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Criticize my workout routine

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
This is what I do in a typical week:

5 workouts overall, consisting of a combination of

1) Swimming: approx 40 min, 0.8 - 1 mile.

2) Indoor cycling on trainer: 45 min. at around 200 watts on average.

3) Outdoor cycling: every other week, about 35 miles, half hilly, half flat.

My goal to to reduce weight - I'm looking to lose about 10 lbs.

Anything I should change? add?
post #2 of 28
Running/Jogging couldn't hurt unless there's a particular reason you don't do it? Sounds like a good routine in any case.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks, drizzt.

I do occasionally run, but I'm very bad at it - I have the cardiovascular stamina, but, for all the cycling I do, my legs are still the weakest link. I probably need to allot more time for that.
post #4 of 28
Yeah, that would round it out if you are looking for a purely cardio workout. Some circuit weight training and/or body weight workouts could also be useful as well.
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Associate
Thanks, drizzt.

I do occasionally run, but I'm very bad at it - I have the cardiovascular stamina, but, for all the cycling I do, my legs are still the weakest link. I probably need to allot more time for that.


Some light weight training could help you up the stamina in your legs, at least that's what my trainer told me once.
post #6 of 28
In terms of burning enough calories to lose ten pounds in a reasonable period of time, you're doing great. The only suggestion I'd make would be to maybe work in some sort of whole-body exercise that is a little less regimented. If you enjoy basketball or tennis or racquetball, adding that to the mix would be great. You'll still get some cardio benefit and burn some calories, but I'm a great believer that these sorts of activities - where you involve various body parts, sometimes in unanticipated and free-flowing ways - are excellent for overall health, core strength, balance, flexibility, etc. Plus, the add an element of "fun" that isn't necessarily present in some of your other actitivies.
post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
In terms of burning enough calories to lose ten pounds in a reasonable period of time, you're doing great. The only suggestion I'd make would be to maybe work in some sort of whole-body exercise that is a little less regimented. If you enjoy basketball or tennis or racquetball, adding that to the mix would be great. You'll still get some cardio benefit and burn some calories, but I'm a great believer that these sorts of activities - where you involve various body parts, sometimes in unanticipated and free-flowing ways - are excellent for overall health, core strength, balance, flexibility, etc. Plus, the add an element of "fun" that isn't necessarily present in some of your other actitivies.

Great suggestion. Unfortunately, I am completely hopeless with any activity involving the display of dexterity with a ball...

In terms of burning calories, you'd think what I do should be enough, but weight loss has been slow. At least the trend is downwards. I'm not fat by any stretch, but my goal of getting back to the shape I was at 18 - err, about 18 years ago - is still some ways off.
post #8 of 28
Put in some weight training twice a week and your training would be set.

As far as your goal of losing fat, that is all about diet. Get your diet it check and you'll be sweet.
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Associate
Unfortunately, I am completely hopeless with any activity involving the display of dexterity with a ball.

Actually, then racquetball may be good for you. Coming from a long-time (competitive) player, if you're good at it, you don't move much--you're opponent does--but if you're bad, you run like hell. Doesn't give your upper-body much of a workout though. You'll lose, but you'll run a lot.

As for building the legs, I was always told that no matter how much time I spent in spinning classes my legs wouldn't really get any stronger--I had to go lift weights for that. That seemed to be the truth (but I'm no trainer).


bob
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Actually, then racquetball may be good for you. Coming from a long-time (competitive) player, if you're good at it, you don't move much--you're opponent does--but if you're bad, you run like hell. Doesn't give your upper-body much of a workout though. You'll lose, but you'll run a lot.

That's pretty much my MO with all sports - I suck, so I expend more energy for the same amount of forward progress, which I guess is a good thing if you want to lose weight but kinda bad for your ego.
post #11 of 28
Weight training is absolutely critical!

A lot of overweight people just diet and do cardio, and sure they lose several pounds a week. But a lot of the weight they lose is from muscle! Therefore, they do burn some fat, but because they lose muscle as well, their fat/muscle ratio doesn't change much and they still retain that "soft" look. If you don't quite understand: It's much better to lose 9lb of fat and 1lb of muscle than to lose 5lbof fat and 5lb of muscle.

You should not base progress on the scale! You should base it on measurements (waist, arm, chest, etc) and the mirror. Your aim is fat loss, not weight loss!

Anyone can lose weight, you just have to make sure that most of what you're losing is fat, not muscle! You do this by having the right diet (complex carbs, healthy fats, and lots of protein) and an intense weight-lifting routine (you must lift heavy and sweat!). Doing these things will yield far greater results than just dieting and running, I guarantee it!

For fat loss:

Diet = 90% Weightlifting = 9% Cardio = 1% (great for your heart though!)
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bystandering
Weight training is absolutely critical!

A lot of overweight people just diet and do cardio, and sure they lose several pounds a week. But a lot of the weight they lose is from muscle! Therefore, they do burn some fat, but because they lose muscle as well, their fat/muscle ratio doesn't change much and they still retain that "soft" look. If you don't quite understand: It's much better to lose 9lb of fat and 1lb of muscle than to lose 5lbof fat and 5lb of muscle.

You should not base progress on the scale! You should base it on measurements (waist, arm, chest, etc) and the mirror. Your aim is fat loss, not weight loss!

Anyone can lose weight, you just have to make sure that most of what you're losing is fat, not muscle! You do this by having the right diet (complex carbs, healthy fats, and lots of protein) and an intense weight-lifting routine (you must lift heavy and sweat!). Doing these things will yield far greater results than just dieting and running, I guarantee it!

For fat loss:

Diet = 90% Weightlifting = 9% Cardio = 1% (great for your heart though!)

But doesn't swimming incorporate resistance? couldn't it be thought of as a form of weight or resistance training? Unlike running, etc. I know that since I started swimming I definitely gained muscle tone in my upper body, including pecs and triceps.

My problem with heavy lifting is that it tends to bulk up my upper body, which I do not want and is not exactly conducive to bespoke tailoring. I do believe that of all professional athletes, swimmers have the best phisiques (though I'm sure they incorporate some sort of weight lifting in their training).
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Associate
But doesn't swimming incorporate resistance? couldn't it be thought of as a form of weight or resistance training? Unlike running, etc. I know that since I started swimming I definitely gained muscle tone in my upper body, including pecs and triceps.

My problem with heavy lifting is that it tends to bulk up my upper body, which I do not want and is not exactly conducive to bespoke tailoring. I do believe that of all professional athletes, swimmers have the best phisiques (though I'm sure they incorporate some sort of weight lifting in their training).

A lot of people I know that are a bit overweight have this misconception that they'll grow muscle and get big overnight. That's simply not going to happen, especially if you're eating at a deficit (I'm assuming you're going to diet a little or eat healthier at least). In fact, it's probable that you're going to lose muscle.

Basically, let's say you lose 10lb without lifting heavy weights. Let's say 5 of those lb is fat and 5 of it is muscle. Now let's say you lose 10lb with heavy lifting. And let's say that 9 lb is fat loss and only 1lb is muscle loss. The outcome: The one who lifted weights will have a much better looking body (smaller waist, bigger arms, more definition everywhere) because he lost more fat yet retained his muscle.

Additionally, weight lifting burns a helluva amount of calories by speeding your metabolism.

Bottom line is that incorporating heavy weight lifting is the fastest and best way for you to change your body. You're also not going to grow muscle overnight to address that concern of yours. Especially if you diet, it's going to be pretty damn impossible to gain muscle. (If you do gain a bit of muscle at first, it's due to "newbie gains" and should subside)

Yep, swimmers and all athletes lift weights. All the track runners and swimmers I've known have incorporated a weight training regimen that includes heavy squats and pressing.
post #14 of 28
One suggestion would be the "Heavy Hands" fast walking program. Do a Google search for some info on it. Walk fast, weights in hands, lift hands to head high. Working more muscles gets the job done faster - and will build a bit of muscle.

I really do believe that you should use one day for weights.

I'm no expert, just a reader.
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bystandering
A lot of people I know that are a bit overweight have this misconception that they'll grow muscle and get big overnight. That's simply not going to happen, especially if you're eating at a deficit (I'm assuming you're going to diet a little or eat healthier at least). In fact, it's probable that you're going to lose muscle.

Basically, let's say you lose 10lb without lifting heavy weights. Let's say 5 of those lb is fat and 5 of it is muscle. Now let's say you lose 10lb with heavy lifting. And let's say that 9 lb is fat loss and only 1lb is muscle loss. The outcome: The one who lifted weights will have a much better looking body (smaller waist, bigger arms, more definition everywhere) because he lost more fat yet retained his muscle.

Additionally, weight lifting burns a helluva amount of calories by speeding your metabolism.

Bottom line is that incorporating heavy weight lifting is the fastest and best way for you to change your body. You're also not going to grow muscle overnight to address that concern of yours. Especially if you diet, it's going to be pretty damn impossible to gain muscle. (If you do gain a bit of muscle at first, it's due to "newbie gains" and should subside)

Yep, swimmers and all athletes lift weights. All the track runners and swimmers I've known have incorporated a weight training regimen that includes heavy squats and pressing.

Perhaps I can try to fit in one weight lifting session a week and see how it goes for a couple months. I guess it won't do too much damage.
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