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Cars We Drive! - Page 1532

post #22966 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

This also popped up recently, probably a terrible idea?
92 BMW 325IC with 170k for 2700. Car makes decent power and has decent reviews. Looks like it was pretty well taken care of. Could have it looked over as well. 

http://boston.craigslist.org/nos/cto/5643881252.html

 

Fair enough, if I were to do it, I'd research the snot out of it first and do a compression test and all that good stuff and do pretty much the mildest thing I could.

Honestly, the point of this is to learn to drive stick on a fun-ish car.  ...

 

I'm finding NA MR2's for like 3500-4500 in reasonable condition. Any cheaper and they're rattle canned or some other crap. 
This is the only one I found that looks like a reasonable cost and it's a barn find with an exhaust leak. 

https://newhaven.craigslist.org/cto/5643885044.html

 

This one looks decent, but is 4500; https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/cto/5573918510.html

 

For 3k, 85 300zx: https://southcoast.craigslist.org/cto/5610651660.html

Funny to see your list of cars are basically the cars that were the somewhat reasonably priced performance/fun cars when i was a teenager.  Some of the kids in my high school had cars such as the 300ZX on your list, the 1st gen MR2, 2nd generation RX7, an 87 Toyota Supra or occasionally were using their parents 3 series BMWs.

 

I have a soft spot for cars of the 80's and 90's, so I always think its great when people keep them going and enjoy them.  A few of my friends and I have at least one older car and they are still fun to use and people always stop us at car events to chat about them or tell us stories about when they or their parents had car X.  

 

I would say, there are definitely things that you would need to look into on cars of this age such as when/if the fuel and brake lines were replaced, and if you don't know find out what the cost would be to do that.  Also, on some of the cars you mention, I personally wouldn't put a lot of money into modding them, as you might only get a fraction of what you put into the mods back when you sell or trade it, but as long as you are aware of that going in then have fun!  

 

My neighbor has a 1st gen Miata that is totally stock, and he loves driving it.  Its really a great car to learn to drive stick on, and maintenance isn't bad on those.  The old 3 series BMW is an interesting option, and it has decent power, but parts will probably run you a heck of a lot more than the Miata.  

 

Yes, there are some great back roads to enjoy in MA once you have mastered driving stick.  We did a nice drive through the back roads of southern, MA last year with 15 other fun cars and had a blast!  Wishing you luck and lots of fun mastering a manual shift car.  

post #22967 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

 

I would say, there are definitely things that you would need to look into on cars of this age such as when/if the fuel and brake lines were replaced, and if you don't know find out what the cost would be to do that.  Also, on some of the cars you mention, I personally wouldn't put a lot of money into modding them, as you might only get a fraction of what you put into the mods back when you sell or trade it, but as long as you are aware of that going in then have fun!  

 

My neighbor has a 1st gen Miata that is totally stock, and he loves driving it.  Its really a great car to learn to drive stick on, and maintenance isn't bad on those.  The old 3 series BMW is an interesting option, and it has decent power, but parts will probably run you a heck of a lot more than the Miata.  

 

Yes, there are some great back roads to enjoy in MA once you have mastered driving stick.  We did a nice drive through the back roads of southern, MA last year with 15 other fun cars and had a blast!  Wishing you luck and lots of fun mastering a manual shift car.  

 

Heh, thanks. That's exactly my thinking right now too.

The BMW looks to be in pretty great shape, but I don't know what it takes to wrench on it. Since it's not a daily driver, I could probably jack it up on the street and look it over. There are also a few mobile mechanics around here so it might be doable.

The miata is on the totally opposite end of the spectrum though. Low power, but also low maintenance and probably cheap if it needs anything. I do find myself drawn to the bimmer because it looks like a fun car, but I honestly don't know what to expect.

 

Here's a quote from the listing for the 325ci: 

Quote:
 This car has been professionally gone over - all new undercoating; new clutch; new short throw transmission; new tires (500 miles); new wheels; all new brakes; upgraded suspension and bushings all around, and a manual top that does not leak. All the door cards/interior panels have been redone and are like brand new. 

 

I emailed the seller and he said a father-son duo in VA rebuilt it together from the ground up. So it might have been a project for them to just do and get working again or such. KBB on the car is like 2k, but they have done a bunch of work to it. I'm sure he'd take it if I offered something in the 2.3-2.5k range, which would be what a miata would set me back as well. I wouldn't be tempted to do anything to this car other than to keep it running though. 

post #22968 of 26371
I don't think the 325 is a good choice for a car to work on or fix. It's not E9x or F3/8x level complex, but the E4x cars are still fairly complicated because of the electronics and the modules. A friend of mine had an LCI E46 and the windows wouldn't go down and we both tried to fix it. It ended up needing a new module that cost ~$400.

They're great cars when they're running, but not so much fun when they're not.
post #22969 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post

I don't think the 325 is a good choice for a car to work on or fix. It's not E9x or F3/8x level complex, but the E4x cars are still fairly complicated because of the electronics and the modules. A friend of mine had an LCI E46 and the windows wouldn't go down and we both tried to fix. It ended up needing a new module that cost ~$400.

They're great cars when they're running, but not so much fun when they're not.

 

Looks like the miata is as highly regarded for a reason haha.

And like I'd mentioned elsewhere, I'd likely only toy with it if I was definitely going to sell my bike. 

My bike will out accelerate just about any car I'll own for the next decade, and probably most cars on the road till atleast 60. 

 

I guess I'm probably better off looking for one of the late NA miata's with the 1.8 engine, huh?

 

@HRoi  @Dino944

 

Just got another email from the bimmer guy.
Timing belt done 10k miles ago. Most engine components are new or refurbished. 

 

Sounds like maybe the engine was swapped? I just asked.


In all likelihood, I'd probably put like... maybe 10-15k miles on the car before I sold it. It also wouldn't be a daily driver since I have another car.

 

Here's the reply: 
 

The new engine was put in at 170,000 miles… It was a rebuilt motor… New timing chain valve springs etc.… The engine has less than 50,000 miles on it… The father and son I bought the car from head way too many projects… Their estimate was that they put $7000 into this car in the engine transmission clutch suspension various other components and interior


Edited by ridethecliche - 6/23/16 at 10:52am
post #22970 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post

It's 'cars we drive', and the recent vibe has been great. There are great ones across all price points. The experience is what matters. None of us on here are Bill Gates.

I'm thinking about a Ford Transit Connect.

Short wheelbase model--should I go with the 2.5L 4 or the Turbo 4?

So sexy

Edited by otc - 6/23/16 at 2:15pm
post #22971 of 26371

These just popped up too:

 

01 Saab 9-3 convertible for 2100: http://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/cto/5616927311.html

 

03 mustang for 2k: http://boston.craigslist.org/nwb/cto/5650121033.html

post #22972 of 26371
E36 BMW's are still great cars. rock solid chassis. i don't suppose you can stretch your budget to an E36 M3, can you? devil.gif

the only drawbacks is that the clutch is a little hard to learn on (the engagement isn't very linear), and if you happen to need a major repair while you own it, you'll be paying more than the 2500 you paid for the car. this one seems to have an extensive service history, which is good. but this father and son duo...i wonder, are they competent to be wrenching on BMW's? did they correctly diagnose everything needed on the car and take care of everything?

i'm leery of Saabs. if you ever need any kind of manufacturer support, well....the manufacturer doesn't exist anymore
post #22973 of 26371

Yeah, I agree with that re: BMW and Saab.

There's a honda prelude listed for 3400 that I think is highly over priced. He said he'd take 2900 today/tomorrow. The car has like 182k miles on it, which is quite a bit. http://boston.craigslist.org/sob/cto/5648976440.html


He was looking at the NADA value which is 4k while the kbb is like 2250. I'd check it out for like 2250, but I'm not really willing to go over it. 

Or I could legit get a shitbox civic that's on its dying breath and learn how to drive that around here for the rest of the summer and get rid of it after. Could probably get something for like 700 bucks. I'm just nervous that it would explode and there would be oil everywhere lol. 

post #22974 of 26371

The only thing I've found so far that's cheap and would be hilarious to learn on is this: http://boston.craigslist.org/sob/cto/5637363071.html

 

I wish this was running for the same reason: http://worcester.craigslist.org/cto/5646764252.html

post #22975 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post


The answer here is that only one of all these drivers had a GT3 wink.gif

 

lol! It shows that the rest of car matters too. :) Porsche has a long history of being able to do more with less power. I also love Lotus for that reason. Lovely cars. Lightweight, tossable fun. I got my ass kicked by a couple of Caterhams. Crazy power, lightweight, great suspension and tires, all wrapped up with great drivers. Awesome combination!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post


Considering my daily driver will have 800+ HP and 800+ ft-lb, I assure you the track car (which I alluded to in a previous post), won't be boring. wink.gif

Snap oversteer is an issue because it fundamentally says a car is unbalanced. The same can be said of other things like many regular cars understeer. A normal road car should be neutral.

I exclude many fast cars from that criteria, but you need to be at least at 911 level.

 

Now I'm really curious about your track car plans. :) 

How did Hammond describe a 911? Like building a pyramid with the pointy bit at the bottom. It's just wrong! lol!

I try to set up my cars to be fairly neutral, but with a 911 engine being at the back, there is a certain amount of finesse you need to drive it well. Same with my old 914-6. All that weight in the middle, like the MR2, also requires staying on top of the car. This also ties to proper seating, etc where you can really sense what's going on ASAP. That way you only need small corrections, rather than a quick prayer to your god to do the right large correction. lol!

Driving cars that can oversteer mid-turn requires practice to overcome a rather natural instinct to lift off the throttle if it's starting to oversteer. That's normal to do - but completely wrong in those cars. As you said, ideally you'd balance them as best as you can, but I will still emphasize car control practice. Autocross is a great place for people to start. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post


It's 'cars we drive', and the recent vibe has been great. There are great ones across all price points. The experience is what matters. None of us on here are Bill Gates.


Truth. There are so many great cars out there that are a ton of fun. Go to an autocross, you'll see a ton of smiling faces, driving all kinds of cars. :)

post #22976 of 26371
Like i said on the other thread, that prelude might be the best car you have posted. And a steal under 3k. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #22977 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

These just popped up too:

 

01 Saab 9-3 convertible for 2100: http://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/cto/5616927311.html

 

Definitely stay away from the Saab.  In addition to no manufacturer support, they're really difficult to unload if you don't like it or it has issues.  About 10 years ago our local MB dealer refused to take them in trade.  It also took one of my neighbors quite a while to unload a newer Saab than the one you mentioned, when they were buying a new car.  


Edited by Dino944 - 6/24/16 at 6:58am
post #22978 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

E36 BMW's are still great cars. rock solid chassis. i don't suppose you can stretch your budget to an E36 M3, can you? devil.gif

the only drawbacks is that the clutch is a little hard to learn on (the engagement isn't very linear), and if you happen to need a major repair while you own it, you'll be paying more than the 2500 you paid for the car. this one seems to have an extensive service history, which is good. but this father and son duo...i wonder, are they competent to be wrenching on BMW's? did they correctly diagnose everything needed on the car and take care of everything?

i'm leery of Saabs. if you ever need any kind of manufacturer support, well....the manufacturer doesn't exist anymore

I think the non-linear clutch engagement is due to the clutch delay valve.
I know E36 M3s had them. Not sure about the non E36.

Had an E36 M3 and clutch did not bother me.
Had an E46 330xi and clutch was irritatingly non-linear. Considered having the CDV removed.
E39 540 sort of non-linear but not too bad.
Z3 M not a problem.

I see people who say E36 parts are cheap. They forget to add "...for a BMW".

SAABs are cool but I can imagine few things more foolish than buying one.
post #22979 of 26371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

Looks like the miata is as highly regarded for a reason haha.


And like I'd mentioned elsewhere, I'd likely only toy with it if I was definitely going to sell my bike. 


My bike will out accelerate just about any car I'll own for the next decade, and probably most cars on the road till atleast 60. 

I guess I'm probably better off looking for one of the late NA miata's with the 1.8 engine, huh?

@HRoi
  @Dino944


Just got another email from the bimmer guy.

Timing belt done 10k miles ago. Most engine components are new or refurbished. 

Sounds like maybe the engine was swapped? I just asked.


In all likelihood, I'd probably put like... maybe 10-15k miles on the car before I sold it. It also wouldn't be a daily driver since I have another car.

Here's the reply: 

 
The new engine was put in at 170,000 miles… It was a rebuilt motor… New timing chain valve springs etc.… The engine has less than 50,000 miles on it… The father and son I bought the car from head way too many projects… Their estimate was that they put $7000 into this car in the engine transmission clutch suspension various other components and interior

The E36 318 had timing belts. E36 325/328/M3 had timing chains. The e46 are a lot more complex to work on than the e36

It's the rear shock tower mounts on both that cause problems. Not sure about any special issues with the convertibles
Edited by Rumpelstiltskin - 6/24/16 at 10:17am
post #22980 of 26371

still waiting on press photos of the wagon but this looks like a step in the right direction.

 

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