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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 520

post #7786 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Those of you who have food savers, would your recommend it? If you would do it over would you buy again? I'm starting to do sous vide and was wondering if I need a foodsaver, or if its not really necessary

I got a cheapo ebay surpluss closeout whatever foodsaver.

For the little that I paid, it seems worth it. Still, I used the ziploc bags for probably 50% of the things I have done sous vide (especially anything that was already going to have a liquid/butter in the bag, or that would give off a lot of juices...you don't need a perfect seal for that).

Foodsaver is still good for preserving food though...and as a bonus, you can use the sous vide machine to reheat it to precise temp. I used to reheat vaccuum sealed and frozen pulled pork in a water bath on the stove and just watch the temperature...now I just plug in the Anova.
post #7787 of 7912
I'd be using it mainly for my ANOVA, so I'll hold off and just use ziplocs, thanks
post #7788 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by t3hg0suazn View Post

Immersion blender: Breville or Bamix? I've read reviews going both ways.
Amazon also has some cheap Braun that requires an adapter for US use.
Bamix/ESGE Zauberstab is great if you can spare the dough.
post #7789 of 7912
Bamix sucks to clean/change the blades on. The Breville looks better in that regard.
post #7790 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

Bamix sucks to clean/change the blades on. The Breville looks better in that regard.
What? It's so simple, imo.
post #7791 of 7912
I'd prefer to be able to remove the stick from the motor.
post #7792 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

I'd prefer to be able to remove the stick from the motor.
TWSS
rimshot.gif
post #7793 of 7912
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

I'd prefer to be able to remove the stick from the motor.
Do you have a short stick? They come in different lengths.

The longer sticks are easy to work with. The shorter sticks can get a bit messy, as far as I can imagine (mine isn't short).
post #7794 of 7912
extra short
post #7795 of 7912

Where can I purchase one of these long sticks?

post #7796 of 7912
.
post #7797 of 7912
More sous vide questions.

I'm going to sous vide a whole NY Strip roast. I planned to salt well in advance, as I always do, but some sources on the net are insisting this is a bad idea with sous vide, and that it will give the meat a "cured" texture. I have salted in advance before, and I don't feel that there's been a problem, and I think that this sounds like a bit of interwebs BS, but I thought it was worth asking here.

Also, any advice on time for a NY Strip roast? I was thinking 4-5 hours would be plenty to achieve temp and would soften the meat to more of a roast-y texture, as opposed to a steak-y one, considering I've done low and slow NY strips for several hours in the oven at like 225 before. I can certainly plan to go longer - I can do damn near 24 hours (dinner not til Saturday) if that's the recommendation but I don't want to turn strip into mush. It's not like strip is the most tough piece of meat in the world.

Was planning to sear it off on a hot charcoal grill at the end, so was gonna do 130 expecting a few degrees rise from the sear.

Thoughts?
post #7798 of 7912
If anyone cares, I'll answer my own question. I went with 130F for something like 10 hours (10am til 8pm, give or take) and the texture was great. The meat was definitely nice and tender but still had enough chew to not be overly mushy. I did salt in advance and I don't feel that there was any negative effect that I could detect.

If there is a technical issue I am still puzzling over it is how to achieve a decent crust, particularly when flavorings are involved. I marinated the meat with a garlic-rosemary-olive oil crust in the bag to impart some flavor during marinating and cooking, but the problem is that this marinade absorbs water during the cooking process and therefore is not too friendly to searing. I finished the thing off on the grill and did get some decent browning in places but overall it was impossible to get a good crust all over the meat because of the way the meat wants to sit on the grill and, for example, the sides of the meat don't get crusted over. All in all, what crust there was was soggy and unappetizing.

It couldn't hold a candle to the great crust I can develop in an oven cooking of the same cut.
post #7799 of 7912
Doug, glad to hear you were happy with the sous vide results. For searing I start off by patting the meat totally dry with a paper towel. If I'm doing stovetop I toss it into a searing hot pan that has been wiped with a high flash point veg oil, i.e. not olive oil. Do each side 30 seconds, toss in a knob of butter, and 15-20 seconds a side x2 (total sear time under two minutes). The dry meat, searing hot pan and the butter are important to build that crust quickly and to minimize the grey zone. If a grill I pat dry, have grill searing hot, and do 20-30 seconds per side, flipping until I have a crust. Either coat the grate with veg oil and rub a touch on the meat.
post #7800 of 7912
1) Yo, foodguy, I thought you were retiring and
2) I think you are correct. Christopher Kimball wouldn't be out without good reason... but what?
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