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post #22921 of 26984
Someone had to take the piss...
post #22922 of 26984
You guys are lucky over there, you actually CAN do engine swaps. That said, the only Miata i would ever own would have a N/A rotary in it. -i'll see myself out now. . . .



RTC . If you are going to get one. Tweak or change the engine when you just can't milk anymore out of it. And you are crying because the power is just not enough. It will happen. But you will know the car first.
Both first and 2nd gen can look good. Personal choice really.
post #22923 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

Oh awesome, I'll look into that. A friend had mentioned it yesterday, but didn't remember the name so I found it this morning and then read the thread and your guys' reviews.

AND THE CAR IS A 2015 WRX. Cool. 

 

How long do you think is reasonable for something like this? 4 hrs of instruction. Probably take an hour to get used to it and 2-3 hrs to actually start being anything resembling what could be called proficiency.

 

Four hours is great, and I hope you and your instructor work well together. I teach/coach several things, including autocross and some beginner track stuff, and my focus is teaching people how to learn how they learn best. Here are a couple things you can do in order to get the most from your instructor:

Be prepared! Bring along a list of questions you may have, like driving in rain/snow, etc. You'll no doubt find some hills, but you can't always choose the weather. :) These things are great to discuss near the end of your lesson, after you have a handle on the basics. Same with advanced driving techniques like heel/toe downshifting. Get as many pointers as you can from the instructor while you have this help in the passenger seat. Have your instructor demonstrate some of these things so you can learn what they feel like, including engine sounds and most notably, the lack of lurching. lol! Take notes too.

Something that will help you get the most out of the time with your instructor, is to be as ready as you can be with your regular driving. The fewer bad habits you have when you meet your instructor, the more time you can spend on the shifting. I've lost count of how many times I see people in automatic transmission cars with poor driving techniques. They get so sloppy. I can't write a book here, and great driving coaches like Ross Bentley have already done this, but I'll touch on some of the key things and let you dig into it further.

 

Many people sit too far back. Slide the seat forward until you have a decent bend in your knee when the brake pedal is fully pressed. I'm 6' tall and sit as close to the wheel as my father, who is 4 inches shorter than me. I need to move the seat back to get out.


Adjust the seat back incline angle. With your right shoulder flat against the back of the seat, you want to angle the seat forward so you can rest your right wrist on top of the wheel. My GT3 has fixed back racing seats and I can't adjust this, so I found a compromise position for the seat.

 

At this point your legs can offer great leverage and power, and your hands are close enough to turn the wheel 180 degrees when you hold the wheel at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock. Not 10/2. Not hands hanging off the bottom of the wheel or laying on the top. Hands aren't out the window, holding onto a mirror or roof either. They also aren't resting on the gear shift. Keep the damn things on the wheel at 9/3. lol!

 

Left foot should be on the dead pedal. Not curled up under the seat. Keep the left foot on the dead pedal. When you are using a clutch, move the left foot to the clutch pedal, do your thing, then it goes back to the dead pedal.

 

When braking hard, keep both hands on the wheel until the car is stable, then do when you need to do (downshifting, etc). Never brake hard with one hand on the wheel.

 

When you start shifting gears and require a shift, then you can move your right hand to the gear shift, do your thing, then it goes back to the wheel. Take a full second to shift - don't rush it! You break things when you rush.

 

Be smooth. Use your eyes to look way ahead and scan everywhere for potential danger areas. You get more advanced notice of things that way. This is especially important when you start driving with a manual because your attention will be diverted to the shifting thing.

 

That's enough typing for now. Sorry if this is all review, but like I said, I constantly see poor examples of driving. :)

post #22924 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post

You guys are lucky over there, you actually CAN do engine swaps. That said, the only Miata i would ever own would have a N/A rotary in it. -i'll see myself out now. . . .
 

Not an aluminum V8? :)

post #22925 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al9146 View Post

Not an aluminum V8? smile.gif

Good lord no. lol8[1].gif
post #22926 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post



Good lord no. lol8[1].gif

Lol!
post #22927 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post

You guys are lucky over there, you actually CAN do engine swaps.
What do you mean? Are they illegal in Japan?
post #22928 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

What do you mean? Are they illegal in Japan?

Tricky topic. You can turbo a non-turbo engine. Or swap in a turbo varient of a non-turbo engine.
So turbo an FA20 in a toyota 86? Yes. Supercharge it? Yes. Drop in a 5.0 V12 from a Toyota century? No.

If you have a Chaser with a non-turbo 1jz, you can swap it for a 1jzgte. The turbo varient. No, you can't drop in a 2jzgte, even if you have the 1jzgte. Because of displacement. And engine serial numbers.
Which is why my work buddy. Who runs a 450+hp 1jzgte chaser, will be running the heads and vvt-i from the 2jz on the 1jz bottom end. Giving him a stroked 2.8 liter twin cam forged internal monster pushing up around 600 ponies.

You can't put an LS brick into anything. And you can't put a rotary in a Miata. It's weird. But it does encourage both owners and tuning companies to develop a myriad of potent engines. In interesting combos and platforms. Which is why the tuning parts selection is so vast here. Changing to a completely different engine, from a different manufacturer is in fact illegal.

It is possible. But it requires an amazing amount of paperwork, even by Japanese standards. You can register your car as a one off build car. Or custom car. And omfg is it something you don't want to look at. Just build the engine in your car. Make it grip better, go faster, stop better. And forget you ever imagined a miata powered by the sound of Braaaaap. tongue.gif

Oh, and you can manual swap an Auto car.
Edited by Thrift Vader - 6/22/16 at 5:56am
post #22929 of 26984
Ah, I see. I suspect it may have something to do with differing tax rates by engine type, or maybe emissions regs?
post #22930 of 26984
It stems from land size, needing to register your car to a parking spot.for land, emissions, and to drive consumption in the car market. Kei cars do not need a spot. And are under 700cc. The "shakensho" is a document connected to your car's VIN number. Any mods you do can not alter the information on it. Except for engine series being the same. Or manual. As transmissions themselves do not affect vehicle measurements or emissions. It boils down to size. And capacity. It's very complex if you want to create. And it's also what makes special models so valuable. Because they have the good stuff to begin with.
post #22931 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrift Vader View Post

You guys are lucky over there, you actually CAN do engine swaps. That said, the only Miata i would ever own would have a N/A rotary in it. -i'll see myself out now. . . .




RTC . If you are going to get one. Tweak or change the engine when you just can't milk anymore out of it. And you are crying because the power is just not enough. It will happen. But you will know the car first.

Both first and 2nd gen can look good. Personal choice really.
The turbo kits for those cars gets you about 230 WHP at the wheel. For a car that weighs like 2300lbs, that's pretty solid, no? Supercharger kits get you like 200whp. If nothing else, it's not going to be slower than my 2.5 TS stock haha. 133 hp @ 2200 lbs vs 166 @ 3100 lbs.

That's like a 5-6 second 0-60 and more than enough for street use. The rotary swap sounds sick too, and the RX7 is a really interesting car. Didn't that engine have a ton of issues though, or was that the RX8?

Most of the point of the miata was to get a fun car to learn stick on and then either sell or turbo/super charge it.

It's basically the only 'fun' car that could make sense as a toy for a student since its pretty cheap. I'd like to learn to do the injectors etc on it myself as well if I had time. Looks like a lot of the turbo kits can be scaled up, i.e. put on turbo and manifold and boost to 5 psi. When $$$ permits, add intercooler, injectors, and fuel management and boost to like 8-10 psi. The stock block can handle 12 psi which is pretty awesome. The 1.8 motor has even more potential, but looks like those cars go for a bit more.

230hp on a miata sounds ridiculously fun. Looks like it can be done for under 5k if you build piecemeal.

If you have recs for cheap fun manual cars with lots of part availability, then I'm open to entertain it. Maybe an old mustang convertible would be fun too. I'm certainly open to ideas, but the miata is so highly recommended that I'm curious.
Edited by ridethecliche - 6/22/16 at 12:18pm
post #22932 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawlin View Post

How much trouble is a higher-mileage 95 C2 going to give me? Currently has 130,000 miles on the clock. As per the seller, new at 98,000 miles:

-clutch kit
-all engine gaskets
-ignition wires
-chain guide and tensioners
-slave cylinder / master cylinder
-valve guides
-dual mass flywheel & pilot bearing
* MO30 suspension kit (Bilstein HDs, ROW MO30 coil springs,
drop links and sway bar).
* New A/C evaporator and expansion valve
* New fuel pump and relay
* HID (zenon) front headlight kit (Carnewal)
* Hella driving lights
* Clear turn signal lenses & TTS air scoops (Carnewal)
* Scrape bar

Anyone with experience with 993s?

Oil changes prob run you about $160

Maybe steering rack will go bad soon?

Your guy did a lot of the typical stuff.

Car will prob leak / burn a little oil, wouldn't be too alarmed.

Alternator is something I had randomly go.

I would ballpark it at $2000 a year in upkeep on average. It will be like 500, 500, 5000, 2000, 500. Something like that.
post #22933 of 26984
Wait...don't get a rotary swap. The only reason Thrift Vader likes those is because he can rebuild the engine himself tongue.gif
post #22934 of 26984
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

Wait...don't get a rotary swap. The only reason Thrift Vader likes those is because he can rebuild the engine himself tongue.gif

 

I wouldn't. I'd just turbo it.


The RX7 looks like a fun car with a ton of headaches. The turbo miata is pretty solidly tested. It's also buildable on a student-friendly budget if done slowly over time using used parts. I could probably build one with more HP than a stock WRX for about the same cost in a more reliable setup. Wouldn't have the AWD funzies, but it could be a decent setup. Currently debating whether I want to wait it out for a 1.8L car or just go for a cheaper 1.6.

 

The 1.6 can be built up to 230 hp, the early 1.8 (94-97) to 250, and the NB 1.8 to 265 (99-05). 

I haven't found any 99's at a reasonable cost. 90's and 91's are everywhere. Haven't found much of the 94-97 stuff either. Could obviously swap a 1.8 into a 1.6 but that seems like a waste of time/money if I'm shopping right now.


I could also wait till the summer starts to wind down and the prices start to drop in this area, but that defeats the purpose...

post #22935 of 26984
Remind me your budget and buying considerations? I think you're getting way too caught up in "plans for the car", which is the ruin of many a good car and harbinger for buyer's remorse. Pick a car you like that's fun while stock, and worry about mods much later. If you're looking at early Miatas, I'd throw MR2s of any of the three gens into the plan.
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