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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 406

post #6076 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Herbert View Post

That makes sense as it lines up with how i've seen it described in other places but in this case it says:

"Bone 1.25kg shoulder of veal and the same amount of knuckle of veal. Tie them together with string and brush with melted dripping. Crush 500g veal bones as finely as possible. Brown all these ingredients in a large flameproof casserole or saucepan. Peel and slice 150g carrots and 100g onions, then add the to the pan. Cover and leave t sweat for 15 minutes. Add 250mL water and reduce to a jelly like consistency..."

It really sounds like they expect the veal bones to be broken up quite a lot. My butcher usually just cuts them into 1 or 2 inch lengths for me.

I wouldn't worry about it. If you are trying to make a stock, 2 inch pieces will be adequate. A sauce or a jus, you can just use some diced shoulder meat, loin scraps, etc, brown them and then deglaze with some stock or water.
post #6077 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Mortar or pepper/salt grinder, I guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

+1
remember that a good part of the impact of those specialty salts is from the shape of the crystal and the way that releases the flavor. so don't grind it too fine and only use it as a finishing salt ... once it dissolves, there's not much difference between regular salt and $20 a pound stuff.

Thanks, guys... I know that the shape of the crystal is what gets you the special mouthfeel, and yeah I'm aware just to finish with it. I guess that's why I asked - wasn't sure if there are special ways to grind to break it into the right shape or whatever.

I got my Edge Pro in the mail today!
post #6078 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Who makes/imports really good dried chorizo?
there's a really great producer here in southern california, it's called la espanola, or dona juanas (one's the corporate/store name, the other is the name for the line of fermented sausages). great products. and they've been around since before spanish was cool -- like 30 years and counting.
post #6079 of 7347
tienda.com is my go-to for most Spanish foods that I can't find in the usual markets, including the bone-in jamon Serrano that's still on my counter, but I don't know if they'd meet your artisanal requirements.
post #6080 of 7347
Thanks, I will check them out. I've tried the Palacios which I thought was okay, but that store no longer carries it. Chorizo is not commonly found around here, and while I dislike the idea of getting my sausage through the mail, I have started making paella quite often, so I am in the need of a good source.
post #6081 of 7347
why would you use dried chorizo for paella?
post #6082 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

tienda.com is my go-to for most Spanish foods that I can't find in the usual markets, including the bone-in jamon Serrano that's still on my counter, but I don't know if they'd meet your artisanal requirements.

Their peregrino chorizo is delicious.
post #6083 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

why would you use dried chorizo for paella?
i think by dried he means "fermented". the terms are used interchangeably. and, of course, there is a world of difference between Spanish chorizo (mostly dried sausages) and mexican chorizo (more like a fresh country sausage). here's a link to la espanola's dried sausages. until a couple of years ago, when importation from spain was allowed, they supplied almost all of the chorizo for spanish table and la tienda.
post #6084 of 7347
I love chorizo. I have been on a bit of a kick.
post #6085 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I love chorizo. I have been on a bit of a kick.
in before neo.
post #6086 of 7347
It saddens me that I can't find good stuff locally. I'd like to eat things that are made around here, and I do try my best to be a good little locavore, but most of the local sausage/charcuterie type stuff around here really blows the big one. There is one guy making some excellent bacon, but that is pretty much it. California is probably better for this sort of stuff.
post #6087 of 7347
epicerie boulud
post #6088 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

It saddens me that I can't find good stuff locally. I'd like to eat things that are made around here, and I do try my best to be a good little locavore, but most of the local sausage/charcuterie type stuff around here really blows the big one. There is one guy making some excellent bacon, but that is pretty much it. California is probably better for this sort of stuff.
it was one of those strictly accidental things. they moved to california from spain and the wife had nothing to do so she started experimenting with making sausages. then she started importing spanish products (mainly canned fish stuff, conservas -- really excellent). then she pushed the spanish sausage stuff until it got really, really good. it was still basically a subsistence business for years. they still have this tiny little storefront (with a huge meat operation behind it) and she comes in every saturday to make paella that they sell. for any socal folks, it's a must-visit.
post #6089 of 7347
Thanks for the chorizo info. Still not sure I understand what fermented vs. cured means, but I also googled around and learned that "authentic" paella uses the cured kind, and not the fresh kind like I've often used in the past. Who knew?

Now that I'm noting the details, even tienda sells a "semi-cured" "cooking" chorizo (scare quotes for their terms) that appears to be different than the hard salami-like stuff.

Color me confused. I guess my paellas using Mexican-style sausage aren't authentic. With that said, they're still pretty yummy. Though I do struggle a bit with getting the rice nailed.

Thanks to all for the EdgePro advice. A great device, I got mine yesterday, and sharpened three knives. Amazing how long it took to work up a burr though, particularly on my Wusthofs. I guess they were really in bad shape.

Now, a real question:

Can someone settle the record on ceramic vs. steel hones? All kinds of conflicting and nonsensical info on the internet. What are the salient differences? Which should I be using for my knives?
post #6090 of 7347
Thread Starter 
AFAIK, cured usually refers to whole cuts of meat cured with salt and left to dry. Fermented typically speaks more to sausages and salumi, which in America are typically inoculated with special bacteria (bactoferm, etc) to raise the pH and drop the water activity quickly in order to make them safe to eat "raw." In Europe, again, AFAIK, the inoculation typically doesn't occur because specific regions have the right atmosphere to make the style of sausage they do without the addition.
Fermented sausages are dry-cured to the point that each sausage requiresas in some sausages get dried to about 2% moisture levels (dried chorizo) whereas spreadable fermented sausages may have 10% or more of their moisture.
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