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National Park visits - Page 3

post #31 of 58
I just got back from a long Maine trip that included a whole week in a sailboat. Acadia in May (where there are few crowds) is amazing. The 20 mile scenic route on a bike (during the middle of the week in May with little to no car traffic) is one of the best bike rides I've ever done. I did two loops. if you're into parks and laid out hiking acadia actually takes a couple to three days to really enjoy. they even have some scary assed cliffside trails that are easy but almost too scary just to walk on, plus there's a small clean beach [with a surprising amount of eye candy], when I was there even the park ranger was a Blonde blue eyed hottie probably in her early 20's all three days I was visiting. I went in late march/early april in 2009 and almost died slipping on a snowy/icy cliffside trail in acadia. I'm so glad I went in late May this year. But Acadia (and maine in general) in June-august is a hell hole. The park and maine in general is still beautiful and awe inspiring, but the crowds (for anything from lobstershacks to whale watching) just make it unbearable sometimes. I've been to the grand canyon in peak season and it can still handle (kudos to the people involved with infrastructure there) the crowds, traffic, and congestion. EDIT: here's the beach: (random interwebs pic) here's some pics i took:
post #32 of 58
^ Jealous. I miss visiting Maine, and I've always wanted to visit Acadia.
post #33 of 58
Some snaps from my trip to Big Bend: Chihuahuan Desert Rio Grande at sunrise. Santa Elena Canyon Emory Peak: Highest point of elevation in the park at 7,875 ft.
post #34 of 58
^ Nice.

I had no idea there were mountains there, I've always thought of it as the Rio Grande park.
post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post
^ Nice.

I had no idea there were mountains there, I've always thought of it as the Rio Grande park.

There are tons of mountains in the Basin. I stayed there for the first four days, then moved down to Rio Grande Village--that's more desert land. Then, my last few days were spent at the Cottonwood campground, which actually had green grass and trees! Nice change of pace from the monotony of desert sand.
post #36 of 58
You also might consider St. John: (Yes. Those are my toes in both pictures)
post #37 of 58
in california, all of the laudatory comments about osemite are well-deserved. but I want to represent for Deat Valley as well. It's beautiful in a stark (or, in the spring, fairly lush) way, and the vastness of the spaces is amazing. and I have found that if you're willing to hike more than 15 minutes from a trailhead, you can go for hours without seeing another person. (If you're a misanthrope like me, that's a good thing.) it's also quiet in a way few places are anymore. when i get home tonight I'l try to post some pictures I took there a few months ago.
post #38 of 58
Yes, Death Valley is incredible. I've also experienced that ear filling silence in parts of Joshua Tree, though JT isn't nearly as interesting of a visit.
post #39 of 58
While not a National Park, I'd suggest the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in Minnesota. Remarkable wilderness; most of the 1,000,000 acres are closed to motorized traffic. No cans or bottles allowed, pack out what you bring in. Voyageurs National Park is a short jaunt further west.
post #40 of 58
The redwood park in the far north of California is worth a visit. Uncrowded.
post #41 of 58
DV (the surface I'm standing on in the next-to-last photo is not sand, but salt in the Badwater area of the park) Zabriskie Point, probably the most famous vista in the park Golden Canyon Golden Canyon (right below Zabriskie) shifting sand dunes between Stovepipe Wells and Furnace Creek Dante's Peak Natural Bridge hike, basically the entrance to one side of Golden Canyon Badlands salt flats sunset over Mosaic Canyon
post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post
Yes. Especially this year, when the melt finally gets under way for real!

Yeah. I went last year in June just about a year ago, and the waterfalls were really steaming then, so I'm thinking this year they'll be even better even later into the summer.
post #43 of 58
double post
post #44 of 58
Looks amazing, lawyerdad. I'd love to go there next Winter.
post #45 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakota rube View Post
While not a National Park, I'd suggest the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in Minnesota. Remarkable wilderness; most of the 1,000,000 acres are closed to motorized traffic. No cans or bottles allowed, pack out what you bring in.

. . .

Voyageurs National Park is a short jaunt further west.

Nice, Rube.
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