or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › Tea good for weightloss?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tea good for weightloss?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
So lately I've been working a lot instead of eating I sometimes have just gotten tea. I grew up drinking a lot of tea as a kid, having an english background. Always with a little bit of milk, sometimes brown sugar or honey.

I've noticed that this really fills me up as a snack. Should fat people consider this? I suppose that warm broths and such things would work, but would this be a bad idea?
post #2 of 26
Caffeine inhabits appetite. See other threads on thsi concwept (too lazy to find).
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Caffeine inhabits appetite. See other threads on thsi concwept (too lazy to find).

What is the caffeine content of most black teas? I was led to belief that it is lower than coffee. Is this true?
post #4 of 26
A google search is easier than asking here, but I do think your average black tea has less caffeine than your average cup of joe.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Then, if it works as serving as a snack for me, then why don't fat people do it?

When I know I've eaten too much, the next day I'll usually make at least one meal a soup, and I'll drink lots of tea. It's amazing how well it works for substituting a small meal.
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
What is the caffeine content of most black teas? I was led to belief that it is lower than coffee. Is this true?

When referring to caffeine's effect as a substitute for a meal, the issue becomes a dichotomy whereby a person either eats or doesn't eat, and there are other far more powerful factors (environment, habit, etc.) than the endocrine effects of caffeine to control their decision.

To answer the question directly: for coffee from American coffee shops, caffeine content generally doesn't vary by much. That stuff is cut with so much water. It depends on the bean and brew as well.

Home-brew (especially loose leaf) tea probably roughly has the same caffeine content. If there's a difference it's only around 25% or so.

Like all drugs, caffeine follows a dose-response relationship. That is, having more caffeine won't concomitantly make appetite more suppressed -- a statement which, through the abnormality of using it with a comparitive alone, should demonstrate a relative dichotomy and lack of gradation in appetite suppression when substituting a meal with a caffeinated beverage.
post #7 of 26
Green Tea
post #8 of 26
Green tea seems to help with weight loss. I remembered reading this article about it from an English physician. http://www.drbriffa.com/blog/2009/02...abdominal-fat/ Study suggests extracts from green tea may help the body shed abdominal fat Posted on 12 February 2009 Back in March one of my blog posts focused on the effects of green tea constituents known as catechins had on the metabolism of fat in the body. A recent study has found that green tea catechins stimulated fat-burning in the body, something which is an obvious boon to individuals seeking to attain or maintain a healthy weight. This study came on the back of other evidence which suggests that catechins can indeed promote fat loss in the human body [1]. Further evidence for the weight loss promoting effects of catechins has come in the form of another study published recently in the Journal of Nutrition [2]. In this study, 107 individuals were given a daily beverage containing 625 mg of catechins or a drink containing no catechins for a period of 12 weeks. 625 mg of catechins is amount to be found in the equivalent of about 5 cups of green tea. Both drinks also contained identical amounts (39 mg) of caffeine. Over the 12-week study period, individuals were advised to partake in three hours or more of moderate intensity activity each week. 3 or more exercise sessions were supervised. At the beginning and end of the study, participants underwent a variety of measurements including body composition and the ‘abdominal fat area’ (a measure of amount of fat in and around the abdomen). Higher abdominal fat area readings are a concern because it is fat in this region of the body that is most strongly correlated with an increase in risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The results of this study found that changes in overall fat levels (fat mass) in the body were not different between the two groups. However, fat area in the abdomen was significantly lower in the group consuming the catechin-laced beverage. As an added bonus, levels of blood fats known as triglycerides were significantly lower the catechin-consuming group too. This is good news because raised triglyeride levels are associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Taken as a whole, this and previous research suggests that catechins derived from green tea may boost the body’s metabolism of fat, particularly abdominal fat. It might also be borne in mind that other research has linked green tea with potential protection from conditions such as cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. A word of caution though: a recently published study found evidence that green tea components appear to block the action of the chemotherapy drug bortezomib (Velcade) [4]. Those taking this drug should consult their doctors regarding green tea use. References: 1. Nagao T, et al. Ingestion of a tea rich in catechins leads to a reduction in body fat and malondialdehyde-modified LDL in men. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2005;81(1):122-129 2. Maki KC, et al. Green Tea Catechin Consumption Enhances Exercise-Induced Abdominal Fat Loss in Overweight and Obese Adults. J Nutr 2009 139: 264-270. 3. Khokhar S, et al. Total phenol, catechin, and caffeine contents of teas commonly consumed in the United Kingdom. J Agric Food Chem. 2002;50(3):565-70. 4. Golden EB, et al. Green tea polyphenols block the anticancer effects of bortezomib and other boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitors. Blood. 2009 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]
post #9 of 26
Yes, if drinking tea prevents you from drinking something else with more calories.

Caffeine also stimulates the bowels, but it doesn't matter how you get the caffeine.
post #10 of 26
Hopefully this is an obvious statement, but you should not substitute exercise with tea consumption.
While there may be some diet affects and metabolic response, the results are not significant enough to forgo exercise.
post #11 of 26
Caffeine helps to boost your body's thermogenic capabilities ie burning fat. You shouldn't replace a quality meal with tea, and certainly not replace exercise Cut out the sugar as well. I've seen 5 cups a day reccomended, not only to help boost fat loss but also for the antioxidants and stress reduction.
post #12 of 26
I think you are laboring under the false assumption that fat people only eat because they are hungry.
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J'aimelescravates View Post
Hopefully this is an obvious statement, but you should not substitute exercise with tea consumption.
While there may be some diet affects and metabolic response, the results are not significant enough to forgo exercise.

I wasn't saying that. I was just thinking it could help someone avoid snacking.
post #14 of 26
Pretty sure if you're hungry, you're not drinking tea. And if you have that kind of self control already, tea isn't the solution anyway.
post #15 of 26
I dont care about the science I drink tea and Im skinny
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Health & Body
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › Tea good for weightloss?