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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 401

post #6001 of 7132
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post


Ha. It so happens that they are older, upper-east-side ladies, so I guess it works out.

i feel like we all knew this.
post #6002 of 7132
I don't think there's anything stuffy or dated about pouring soups/sauces tableside. It is more for functionality than anything else. Pouring a liquid soup into shallow consommé bowls, then walking with it in both hands could get messy, I'd imagine.
post #6003 of 7132
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I don't think there's anything stuffy or dated about pouring soups/sauces tableside. It is more for functionality than anything else. Pouring a liquid soup into shallow consommé bowls, then walking with it in both hands could get messy, I'd imagine.
didn't mean to imply that it was fussy or dated. i think it's very practical. it's also just the kind of very simple, little thing that would give a little theater to the dinner, which i think your audience would appreciate.
post #6004 of 7132
I like soups served tableside for the reason you mention. I think it goes double for inexperienced servers, to wit it is easier to pour from a pitcher than to skillfully walk two soup bowls across a room.

That said, I hate the new trend of chefs showing up at the table to spoon over a sauce or pour soup. I don't know what to do with them when they get there. They all stare expectantly, and I kind of want them to leave quickly so that I can eat my food. It's an odd thing.

In this case, though, it might not be a bad solution. If you are more comfortable in your skill pouring, do it. But be clean, keep moving and try your hardest to stay out of any awkward situations which come from people talking to you. You'll do fine.


Best story on this -- we were at Manresa several months ago and the chef came by to pour something about 2/3 of the way through dinner. We told him everything had been great (true) and he awkwardly said they still had time to screw up. Everything from that point on was screwed up. Sadly, the next time I saw him he was buying questionable, out of season asparagus at the Point Reyes corner grocery in August talking about celebrity farmers.
post #6005 of 7132
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

didn't mean to imply that it was fussy or dated. i think it's very practical. it's also just the kind of very simple, little thing that would give a little theater to the dinner, which i think your audience would appreciate.

Ah, I misread that post. I wouldn't want to do it myself, though. I like staying in the kitchen. I'll just have the girls practice with a pitcher of water or something.
post #6006 of 7132
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I understand your sentiment, but I still think the idea of that much money is absurd. If I can find someone who is willing to do the job at a fraction of the cost, yet still perform at a specific standard, that is the route I am going to take.
Ha. It so happens that they are older, upper-east-side ladies, so I guess it works out.
Yeah. I'm not saying their desired rate is proper in this case.
Edited by Cary Grant - 1/11/13 at 5:50am
post #6007 of 7132
Put an ad up on Craigslist. You'll be able to find two experienced people to work for $30 an hour in no time.
post #6008 of 7132
I'll cook a Turkish lamb stew. I also have some lamb bones but I'm unsure whether to use them or not. If I do, I put them in a pot with cold water, bring to a boil and let boil for 10 minutes, maybe repeat, to get rid of the scum... right? Anyhoo, would you use the lamb bones or just dump them?
post #6009 of 7132
Make a stock out of them. Why are you blanching bones?
post #6010 of 7132
Ok, thanks. I thought I've read multiple times that you should blanch (some?) bones prior to using them to remove scum. Maybe my memories are faulty though.
post #6011 of 7132
Robuchon calls for blanching bones in white stocks like chicken and veal. You should roast stuff like beef and lamb though.
post #6012 of 7132
Makes sense. Merci. Need to finally read the Sauces cookbook... unfortunately it's out of reach at the moment, else I'd have looked it up.
post #6013 of 7132
I have a lot of bergamot, which I love, right now but I'm not going to be eating at home for some nights and therefore will not be able to enjoy it. How to preserve? Jam, salted, in syrup? Ideas? Experiences?
post #6014 of 7132
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I have a lot of bergamot, which I love, right now but I'm not going to be eating at home for some nights and therefore will not be able to enjoy it. How to preserve? Jam, salted, in syrup? Ideas? Experiences?

Would think it would make a great sorbet. And make some marmalade... and send me a jar. wink.gif
post #6015 of 7132
I found these guys mixed in with my little shrimpies. Anyone know what they are?
AppleMark
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