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post #25036 of 26303

I have loved the 993 Porsche's for years but haven't seen one's interior in a while to know if it could be a forever car.  I think that is my problem with choosing forever car right now is that I have not had the opportunity to potentially own one so I haven't looked into many cars I love in pictures.

 

Here are some items I would want in a forever car though: manual trans, 2-door, makes you smile whenever you get in the damned thing.

 

I will say I was never tired of my GTI.  It had some problems that I paid to fix and the seats sucked over long distances but damn if I didn't smile every time I got in it.  Add to the fact that VW is not bringing any 2-door Golfs to America anymore that it may be a cheap car on my list of forever cars as well.

 

Contenders hopefully in the future: Porsche 993 (yellow as it was the memory I have as a child), Jaguar XK120 (white or black over red or British green over tan), BMW 2002 Tii (maybe even a pain jane 2002), Older GTI...there are probably more.

post #25037 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post

Yeah. I know what you are saying. Better modded than forgotten or stripped for parts .

Friends know how reluctant i am to
alter it. As it is, it was my dream car.

Time to think. Will keep you posted.

 

Maybe rather than worrying about its originality and rarity, the question should be what do you want this car to be?  Originality, regardless of rarity, isn't for everyone.  I'm sure if its as rare as you say, there are already some very low mileage, all original condition, non-modded cars for people to admire as museum quality/show piece examples of how the cars left the factory.

 

As someone pointed out you rescued the vehicle, and its getting to be on the higher mileage side... so its unlikely to have the value or appeal of an all original super low mileage car,...perhaps unless you actually did a full nut and bolt restoration.

 

I"m big into originality, all I've done on the Porsche was paint protection film and change the amber side markers to the euro clear ones (but I still have the amber ones in case I wanted to pop them back in some day.  And on our other fun car, even though its 27 years old, all that's been done to it is paint protection film and more modern tires.  

 

Life's to short not to drive and enjoy the car the way you would want it to be (or at least as close to that vision as possible).    

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post
 

I have loved the 993 Porsche's for years but haven't seen one's interior in a while to know if it could be a forever car.  I think that is my problem with choosing forever car right now is that I have not had the opportunity to potentially own one so I haven't looked into many cars I love in pictures.

 

Here are some items I would want in a forever car though: manual trans, 2-door, makes you smile whenever you get in the damned thing.

 

I will say I was never tired of my GTI.  It had some problems that I paid to fix and the seats sucked over long distances but damn if I didn't smile every time I got in it.  Add to the fact that VW is not bringing any 2-door Golfs to America anymore that it may be a cheap car on my list of forever cars as well.

 

Contenders hopefully in the future: Porsche 993 (yellow as it was the memory I have as a child), Jaguar XK120 (white or black over red or British green over tan), BMW 2002 Tii (maybe even a pain jane 2002), Older GTI...there are probably more.

+1

 

I Love the 993, but Mrs. Dino likes the crisper lines and more upright headlamps of the late 80's 911s and 964s.  The interior of 911s starts to change with the intro of the 964 (it had been largely the same other than changes to stitching pattern on seats, size of AC vents, and the steering wheel from 1974-89).  With the 964 they finally attempted to give it modern HVAC controls, rather than 3 separate controls in different parts of the car for heat, ventilation, and AC.  Although the cars are older, and depending on what you are used to (be it with older cars you've driven, or modern cars that spoil us with amenities that didn't exist back in the day), the 993 cockpit is a pretty comfortable place to be.  It has a conventional upright driving position with great visibility, rather than having to practically lay down and deal with some loss of visibility that comes with some Italian cars.  I think the only downside to its interior, would be if you lived in a really hot climate, the old air cooled 911s don't have a reputation for having really strong air conditioning (in fact its pretty weak in the 1980s and earlier cars).   Still, if a forever car isn't necessarily a daily driver, I'm sure you could make it work.

 

I'm liking your list of possible forever cars a lot.  I thought most people would choose fairly modern cars, so its interesting to see you've chosen some very vintage cars!   :fistbump: 

post #25038 of 26303
The 993 is in the sweet spot of being as modern as possible while still staying a classic.

There are few things more beautiful than a pristine vintage Jag - you just have to make sure you have the wherewithal to constantly be fixing it

One of my b-school buddies had a red E type convertible that he restored himself. He totally blew away all the preppy guys with their new BMW's and Audis. We'd drive to outdoor parties with the understanding that I'd have to find another way home if he took a girl home in that car. And ALL of them wanted a ride. Can't tell you how many times I saw him driving off with one, even two girls on top of each other in that passenger seat

But then you'd pop the trunk and it was full to the brim with tools and spare parts. He couldn't go a hundred miles without needing to pull over and wrench on something. He was fine with that - he was a former Air Force mechanic - but I would have sold that thing in a month if it was mine. But it was clearly his forever car....I haven't seen him in years but I bet he still has it
post #25039 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

There are few things more beautiful than a pristine vintage Jag - you just have to make sure you have the wherewithal to constantly be fixing it

One of my b-school buddies had a red E type convertible that he restored himself

But then you'd pop the trunk and it was full to the brim with tools and spare parts. He couldn't go a hundred miles without needing to pull over and wrench on something. He was fine with that - he was a former Air Force mechanic - but I would have sold that thing in a month if it was mine. But it was clearly his forever car....I haven't seen him in years but I bet he still has it

Jags definitely have the reputation for being a car not to buy if you aren't going to wrench it yourself.  When my Dad was buying Porsches in the 1980's one if his friends was buying Jags.  He would keep and XJ6 for 3 or 4 years and trade it for the next one, until he finally bought hsi dream car around 1986/1987, a V12 XJS.  He absolutely loved that car, but told my Dad unless you are going to work on it yourself, never buy a Jag.  He once brought us down to his garage and showed us all his equipment for working on his toys, he had a hoist to remove the engine, several Snap on tool boxes, and lots of repair manuals etc.

 

Interestingly, one of our regular attendees at our local cars and coffee who has a 997.1S, also has a 1973 E-Type convertible that he bought in the 1980s.  It had been damaged, and he bought it, and then did a full nut and bolt restoration on it himself.  He said, once he sorted the car, contrary to its reputation its been very reliable for him.  He still makes all the Lucas Electrical & British car jokes, but he says other than the paint is starting to look a bit old in places (now that the paint is 25+ years old) he hasn't had any major issues.  Maybe he's just lucky, who knows.  I hope telling this story doesn't jinx him.

 

Below is a photo of his E-Type at one of our local meets.  For Jag experts out there, those are the smaller '72 and earlier style chrome bumpers rather than the later big rubber bumpers.   @HRoi PS the owner of the Turbo S, just took delivery of his GT4 a few weeks ago. He chose the same Sapphire blue as yours.  

 

post #25040 of 26303
Those e-types are def a classic but the rare time I see one I always think of this bit
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nviB2Rlm-uY
post #25041 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Maybe rather than worrying about its originality and rarity, the question should be what do you want this car to be?  Originality, regardless of rarity, isn't for everyone.  I'm sure if its as rare as you say, there are already some very low mileage, all original condition, non-modded cars for people to admire as museum quality/show piece examples of how the cars left the factory.

As someone pointed out you rescued the vehicle, and its getting to be on the higher mileage side... so its unlikely to have the value or appeal of an all original super low mileage car,...perhaps unless you actually did a full nut and bolt restoration.

I"m big into originality,  

I bought this car with the intent to build an intimidating street/track day weapon. With grand plans to upgrade the gearbox and Diffs to 2005-6 6spd, bolt pattern to 114.3 swap. Cusco diffs , Hks Hypermax coilovers. And a plethora of engine mods. The goal being 400hp at the wheels. Carbon hood,(orig has bondo, so bonnet pins require a new hood, and bolt on over fenders. . . But. It has grown on me in stock form. I'm not motivated by value. There are other cars for that. This became my daily by necessity. And now it's starting to give up on me. Meaning whether it gets a makeover.or replaced. It needs to be taken off the road soon. And no matter what i do with it? I'm going to need a new daily. Just hope this one holds out a little longer. A garage is coming soon. .
post #25042 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by double00 View Post
 


toyota land cruiser. thought very hard about picking up an early 00s model last year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SirReveller View Post

Wait- was the forever car also in the realistic realm of affordability? I assumed no. Hence, for 00 I'd humbly modify to

http://www.trucktrend.com/news/163-news130514-icon-toyota-fj44-four-door-for-sale/
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

Good call on the Land cruisers. My family had a '79 (iirc) back in the day. My god that thing was a mountain goat. But it would give you a concussion riding in the jump seats in the back
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

I've ridden in UN land cruisers in Uganda over some pretty shitty roads. It's not much better inside...

 

Everyone gets the fuck out of their way though!

I'd have to go with Icon's "TLC" shop version of the FZJ80 with the LS# V8, But until I can step up to a land cruiser, I've got an 08 4runner V8 limited, slowly updating suspension and whatever else I can so that it can be a forever truck. I'd love to pick a GTI/Golf R for a runabout/grocery getter but I dont know if you could call that a forever car  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRYXMHoylzk

post #25043 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post


I bought this car with the intent to build an intimidating street/track day weapon. With grand plans to upgrade the gearbox and Diffs to 2005-6 6spd, bolt pattern to 114.3 swap. Cusco diffs , Hks Hypermax coilovers. And a plethora of engine mods. The goal being 400hp at the wheels. Carbon hood,(orig has bondo, so bonnet pins require a new hood, and bolt on over fenders. . . But. It has grown on me in stock form. I'm not motivated by value. There are other cars for that. This became my daily by necessity. And now it's starting to give up on me. Meaning whether it gets a makeover.or replaced. It needs to be taken off the road soon. And no matter what i do with it? I'm going to need a new daily. Just hope this one holds out a little longer. A garage is coming soon. .

Well, maybe the issue then becomes whether to do a make over (and whether that can be done easily in stages on weekends) so as to keep the car driveable for most of the work week.  

 

Or does it make sense to get newer lower mileage daily, but one that you will enjoy at least as much as this one if not more, but something with far fewer needs.  I always think about a statement one of the techs who works on my car, told me they always tell people who are considering cars in various states of condition (from really great shape, to needs a lot of work that they might wrench themselves).  Do you want a car that you can drive for the next several seasons with just some basic service, or do you want a project car?  He said a lot of hobbyists who have a 9-5 job, who buy a project car end up not driving it for at least several seasons (to a few years) if it needs a bunch of work, just because they are limited to nights and weekend (and that's when family obligations don't keep them out of the garage).  It seems you get to work on cars all week long, and granted it may seem different to work on your own car and maybe build your dream vehicle vs. that of others...but maybe after the work you have put into this one it might be a nice change to have a car needing less work, and simply having more time to drive it since you wouldn't be doing as much work on it (maybe consider how many weekends or nights you put into repainting/bodywork etc). Or maybe for you it would be a mix something newer and fun that you would do some limited mods to and just enjoy. 

 

A lot of guys I know, like having something fairly modern that needs only basic service, that might get a few mods, but won't take a lot of their weekends, nights etc, so that they can easily use their free time to go drives with friends, or do car club driving events, cars and coffee etc.   Wishing you luck with whatever the next step is.

post #25044 of 26303
Gonna drop this here due to Telsa.

What's the latest scoop on his whole house battery? I want one.
post #25045 of 26303
Get the price down and you got a dirty bargain winter vehicle. ie all fund$ dedicated to a sick May-Oct sports car.

http://www.autotrader.ca/result/AdDetailInfo.aspx?srcID=5&frnID=28316744

Only question o/s: just how stank is that interior? Lol.
post #25046 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Gonna drop this here due to Telsa.

What's the latest scoop on his whole house battery? I want one.

The Powerwall is basically load balancing electrical energy consumption.

The sun doesn't shine all day, and when it does, most people are out of the house and at work. It's a means to store energy for when you come home or wake up and want electricity that was either delivered via solar or during off-peak off-the-grid hours.

You'll need an electrician to do the installation (DC/AC inverters, charging spots for your cars if need be, dryers, HVAC, induction cooktops, etc.), but you should come out ahead within 5 years or so.

I've been telling my friends this for 5+ years. Tesla isn't a car company. It's an energy company.
post #25047 of 26303
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirReveller View Post

Get the price down and you got a dirty bargain winter vehicle. ie all fund$ dedicated to a sick May-Oct sports car.

http://www.autotrader.ca/result/AdDetailInfo.aspx?srcID=5&frnID=28316744

Only question o/s: just how stank is that interior? Lol.


tongue.gif strip the interior. Race seats and black speaker box carpet diy doortrims, used decent carpet cleaned and spray painted black. Semi race look but comfortable. Outside would get a Cray Arctic camo with blacked out bumpers.
-taped up windows and trim. A few beers and a paint gun. cheers.gif

If they can prove the mech stuff is sound? That could be a lot of fun.

Edit:and yellow light bulbs, yellow fog lights. Yup, would totally roll that winter badassery . nod[1].gif
Edited by Thrift Vader - 9/20/16 at 3:35am
post #25048 of 26303
Oh spot on Thrift. I woulda just draped a poncho a homeless guy in Cancun gave me over the driver's seat! Lol

The fact a fulltime mechanic rebuilt this sucker has to be an extra plus.
post #25049 of 26303
Agreed.
Looks like a lump of coal. Diamond?
Poncho is a bonus.
If cosmetic and comforts are open to your tastes? It has a lot to give. Cool find.
post #25050 of 26303
The load balancing is secondary to me as I just want it for electrical outages. I was looking more for comments on the battery itself as I've already looked into the installation. FYI, you don't need all the bolded. A "switch gear" is installed and the change over to alternate power (generator, battery (other companies have them,) etc.) is transparent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post

The Powerwall is basically load balancing electrical energy consumption.

The sun doesn't shine all day, and when it does, most people are out of the house and at work. It's a means to store energy for when you come home or wake up and want electricity that was either delivered via solar or during off-peak off-the-grid hours.

You'll need an electrician to do the installation (DC/AC inverters, charging spots for your cars if need be, dryers, HVAC, induction cooktops, etc.), but you should come out ahead within 5 years or so.

I've been telling my friends this for 5+ years. Tesla isn't a car company. It's an energy company.
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