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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 389

post #5821 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

its almost time for more chicken. can anyone help me out with this one please?
don't overthink. no offense, but the stuff you're cooking isn't rocket science. it's going to turn out whether you stagger the sheets and add 25 degrees or not. (that said, 400 is a better temp for chicken; just be sure the exhaust fan is turned on).
post #5822 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

don't overthink. no offense, but the stuff you're cooking isn't rocket science. it's going to turn out whether you stagger the sheets and add 25 degrees or not. (that said, 400 is a better temp for chicken; just be sure the exhaust fan is turned on).

none taken. i wasn't exactly trying to go all food science on this. i could always just poke around in there but I figured i'd run it by you guys first just to see.

out of curiosity, why do you say 400 is a better temp for chicken?
post #5823 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

none taken. i wasn't exactly trying to go all food science on this. i could always just poke around in there but I figured i'd run it by you guys first just to see.
out of curiosity, why do you say 400 is a better temp for chicken?
you get crisper, browner skin (do arrange the pieces skin-side up).
post #5824 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

you get crisper, browner skin (do arrange the pieces skin-side up).

boneless skinless breasts. still make a difference?
post #5825 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

boneless skinless breasts. still make a difference?
jesus god man, are you trying to torture me? if you insist on eating those things, just stick them in the microwave. cooking can neither hurt nor help them.
post #5826 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

boneless skinless breasts. still make a difference?

Dude, this is a chicken, just sayin.

post #5827 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

jesus god man, are you trying to torture me? if you insist on eating those things, just stick them in the microwave. cooking can neither hurt nor help them.

Seriously, no reason at all to cook a skinless breast in an oven.

A whole roasted chicken is probably the world's most perfect dish IMO.
post #5828 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

jesus god man, are you trying to torture me? if you insist on eating those things, just stick them in the microwave. cooking can neither hurt nor help them.

Listen, I gotta cook 12 of these fucking things in one shot. If you have some other way of doing it I'm all ears.
post #5829 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

Listen, I gotta cook 12 of these fucking things in one shot. If you have some other way of doing it I'm all ears.

Breasts without skin lose moisture quickly. Oven is your best shot after a brief browning in a hot pan to seal.

I think 325 is a better temp if you brown and cover with foil over. Otherwise you get some dry shit. Also, its ok to brown in a very hot pan and then use the oven later. Noting says you cant pause unless you get too deep in the cooking process. Browning in a pan, with chx, should not be more than 20 secs on either side.
post #5830 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Seriously, no reason at all to cook a skinless breast in an oven.

Fail.

I'll back Rambo once again in the 100% validity and need for lean protein as part of a person's diet based on weightlifting and very specific macros... 99% of the world doesn't get that, especially a threak that's more about suspensions of micro kale foam with jellied truffle than food as fuel, and that's fine.

Rambo- I've given up on trying to liven up skinless chicken breasts--- I cook a large sheet at a time, baked, low temp... around 325 for however long... if they're frozen, something like 50 minutes gets them done without overcooking.
I almost always eat them cubed up into greens (beans, salads, spinach) of some sort so that's where the flavor comes from. I save the gourmet for eating out and treats (though lately i've been much more about treats than macros shog[1].gif )
post #5831 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

Listen, I gotta cook 12 of these fucking things in one shot. If you have some other way of doing it I'm all ears.

1 part cooking sake
1/4 part mirin
1 part water
1 tablespoon of soy sauce per cup of liquid
1 teaspoon of sugar per cup of liquid
1 small daikon radish, per pound of chicken cut into about 2 cm rounds
Thinly sliced stalk of green onion for garnish.


You need enough liquid to completely cover the other ingredients. If you don't have a big enough pot do it in batches reserving the liquid.

Add chicken, liquids, sugar to a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce to a low simmer and add the daikon. Cover with a lid and simmer for 30 ~ 40 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. Top up with water to cover as needed. The daikon and chicken should be brown and tender.

Serve in a bowl with some of the broth and green onions.
post #5832 of 7347
How about making Torihamu? : http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Torihamu

Or a simple brine?

Or do a cheap version of sous vide. Wrapped in plastic wrap and then a freezer bag.
post #5833 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

I mean, there is a ton of dairy in egg nog. I'd assume anything with an expiration date longer than about a week is super-duper-mega pasteurized, in which case it's not worth the calories anyways.
Jeffrey Morgenthaler just aged his egg nog for quite some time, fwiw. One year.
post #5834 of 7347
Quote:
Noix de saint-jacques
Extraire les noix de saint-jacques de leur coquille et les nettoyer sous un fi let
d’eau, puis les sécher à l’aide d’un linge. Réserver au frais.

Truffes
Bien laver les truffes en les brossant, puis les sécher sur un linge propre.
Les éplucher délicatement. Réserver les parures pour la purée.

Purée de truffes
Placer les parures de truffes dans une casserole, mouiller à hauteur de fond blanc de
volaille. Cuire à couvert à feu doux pendant 20 minutes. Mixer la préparation afi n
d’obtenir une purée, incorporer le beurre en pommade, assaisonner de sel et de poivre
du moulin.

Mousseline de racines de persil
Laver, éplucher les racines de persil. Découper en brunoise. Placer dans une casserole,
recouvrir d’eau froide avec une pincée de gros sel. Égoutter à la première ébullition,
replacer dans la casserole avec la crème fl eurette et couvrir à hauteur avec de l’eau.
Cuire à couvert jusqu’à l’obtention d’une texture fondante. Bien égoutter, mixer,
incorporer le beurre, rectifi er l’assaisonnement de sel et de poivre du moulin.
Passer la mousseline au tamis.

Finition et présentation
À l’aide de deux emporte-pièce de forme ronde de 5 cm et 1 cm de diamètre, détailler
18 disques de pain de mie fraîchement toasté afi n d’obtenir des toasts melba.
Tailler les truffes en julienne. Réchauffer la purée de truffes. Réchauffer la mousseline
de racines de persil, incorporer la crème montée. Rectifi er les assaisonnements.
À l’aide d’un emporte-pièce de forme ronde de la même taille que les noix de saintjacques, tailler des rouelles de pain de mie. Dans une poêle, mettre le beurre clarifi é.
Disposer les noix de saint-jacques assaisonnées de sel sur une rouelle de pain de mie.
Débuter la cuisson côté pain, cuire pendant 1 minute. Retourner délicatement pour
terminer la cuisson de l’autre côté pendant 1 minute, en arrosant sans cesse.
Égoutter sur grille.
Disposer en quinconce 3 cuillerées de mousseline de racines de persil et 3 cuillerées de
purée de truffes. Déposer sur la mousseline de racines de persil 3 noix de saint-jacques,
en plaçant le toast melba vers le haut et la julienne de truffe au-dessus. Placer au centre
la salade aux herbes préalablement lavée et assaisonnée d’huile d’olive, de sel et de
poivre du moulin.

For those that read French, I was wondering if this recipe mentions cooking temps? I'm mainly wondering about proper method for cooking the scallops.
post #5835 of 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by shibbel View Post

For those that read French, I was wondering if this recipe mentions cooking temps? I'm mainly wondering about proper method for cooking the scallops.
Nope, no cooking temperatures. I'd guess medium to high.
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