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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 526

post #7876 of 7912
How do I make Chicken broth at home? I bought the chicken bones from the store for the broth but dunno how to go about it?! Any suggestions?

Simpler the better.

Warm the bones in water with salt, butter, onions for 5 hrs, perhaps?
post #7877 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullrams View Post

How do I make Chicken broth at home? I bought the chicken bones from the store for the broth but dunno how to go about it?! Any suggestions?

Simpler the better.

Warm the bones in water with salt, butter, onions for 5 hrs, perhaps?

You could add butter although I don't think most folks do. Standard approach would be to simmer the carcass with a few basic vegetables (onions, carrots, celery), a bit of salt and pepper (herbs like bay leaf or parsley depending on taste).

Five hours is a long time. Bring it all to a boil, reduce to simmer and cover, and give it a couple of hours. Taste.

Just please don't be a douche and call it "bone broth". smile.gif
post #7878 of 7912
Here's all you'll ever need to know about making stock at home:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/10/how-to-make-rich-flavorful-easy-chicken-stock.html
post #7879 of 7912
What's the current verdict on salting eggplant? Everyone and their mother always tells you to salt it to pull out moisture and "draw out the bitterness" but I've not necessarily found eggplant au naturel to taste unpleasant to begin with. The biggest problem I have with eggplant is just how much oil it absorbs. And salting it usually just takes too long, makes it an unappealing brown color as it sits out, and usually just makes it taste too salty anyways.

Ottolenghi doesn't mention presalting in any of his recipes and seems to just roll with how much oil it absorbs, so can I consider the case closed?
post #7880 of 7912
Depends on whether or not you want to brown it or not. Toss with salt and microwave 6-8 min. Dries it own and makes it easy to brown.
post #7881 of 7912
How cheap is good vegan food? I know that the easy way would be to live on crisps and so on, but that'd hardly be nutritious. I'm set on going vegan some time this year.
post #7882 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunar View Post

How cheap is good vegan food? I know that the easy way would be to live on crisps and so on, but that'd hardly be nutritious. I'm set on going vegan some time this year.

Cheap. You're just taking relatively expensive things out of the equation. You can easily spend a lot going grilling a selection of veggies from WhoFo every day. But canned beans, some rice, a few fresh vegetables and fruits is pretty economical.

That's just the purchase price of your food, of course. Others can pontificate on health costs, happiness costs, and not coming across as an sanctimonious douche costs. And people I've known who were vegans took mineral and amino acid supplements to make up for some of what they were missing by excluding animal products.
post #7883 of 7912

Make sure you still get enough protein and other nutrients (cue GF/Hroi)

post #7884 of 7912
Seitan! Amazing in a hearty salad with a nice tart vinegarette and a mix of grains, cooked and raw vegetables. I eat it for lunch every day and I have no trouble hitting my protein goals.

Seitan

1 Bag (5 cups) Bob’s Red Mill vital wheat gluten flour
1 Cup nutritional yeast flakes
1 tbsp garlic powder
1 tbsp onion powder
Generous sprinkling of crushed black pepper
3 cup vegetable broth (particularly "Better than Bullion" no Chicken, no beef, or vegetable broth)
1.5 cup low sodium soy sauce
.75 c white vinegar
.25 c olive oil

In a large mixing bowl, mix the dry ingredients together. In another bowl, mix the wet ingredients together.
Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients (there will be more liquid than can be absorbed by the dough).
Knead the big dough ball in the bowl until a big mound of dough forms.
Cut dough into ~8 equal size pieces.
Knead each cutlet in the bowl with the excess broth to absorb as much broth as possible.
Reshape cutlets into “cutlet shape”
Arrange in 16x8 baking sheet and bake at 375* for 30-40 minutes, flipping once.
Each “cutlet” is 2 servings.

Nutrition per serving: 222 Calories, 5 g fat, 12 carbs, 36 g protein
post #7885 of 7912
I knew a guy who made very tasty seitan...but now he's a militant animal rights activist in the bay area, so I don't think I will get the opportunity to try it again. He was a vegan that didn't like vegetables...so he had to figure out how to make that work.
post #7886 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

You could add butter although I don't think most folks do. Standard approach would be to simmer the carcass with a few basic vegetables (onions, carrots, celery), a bit of salt and pepper (herbs like bay leaf or parsley depending on taste).

Five hours is a long time. Bring it all to a boil, reduce to simmer and cover, and give it a couple of hours. Taste.

Just please don't be a douche and call it "bone broth". smile.gif

Thank you! :-) What is it traditionally called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Here's all you'll ever need to know about making stock at home:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/10/how-to-make-rich-flavorful-easy-chicken-stock.html

Much thanks!
post #7887 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullrams View Post

Thank you! :-) What is it traditionally called?!
I was mostly kidding, but I would just call it chicken stock or chicken broth.
"Bone broth" is the new hipster terminlogy for people who want to upsell it as fancy artisanal food and/or portray it as some sort of innovative, miracle "bio-hack".
post #7888 of 7912
All good ideas. I think you need a combination of bones with a little meat, ie chicken carcasses if you can find them. Bones from a roast chicken give a deeper earthier flavor that lends itself well to certain kinds of darker flavored soups. Fresh bones though are wonderful for a multitude of things, parsley is a good add to the pot along with carrots and onion. Biggest single factor for a well flavored stock is the use of a pressure cooker. 20 min at pressure and you're done, nice clear deeply flavored broth. Thanks to Iammatt for this one.
post #7889 of 7912
In downtown Denver for a conference. Any decent suggestions for food?
post #7890 of 7912
As manton (rip in peace frown.gif ) would tell you slice and onion in half burn the cut part and then add it to the stock as it's cooking.
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