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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 392

post #5866 of 7385
Nice.

So, rolled out a pork shoulder again. I cannot get the temps on these fuckers down. Today's was all over the fucking place, so I settled around 168 (shooting for 170) but then when I took it out some of the other spots, especially around the outside and thinner sections, were over 180. If I was going to shoot for a middle ground here - cooking the interior of the pork close to 170 but not cooking the shit out of the outside - what center temp should I shoot for?
post #5867 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

i see. we got fish filets without anything to debone. using the knives were really awkward

How was it?
post #5868 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

Nice.
So, rolled out a pork shoulder again. I cannot get the temps on these fuckers down. Today's was all over the fucking place, so I settled around 168 (shooting for 170) but then when I took it out some of the other spots, especially around the outside and thinner sections, were over 180. If I was going to shoot for a middle ground here - cooking the interior of the pork close to 170 but not cooking the shit out of the outside - what center temp should I shoot for?
you're not going to get a consistent temp throughout. unless you do something like sous-vide it.
post #5869 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkI View Post

My roommate insists on buying buys of chicken breasts, and as he can't cook for shit he always asks me to "invent" something to do with them. I've found that letting them sit overnight rubbed in some mayo, herbs and hotsauce, then baking them for like a half hour at 350 degrees turns out a pretty decent result.
Probably to low brow for this thread, but hey.

Stuff it with cheese or wrap it in bacon.
post #5870 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

you're not going to get a consistent temp throughout. unless you do something like sous-vide it.

I know. So what should I be aiming for? Slightly undercooked in the center and more around 170 on the outsides, or 170 in the center and overcooked (180+) on the outsides?
post #5871 of 7385
How much the core temperature rises while it rests depends on a lot of factors. Trial and error and ultimately experience will be the only answer. Aim for 160 core, see what happens. Adjust next time. And so on.
post #5872 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkI View Post

My roommate insists on buying buys of chicken breasts, and as he can't cook for shit he always asks me to "invent" something to do with them. I've found that letting them sit overnight rubbed in some mayo, herbs and hotsauce, then baking them for like a half hour at 350 degrees turns out a pretty decent result.
Probably to low brow for this thread, but hey.

Eh, I'll buy bags of frozen chicken breasts at costco. If I am in a pinch, I will thaw one in it's vac-pac in a bowl of water. Then I will pound it down until it is thinner and a more uniform thickness, dry it off, rub with salt and pepper or pick and choose some other things like cumin, thyme, various rubs/seasonings that people give me as gifts (where else am I going to use a big thing of cajun seasning that is probably 1/3 salt).
If you pan fry it right, you can still get a nice texture with it. Combine with some frozen peas or something and you've got a reasonably healthy meal that took very little time and was made from ingredients that were in your freezer and thus bought far in advance and almost always on hand.

Certainly not my favorite thing in the world, but there's probably a reason I'm pinched for time, and that reason would probably prevent me from caring too much about how good the food is. Healthier and cheaper than ordering a pizza or stocking up on nasty frozen entrees.
post #5873 of 7385
Rambo, it sounds like you are concentrating on achieving a certain temperature than on having a tasty pork shoulder. What aren't you getting? At 170 or 180 or 160 it is fully cooked. If you want it more tender, turn the oven down to 175 when it gets to 160 and leave it for another hour, then crank it up to crisp if you like. The bigger difference between oven temp and target temp, the bigger difference between outside and inside temp on the meat. Also, the collagen softens
As a function of time and temp, which is why you might get your result if you bring it up to your temperature then hold it there for a while.
post #5874 of 7385
what mattsaid. personally, i don't like the taste of underdone pork (and i realize that puts me in the minority these days). at about 160 you can really taste a difference, which is why i rarely cook chops anymore, because they tend to dry out at that temp. with a pork butt, you're going to be in good shape anywhere from 170 to 185 or so. there's enough fat and collagen to keep it relatively moist. i'd also add to matt's prescription that the lower the oven temperature, the less difference there is between the outside of the meat and the center. (the more evenly cooked it will be).
post #5875 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

i'd also add to matt's prescription that the lower the oven temperature, the less difference there is between the outside of the meat and the center. (the more evenly cooked it will be).

Definitely. Take a look at the Serious Eats food lab--they have done several articles on this, testing temps to figure out the best way to get the most even temperature throughout, while still having a nicely browned exterior. Basically, cook it low and slow, then take it out, crank the oven, and give it a bit more time at the high temp to brown it.
post #5876 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Definitely. Take a look at the Serious Eats food lab--they have done several articles on this, testing temps to figure out the best way to get the most even temperature throughout, while still having a nicely browned exterior. Basically, cook it low and slow, then take it out, crank the oven, and give it a bit more time at the high temp to brown it.
or you could just read the f*ing los angeles times.
nod[1].gif
seriously, there's quite a bit of work that's been done on the question of both cooking temperature and doneness temperature (google scholar is your friend). generally, the lower the temperature, the more even the cooking and the juicier the meat (more moisture retained). Pork temp is a matter of taste, but food scientists recognize a quality that they call alternately "metallic" or "serum-y" in pork cooked to less than, say, 155 (going by memory).
post #5877 of 7385
I do t like underdone pork either.
post #5878 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I do t like underdone pork either.
my br tha.
post #5879 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Rambo, it sounds like you are concentrating on achieving a certain temperature than on having a tasty pork shoulder. What aren't you getting? At 170 or 180 or 160 it is fully cooked. If you want it more tender, turn the oven down to 175 when it gets to 160 and leave it for another hour, then crank it up to crisp if you like. The bigger difference between oven temp and target temp, the bigger difference between outside and inside temp on the meat. Also, the collagen softens
As a function of time and temp, which is why you might get your result if you bring it up to your temperature then hold it there for a while.

Well, apparently, I was under the mistaken impression that 170 was the target temp for doneness, so that its not undercooked. That's why I was shooting for it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

what mattsaid. personally, i don't like the taste of underdone pork (and i realize that puts me in the minority these days). at about 160 you can really taste a difference, which is why i rarely cook chops anymore, because they tend to dry out at that temp. with a pork butt, you're going to be in good shape anywhere from 170 to 185 or so. there's enough fat and collagen to keep it relatively moist. i'd also add to matt's prescription that the lower the oven temperature, the less difference there is between the outside of the meat and the center. (the more evenly cooked it will be).

Oddly enough, I think I prefer the 350 method over the 250 method. I think the higher temp does a better job at breaking down the collagen. Its less chewy and has more depth of flavor.
post #5880 of 7385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

Oddly enough, I think I prefer the 350 method over the 250 method. I think the higher temp does a better job at breaking down the collagen. Its less chewy and has more depth of flavor.
if you're happy, i'm happy. but i think what you're tasting is browning ... which can also be achieved at the lower temp by finishing at a high heat.
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