressing down, cotton basics like jersey, canvas and denim are now my go to fabrics, if it can't be thrown in a washer and dryer it's not for me.
post #291 of 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rye GB View Post
I would personally find more value in paying $200 dollars for a tee shirt (Not that I have...yet) than $400 on a button down these days.

I spent most of my twenties purchasing from brands like Helmut Lang, Marc Jacobs, Jil Sander, Burberry, Dries, Miu Miu and Prada circa 97-02 and never feeling comfortable in the clothes. Too fragile and the necessity to Dry Clean was a pain. I've owned too may torqued Helmut Lang knits, pasta sauce stained Prada shirts and shrunken Dior belly knits too go back down that road. I'm far more comfortable dressing down, cotton basics like jersey, canvas and denim are now my go to fabrics, if it can't be thrown in a washer and dryer it's not for me.

I was also buying a lot of this brands, at roughly the same time (well, that was what everyone was buying then, so...) I think that the difference between us is that I consciously chose to not worry about the pricetag when I was caring for it. Pasta and grease stains got some major, powerful, detergents. I still have a couple of moleskin Jil Sander shirt jackets from back then, a Burberry Prosum double-breasted cropped peacoat Pre-Bailey (apparently, I am a Menichetti fan, etc... that are all beat to shit and look good with worn in jeans and Chucks. I think that a good piece of clothing has a full lifetime, starting from runway perfect (even if it's all ripped and shredded, it looks new) to "throw on for the weekend breakfast" casual.
post #292 of 293
LOL... Ihave that stuuf too! I am with Rye. Though I do enjoy dressing up. Having a child and getting down and dirty I need some comfortable rugged clothes.
I am finding knits ( tee shirt) for a nice quality are getting very expensive and with me being so rigid on quality thats why I haven't made any tees yet.
post #293 of 293
Retail prices are a joke, pure hustle!
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