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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 467

post #6991 of 7190
Have a thought for a duck recipe and wanted input plus cooking temp and time.

Sous vide a duck breast (temp and time help needed) then crisp skin quickly under broiler. Let cool and thinly slice. Lay slices on a rack, rack inside large bowl or baking pan with rim, cover with plastic wrap and fill with smoke from smoke gun. Think this will give good results?
post #6992 of 7190
seems a little precious. plus, would a sous vide properly render the fat from the breast?


just use the pan method. Manton explains it better.
post #6993 of 7190
You forget that I'm a little precious.
post #6994 of 7190
I fiddled with sous vide duck breast this summer. It can be a little tricky to get just right. It also depends on the type of duck you are cooking. A magret breast will require pre-rendering of fat prior to being placed in the bag, but with a leaner, Pekin breast, it is not as necessary (although it is nice for adding some flavor to the bag while it cooks). As far as time and temp, If I remember correctly, using 8oz Liberty Valley duck breasts, 57C for 45 minutes, then resting in the bag for 10 minutes, patting dry, and searing skin side down over a medium-high heat for 3-4 minutes, flip and sear for a few seconds more, then rest for an additional 10 minutes under foil.
Bad pic, but nice result:
AppleMark
post #6995 of 7190
Oh, and for what it's worth, I think cooking a magret sous vide is kind of useless. They are best cooked unilaterally on a low heat.
post #6996 of 7190
Thanks for the help. Hmm, Gomey might be right (god I hate saying that), and just pan cooking it might be best.
post #6997 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

charles phan's book on slanted door is good. so is anything from andrea nguyen.

Thank you!
post #6998 of 7190
a magret in the pan is about as perfect and foolproof a technique as there is. Season and score as far in advance as you can, start cold, go slow, sear the flesh side at the end, rest all the way down, then reheat, slice and serve. Use a very heavy bottom pan, I use my copper for that.
post #6999 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

a magret in the pan is about as perfect and foolproof a technique as there is. Season and score as far in advance as you can, start cold, go slow, sear the flesh side at the end, rest all the way down, then reheat, slice and serve. Use a very heavy bottom pan, I use my copper for that.

I remember you gave me the detailed technique for this but cannot find it as the search function seems a little buggy lately.
post #7000 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

a magret in the pan is about as perfect and foolproof a technique as there is. Season and score as far in advance as you can, start cold, go slow, sear the flesh side at the end, rest all the way down, then reheat, slice and serve. Use a very heavy bottom pan, I use my copper for that.
I always employed the technique you described in this post (found by googling "site:styleforum.net Manton magret duck breast sear"--L2Google, Piob! tongue.gif): Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

What I do is basically what kwilk/matt said. Score, season (well in advance if possible), chill unless you are cooking immediately but take out a good 30 minutes in advance so that when you start cooking, you cook a room temperature breast.


Start the duck in a cold pan, on m-low, no additional fat. Slowly render out the fat and spoon it out as you go. If you leave the fat in there, the breast will cook faster, the skin will get too dark, and you will have a leathery gray layer under the skin.


I go by touch and by sight. I want the skin crispy and a deep tan but not dark brown. The fat layer should be mostly gone. The flesh side should still look and feel raw. The top side should feel firm. It takes about 15-20 minutes to get to this point.


Turn pan to high, flip the breasts and sear on the underside for 1-2 minues or 3 at most for a really huge D'Artagnan magret.


Take them off heat and let them rest for a while. The juice will run pink. If you are making a sauce (and you should) pour this juice into to your sauce, up the heat and whisk.


The fond-filled pan can also be used to make a nice pan sauce, of which the varieties are endless.
The reheat part seems to be new. Details?
post #7001 of 7190
the reheat part is, at least every time I've cooked duck with Manton, basically done to save time during the actual dinner. The rendering takes a bit of time and attention, so done right before serving means the cook is in the kitchen while the guests are talking amongst themselves.
post #7002 of 7190
Oh, ok. I guess if time isn't an issue, not having to reheat it would be optimal. But good to know that it's a viable option.
post #7003 of 7190
No.
post #7004 of 7190
EXPLAIN!!!!!!
images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSG2PAZwp_epTy_WTlBQpHLcWgbmdMZXDu5ZmsBhEJc55ERQnfwSrqmlk47
post #7005 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

charles phan's book on slanted door is good. so is anything from andrea nguyen.

Recs on Thai books?
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