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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 398

post #5956 of 7382
Had some spicy lamb's tongue tacos the other day. Great texture and were in crispy bite sized pieces. Anyone have a recipe that might yield me similar results? I can think of several dishes they would be a great protein for once I can prepare them.
post #5957 of 7382
Tried out the stone with a no-name santoku I didn't care about.

Spent quite a while on the 250 side setting the back bevel, cleaned it up with the 1000, and then sharpened the 20 degree side.

I need to get a smooth steel (gently used the back of another knife I don't care about instead of using my ribbed steel), but otherwise I think I did pretty well. Will have to work on getting the right angles and locking my wrist in place, but I think this knife now cuts better than it ever has.
post #5958 of 7382
from what i understand its better to use a extremely high grit stone than a steel.
post #5959 of 7382
To prick or not to prick? I made a roast duck with spiced honey glaze receipe and it didn't call for pricking the skin to help render fat. Skin turned out a bit soggy but lots of fat was rendered and the meat wasn't at all greasy. What do you guys do?
post #5960 of 7382
Quote:
Originally Posted by shibbel View Post

To prick or not to prick? I made a roast duck with spiced honey glaze receipe and it didn't call for pricking the skin to help render fat. Skin turned out a bit soggy but lots of fat was rendered and the meat wasn't at all greasy. What do you guys do?

You're going to find a number of pricks in here
post #5961 of 7382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

You're going to find a number of pricks in here

You talking about SF or your bunghole?
post #5962 of 7382
What happens to all the serviceware when a fine dining restaurant goes belly up? All the Christofle silver, the crystal, all the porcelain, the Staub stuff - do these ever go to public auction or do inside people scoop them up before anyone else finds out?
post #5963 of 7382
What happens to all the serviceware when a fine dining restaurant goes belly up? All the Christofle silver, the crystal, all the porcelain, the Staub stuff - do these ever go to public auction or do inside people scoop them up before anyone else finds out?
post #5964 of 7382
Think it usually gets auctioned to help pay off creditors. That or the staff steals it.
post #5965 of 7382
I'd imagine that the majority of places using Christofle silver and Staub are owned by hotels or restaurant groups, and when they close they probably wait for the next opening, likely in the same spot.
post #5966 of 7382
post #5967 of 7382
xposting from the "Things you don't get" thread:

When did "Cookie" become the singular form of "Cookies"?

I'm reading the instructions for a vintage Mirro "Cooky and Pastry Press" and the recipes always use "Cooky" as the singular form....things like "When making cookies, turn handle until each cooky is formed. Then lift press and cooky will cut off".

We don't say Pastrie...so why do we say Cookie?
post #5968 of 7382
Where's Fang when you need him?
post #5969 of 7382
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

What happens to all the serviceware when a fine dining restaurant goes belly up? All the Christofle silver, the crystal, all the porcelain, the Staub stuff - do these ever go to public auction or do inside people scoop them up before anyone else finds out?

I have a buddy who used to work for a company that would buy/acquire that stuff and then sell it to other restaurants.
post #5970 of 7382
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

xposting from the "Things you don't get" thread:
When did "Cookie" become the singular form of "Cookies"?
I'm reading the instructions for a vintage Mirro "Cooky and Pastry Press" and the recipes always use "Cooky" as the singular form....things like "When making cookies, turn handle until each cooky is formed. Then lift press and cooky will cut off".
We don't say Pastrie...so why do we say Cookie?
false analogy. from wiki (so much more convenient than the OED):
Quote:
Its American name derives from the Dutch word koekje or (informal) koekie which means little cake, and arrived in American English through the Dutch in North America.
According to the Scottish National Dictionary, its Scottish name derives from the diminutive form (+ suffix -ie) of the word cook, giving the Middle Scots cookie, cooky or cu(c)kie. It also gives an alternative etymology, from the Dutch word koekje, the diminutive of koek, a cake. There was much trade and cultural contact across the North Sea between the Low Countries and Scotland during the Middle Ages, which can also be seen in the history of curling and, perhaps, golf.

so the vintage mirro cooky press was actually a misspelling.
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