or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Dress for a 'fine" dining experience in America
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dress for a 'fine" dining experience in America - Page 7

post #91 of 139
You might be surprised by the frequency of which such behaviour is seen in restaurants that cater to an even higher clientele than the four ladies.
post #92 of 139
You know, the interesting thing about that is that a few years ago, Riedel came out with their O series of wineglasses which are Bdx glasses w/o stems. Apparently some people noticed differences in the bouquets of wines because of the heat from their hands, so they modified their glasses accordingly, creating the market for these type of glasses.
post #93 of 139
Holding a glass by the bowl is more sensual.
post #94 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
As an aside, this is something I've never been able to square with Sex and the City; the characters all invariably hold their wine glasses by the bowl. New Yorkers of the stratum they are supposed to represent know better.
They're Trump classy
post #95 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
As an addendum, never hold the wine glass by the bowl-it is gauche.
In school I was taught that if you ever saw anyone holding their wine glass anyway other than by the stem; you were to knock it out of their hands at the nearest opportunity, and make no apology for it.
post #96 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford
Yes - you need to be careful. Ken may start taking his own sound system to restaurants so that he can better appreciate the background Muzak.

My grandmother, Esther Root Adams, used to demand that the music be turned down or changed and that the air conditioning in the restaurant be adjusted to her liking. And by god, she got her way with no complaints.
post #97 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Yes and no. Resistance isn't the only factor. Fancy cable geometries and materials can alter the sound by altering capacitance and inductance. This is measurable both subjectively and with instruments. For most people with average systems, fancy cables will not amount to any improvement.

The audiophile cable industry is largely driven by flashy marketing schemes and biased reviews paid for by advertising dollars in those same magazines, but there is validity behind some of the claims. Sometimes an appropriately chosen cable can complement a speaker that is particularly hard to drive. Inductance isn't usually a concern, but sometimes you come across a piece of gear that benefits from a cable designed to minimize it. Again, it's not something you'll have to worry about with mainstream gear.

Anyway, I get what your saying about the placebo effect and how it relates to effect of the glass on the taste of your wine ;p

It's all about system synergy. There is no question that cables sound different, the only issue to be resolved is which sound you prefer.

With regard to the first post, Ken, I really do get the feeling that you walk into a place, scanning the room for something amiss. I'm not saying I haven't done this myself, but I'm a lot happier when I don't.
post #98 of 139
According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution review...

Quote:
Ahhh, Bacchanalia. It exudes the modern, warm tones and warehouse chic Atlantans love. And perhaps more than any other Atlanta restaurant, Bacchanalia represents what great dining means to us: Chef-owners Clifford Harrison and Anne Quatrano cook with easygoing personality and use the freshest ingredients possible. Their sense of flair and flavor coaxes, then lulls you into submission. Daily menu changes make it hard to play favorites, but expect full-flavored freshness from everything from Kumamoto oysters with cucumber and peri peri peppers to the precious Royal Gala apple puree that accompanies your foie gras. Ingredients such as cavelo nero, hakurei turnips, lady apples and tarbais beans aren't just words thrown around on the menu; with one of the finest local provenders fronting the restaurant, if it's possible, they'll have it. The warm Valrhona chocolate cake with mint ice cream can always be counted on for fireworks at dessert.

However, the dress code is described as

Quote:
Dress Code
Business Casual

So I'm really finding this entire thread to be kind of silly after finding that information.l
post #99 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford
...So I'm really finding this entire thread to be kind of silly after finding that information.l

ewww... "Biz Caz" *shudder*
post #100 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Yes, but a man taking two hours to trying to look like he just rolled out of bed is very California.

That is almost exactly what I think when I see the so called "stars" on the TV with the spike hair. They sat in the dressing room all that time to get "that result."

Can't you see the resumes now?
Such as "I was the Jean Slasher most preferred by XXX video star."

Pretty silly.
post #101 of 139
Note that the NYT does article on guess what place to eat?
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/19/di...gewanted=print
The New York Times
Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By

July 19, 2006
The Chef: Anne Quatrano
Peaches and Ice Milk: A Marriage Made in Georgia
By KIM SEVERSON

CARTERSVILLE, Ga.

IF you're a sous-chef, having a boss with a farm is not always such a great thing.

Anne Quatrano and her husband, Clifford Harrison, live on 60 acres about an hour's drive from their three Atlanta restaurants. They've got chickens, turkeys and goats. They've got a few random head of cattle and two pigs. They've got herb beds and pea vines.

And they've got peach trees. Dozens of peach trees. The fruit grows on trees that shade the modern farmhouse she designed, and stretch out over her family property.

"They aren't pretty, but they're delicious," Ms. Quatrano said of the fruit they bear.

The peaches from their trees come in three waves, the early clings in late June, then a crop of white peaches and, closer to August, the peaches the chef likes best.

Last year, the trees were so prolific that Mr. Harrison filled the bed of his pickup truck with a few thousand pounds of fruit and drove it to Bacchanalia, their first restaurant and the flagship of a mini-empire that includes the Floataway Café, Quinones at Bacchanalia and the specialty food store, Star Provisions.

"The chefs just dropped their jaws," Mr. Harrison said. The cooks canned, froze and juiced peaches until the truck was empty.

Here in New York, lovers of stone fruit can only dream of such a bounty. But Northeast peaches are starting to show up at farm stands, and Ms. Quatrano suggests putting them to good use in a simple dessert.

Like any self-respecting Atlanta chef, she has a solid repertoire of peach desserts. A favorite is based on a simple maceration of lemon juice and sugar.

The process gives a little assist to fruit that isn't quite ripe or is slightly flawed. Ms. Quatrano reminds people that if they buy peaches that are not yet ripe the fruit will soften (but will not technically ripen more) if left at room temperature for a day or so. But if the peaches are fragrant and ripe, the sugar-lemon bath in this recipe can be skipped, she said.

Don't store peaches piled in a bowl. They are delicate and need to be left in a single layer to prevent bruising.

For the rest of the dessert, Ms. Quatrano browns rounds of brioche, although a fresh biscuit will work. Then she carefully steeps dried chamomile blossoms "” just like the kind one might make a cup of tea with "” in hot, sweetened milk for about 20 minutes.

She turns the scented milk into ice milk, which marries the peaches to the brioche. Ms. Quatrano likes how the chamomile brings out the honey notes in the peaches and gives them a fuller flavor.

The ice milk itself is a surprisingly refreshing contrast to the heavy, custard-based ice creams coming out of many a chef's ice-cream maker lately. The only drawback, and it's a small one, is that it can crystallize when left in the freezer.

Fresh from the machine, though, the ice milk has plenty of sweet dairy notes and a creamy texture.

"Why bother making a custard?" Ms. Quatrano said. "I understand the richness thing, but the lightness of an ice milk is much more appealing in the summer."

Home

* World
* U.S.
* N.Y. / Region
* Business
* Technology
* Science
* Health
* Sports
* Opinion
* Arts
* Style
* Travel
* Jobs
* Real Estate
* Automobiles
* Back to Top

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

* Privacy Policy
* Search
* Corrections
* XML
* Help
* Contact Us
* Work for Us
* Site Map
post #102 of 139
Good friends:
I have dined with The Great Pollock at Bacchanalia quite often in the past, primarily over lunch, and even at the lunch hour you find many businessmen shedding ties and attending dishabille. Over the Christmas holidays a friend and I had dinner at Bacchanalia, and she and I were the only ones there who were decently dressed. Of course, she would never have dinner with me there if I were not appropriately dressed, with coat and tie, as that is what she expects of men who take her out.
This thing about the "California" look is a bit of a mystery to me as I have learned from long experience around women, that men dress largely to please their wives and girlfriends. Most men resist this as they seem to want to dress like their fathers who dressed as their class required. I think women have latched on to the California look because they think it makes their men look sexy, desirable, and they get this from what they see in the grunge magazines. It's too bad George Fraser is not living at this hour.
This brings to mind a recent visit to Brooks Brothers in Atlanta. As is well-known, women account for by far the greater amount of sales at Brooks Bros. , and they make decisions and buy for their sons and husbands. My salesman friend was busy putting together the ensemble for the groomsmen of a wedding, and the bride to be was in the store selecting each element of the ensemble: blazer, white ducks, shirt, tie and shoes.
I find this instructive. I have a hunch that it's the women, who are supposed to be the moral and ethical guardians of our youth, who have gone over the edge with this hip thing and certainly started or furthered the decline of Western Civilization.
Anyway, that seems to me to be the burden of the argument of The Great Pollock.
post #103 of 139
Wow, did you really just say that most men desire to dress like their fathers?

Not even really sure what to say to that.
post #104 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comolli
Good friends:
I have dined with The Great Pollock at Bacchanalia quite often in the past, primarily over lunch, and even at the lunch hour you find many businessmen shedding ties and attending dishabille. Over the Christmas holidays a friend and I had dinner at Bacchanalia, and she and I were the only ones there who were decently dressed. Of course, she would never have dinner with me there if I were not appropriately dressed, with coat and tie, as that is what she expects of men who take her out.
This thing about the "California" look is a bit of a mystery to me as I have learned from long experience around women, that men dress largely to please their wives and girlfriends. Most men resist this as they seem to want to dress like their fathers who dressed as their class required. I think women have latched on to the California look because they think it makes their men look sexy, desirable, and they get this from what they see in the grunge magazines. It's too bad George Fraser is not living at this hour.
This brings to mind a recent visit to Brooks Brothers in Atlanta. As is well-known, women account for by far the greater amount of sales at Brooks Bros. , and they make decisions and buy for their sons and husbands. My salesman friend was busy putting together the ensemble for the groomsmen of a wedding, and the bride to be was in the store selecting each element of the ensemble: blazer, white ducks, shirt, tie and shoes.
I find this instructive. I have a hunch that it's the women, who are supposed to be the moral and ethical guardians of our youth, who have gone over the edge with this hip thing and certainly started or furthered the decline of Western Civilization.
Anyway, that seems to me to be the burden of the argument of The Great Pollock.

At my local BB, I see five men for every woman, so I'd be shocked if that store sells more to women.
post #105 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Checks
At my local BB, I see five men for every woman, so I'd be shocked if that store sells more to women.

Ditto. I rarely see a woman shopping at BB in SCP, and if they are, they're buying something for themselves (although hopefully not one of those hideous necktie belts)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Dress for a 'fine" dining experience in America