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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 421

post #6301 of 7222
My favorite soup is the lentils soup I've posted in the recipe thread. I worry that freezing it may not be the best idea though. You also need feta, coriander and spring onions, so it's nothing you can just defrost when you haven't planned it.

How about something like a simple leek soup, simmered in water with some potato, lightly mashed and seasoned with s&p and crème fraîche? Even better, a red beet soup -- especially good during the winter.
post #6302 of 7222
Dutch pea soup smile.gif
post #6303 of 7222
Googling "Dutch Pea Soup" just seems like asking for trouble for some reason.

Any bright ideas on what to do with the bone from a Serrano ham? I finally broke down and took my jamon off its stand yesterday - it had been around an embarrassingly long time and the mold growing on it and the hardness of certain parts that were drying out were making everyone too disgusted to eat it and sort of created a self-fulfilling situation. So I carved off the nasty parts and tried to harvest as much good meat as possible - actually turned out to be plenty, which I broke down into nice portions, vacuum sealed, and froze.

I now have two sections of bone - one still looks a little gnarly but the other was relatively unscathed by the mold. Easy answer is to flavor some lentils or beans (still time for some white bean stews or something before winter officially ends!) but didn't know if there were other bright ideas... or if maybe this is an idea to be avoided completely.
post #6304 of 7222
smile.gif You're right, probably not a good idea.

But you should give the soup a try sometime:

1rUvi.jpg
post #6305 of 7222
Ended up making a split pea soup from Cooks Illustrated.

They suggested doing a ham steak with a few slices of bacon. The place I was at actually had smoked ham hocks, but then I found these bags of bacon ends. Just a ton of trimmings from a nearby bacon producer...1.5 lbs of big thick chunks of pig.

After simmering, I trimmed the fat from the bacon (which was kind of a gelatinous mess) and diced the meat to go back in the soup.

End result was good, but these guys have a pretty strong hickory/maple flavor in their bacon which makes the soup a little different.
post #6306 of 7222
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

1) How had i not cooked/knowingly had short ribs before yesterday?
II) Is there a scientific/actual reason some foods get better the second day?
C) The braising sauce for my ribs is excellent but I don't think I will use it all with my meat. I don't want to throw it away, however. What can I do with it? Soup seems doable.
sorry ed. i have a hard time keeping up with the things you don't know.
there is an actual scientific reason braises get better, but i don't really remember what it is. probably has to do with redistribution of juices. also, be sure to take the opportunity to skim the congealed fat.
post #6307 of 7222
If a pickles recipe calls for so and so many vegetables, 800ml of brine and 100ml of vinegar such that the jar is filled to the top, should I scale both the brine and vinegar up if I use a bigger jar or just the brine? More importantly, does it actually have to be filled to the top or is it sufficient if the veggies are well covered?

Edit: I scaled up both to maintain the acidity. The veggies are covered and swim, it's not filled to the top though. If that's for some reason necessary, please do tell me.
Edited by b1os - 3/5/13 at 5:07pm
post #6308 of 7222
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

sorry ed. i have a hard time keeping up with the things you don't know.
there is an actual scientific reason braises get better, but i don't really remember what it is. probably has to do with redistribution of juices. also, be sure to take the opportunity to skim the congealed fat.

Here's a fool-proof method of determining if I know something: Does knowledge of it (whatever it may be) exist? If so then I don't know it. Basically, that's a roundabout way of saying I don't know anything (no Piob).
post #6309 of 7222
I have 1.5 lbs of flank steak that I want to marinate and eat Sunday night and I was going to follow the rule of thumb that the longer the meat marinates, the better (to a point, obviously).

However, I plan to add quite a bit of lime juice and from what I've read online, it says to avoid marinating for too long if the marinade is acidic, as it breaks down the meat to a mush.

Should I wait till Saturday night and marinate it for 24 hours? Or would it be okay to let the meat rest for 48 hours (i.e., marinate it tonight)?

FWIW, it's going to be a simple marinade:

- soy sauce
- cilantro
- jalapenos
- habaneros
- cilantro
- garlic
- ginger
- lime (juice and zest)
- olive oil
post #6310 of 7222
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

I have 1.5 lbs of flank steak that I want to marinate and eat Sunday night and I was going to follow the rule of thumb that the longer the meat marinates, the better (to a point, obviously).

However, I plan to add quite a bit of lime juice and from what I've read online, it says to avoid marinating for too long if the marinade is acidic, as it breaks down the meat to a mush.

Should I wait till Saturday night and marinate it for 24 hours? Or would it be okay to let the meat rest for 48 hours (i.e., marinate it tonight)?

FWIW, it's going to be a simple marinade:

- soy sauce
- cilantro
- jalapenos
- habaneros
- cilantro
- garlic
- ginger
- lime (juice and zest)
- olive oil

NO. JUST. NO.
Salt and pepper today. Wrap tightly and refrigerate. Put together the marinade and let the meat stand in it for an hour or so. pat dry and grill.
there's a lot of reasons, but briefly: marinades only penetrate the outer millimeter of the surface of the meat. longer marinades do not increase penetration. Plus, as you guessed, the acidity in that marinade will start to denature the protein on the surface of the meat. Finally, the flavors you're dealing with there are very bright and pointed. they will dull over time. (incidentally, i question the use of soy and ginger in this ... think it would be terrific without it.) (also cilantro ... because soft leafy herbs don't contribute a lot of flavor -- unless you include them with the meat on the grill, and then they tend to char)
post #6311 of 7222
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

NO. JUST. NO.
Salt and pepper today. Wrap tightly and refrigerate. Put together the marinade and let the meat stand in it for an hour or so. pat dry and grill.
there's a lot of reasons, but briefly: marinades only penetrate the outer millimeter of the surface of the meat. longer marinades do not increase penetration. Plus, as you guessed, the acidity in that marinade will start to denature the protein on the surface of the meat. Finally, the flavors you're dealing with there are very bright and pointed. they will dull over time. (incidentally, i question the use of soy and ginger in this ... think it would be terrific without it.) (also cilantro ... because soft leafy herbs don't contribute a lot of flavor -- unless you include them with the meat on the grill, and then they tend to char)

Oh, wow. Okay, I was way off-base -- thanks for course-correcting me.

So I plan to eat half of it on Sunday night and the second half on Monday night -- should I still salt and pepper it tonight and let it sit for two days? Will it get all watery and gooey while wrapped?

As for the marinate part, I'm assuming you're saying I should rest the meat in it an hour before cooking -- is that correct?

To sum up: salt and pepper now, prepare marinade and marinate the meat an hour before cooking.

As for the soy and ginger, I still fully plan on using them because, well.. I bought them shog[1].gif

The cilantro I'll probably add to the pan a couple minutes before taking the meat off.

Any other tips are much appreciated -- thanks again!

Edit: since I'm going to eat this twice, the first time I'm going to try the marinade with the ginger and the second time, without teacha.gif
post #6312 of 7222
Quote:
Originally Posted by irish-boB View Post

if you guys were making a pineapple ham how much mustard would you cover it with?
Less than twice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Oh, wow. Okay, I was way off-base -- thanks for course-correcting me.

So I plan to eat half of it on Sunday night and the second half on Monday night -- should I still salt and pepper it tonight and let it sit for two days? Will it get all watery and gooey while wrapped?

As for the marinate part, I'm assuming you're saying I should rest the meat in it an hour before cooking -- is that correct?

To sum up: salt and pepper now, prepare marinade and marinate the meat an hour before cooking.

As for the soy and ginger, I still fully plan on using them because, well.. I bought them shog[1].gif

The cilantro I'll probably add to the pan a couple minutes before taking the meat off.

Any other tips are much appreciated -- thanks again!

Edit: since I'm going to eat this twice, the first time I'm going to try the marinade with the ginger and the second time, without teacha.gif
You can always just slice the ginger up, or grind it, and make some tea with it. Soy sauce doesn't turn bad overnight either. And speaking of ginger and soy sauce... I'll have to make Ottolenghi's black pepper tofu recipe again soon. You should try it too. It's fantastic. http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Black-Pepper-Tofu-365129
post #6313 of 7222
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post


So I plan to eat half of it on Sunday night and the second half on Monday night -- should I still salt and pepper it tonight and let it sit for two days? Will it get all watery and gooey while wrapped?

As for the marinate part, I'm assuming you're saying I should rest the meat in it an hour before cooking -- is that correct?
i'd cook it all at once. cold steak is good. marinate in teh oil/etc for ano hour before cooking
post #6314 of 7222
Defrosting vaccum sealed meat in the fridge... remove from package or defrost in it?
post #6315 of 7222
I leave it in. It's very quickly thawed in cold water in the vac pack as well.
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