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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 417

post #6241 of 7325
Pressure cooker, and 50 or so minutes at full pressure.
post #6242 of 7325
^^
"Jewish penicillin":

http://www.nrcnext.nl/koken/2008/01/16/joodse-penicilline/
post #6243 of 7325
Thank you both. The recipe I tried didn't differ that much from the Jewish penicillin one, but I probably had the proportions wrong. I had one chicken and 4 liters of water ( a gallon). And next time I apparently should use the innards.
As they say, no guts; no glory.
post #6244 of 7325
I'm trying to braise my short ribs for tomorrow.

They called for adding a bottle of wine and reducing by half before adding stock, covering, and putting in the oven. Recipe said this should take about 25 minutes over medium heat.

After 25 minutes (with some pretty serious bubbling), it looked like nothing had moved. I turned on a bit more heat and another half hour later, it had still barely reduced. I figure some of this was from the onions on the bottom settling, allowing the ribs to sink further, and thus raising the water level...but this seems crazy, it just wasn't reducing. what am I doing wrong?

I was worried about ruining it if I continued to let it simmer/boil any longer, so I added some stock and put it in the oven. But the pot wouldn't have even had room for the full 4 cups of stock. I'm pretty sure I am using the exact same pot pictured in the recipe so it's not a too-small pot problem.
post #6245 of 7325
Has anyone ever baked with cloves before? I don't mind a touch of clove taste, but I dislike if it's too prominent (I just had a liver wurst at my grandma's that tasted like half of it were cloves).
Marcella Hazan's pear tart calls for a dozen cloves, as desired. They get dumped on top of the cake. So, has anyone baked with cloves before? What happens to their texture? Do they get less prominent in taste, or more? How much aroma do they release to their surroundings (i.e. can I just remove them after baking if I'm not too fond of the taste, or will the upper half of the cake still taste like clove)?
post #6246 of 7325
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I'm trying to braise my short ribs for tomorrow.

They called for adding a bottle of wine and reducing by half before adding stock, covering, and putting in the oven. Recipe said this should take about 25 minutes over medium heat.

After 25 minutes (with some pretty serious bubbling), it looked like nothing had moved. I turned on a bit more heat and another half hour later, it had still barely reduced. I figure some of this was from the onions on the bottom settling, allowing the ribs to sink further, and thus raising the water level...but this seems crazy, it just wasn't reducing. what am I doing wrong?

I was worried about ruining it if I continued to let it simmer/boil any longer, so I added some stock and put it in the oven. But the pot wouldn't have even had room for the full 4 cups of stock. I'm pretty sure I am using the exact same pot pictured in the recipe so it's not a too-small pot problem.

I would not worry about it. Just reduce the liquid post-braise for a nice thick sauce. Don't forget to skim the fat.
post #6247 of 7325
About how long will fresh pigeon heart/livers keep in a cold refrigerator?
post #6248 of 7325
How much meat is in a 4oz cold water lobster tail?
post #6249 of 7325
there's not much waste. just shell. i'd figure 3 1/2 ounces, or about 1 serving.
post #6250 of 7325
Are abate fetel pears as well suited for baking as are bosc pears, or will they get too soft?
post #6251 of 7325
They're good for baking as they tend to be more crisp.
post #6252 of 7325
Master Stocks - how do these work? In theory I guess since everything is boiled (or constantly boiling?) it's sanitary but I would just think it would get, I dunno, is rancid the right word? Nasty. I mean, you have a bone or scrap of meat in there that's boiling and boiling, and might not be scooped out or whatever for months, no? Or are these things regularly and thoroughly strained??

????
post #6253 of 7325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

They're good for baking as they tend to be more crisp.
Thanks. I agree. Texture is great. The only downside is the length if you slice it, so I had to carefully place each slice by hand for the bottom layer since otherwise cavities are a given (hardly any dough). The cake (Marcella Hazan's peart tart) is fantastic. I also used the dozen cloves, the flavour isn't too prominent and works well. Highly recommended.


post #6254 of 7325
Are tinned chickpeas fine or will the texture be better when you soak and cook them yourself?
post #6255 of 7325
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Are tinned chickpeas fine or will the texture be better when you soak and cook them yourself?

i've never cooked them mostly because I've always been happy with the texture of canned.


the chickpea crostini at Babbo is drool.gif
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