or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Random Food Questions Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Random Food Questions Thread - Page 388

post #5806 of 7342
I'm not talking commercial grade...I am talking the sub $50 hand crank ones (like a #8 or a #10). They grind meat pretty fast so unless you are grinding an entire deer you just shot, you won't really spend that much time cranking.



The only problem is that while they look identical to the vintage grinders (and probably come from the same molds), the quality control is really low nowadays as reflected in the amazon reviews. So that leaves a few options--do the return dance with amazon until you get a good one, buy from a store where you can check it out first, or find a vintage one somewhere. But really, the one pictured is $20 so its not that big a deal if you have to exchange one.

They are nice because they are solid metal and will stay ice cold while grinding your meat (which is important for most things).

edit: and a #10 is preferred to a #8 apparently. A little bigger, and identical to a #12 (the bolt-down instead of clamp-on version) which is a common electric size and thus there are a ton of replacement plates and blades for sale.
Edited by otc - 11/27/12 at 1:15pm
post #5807 of 7342
Thanks for the advice. I'll look more in to the hand crank versions, but like you said, the reviews kind of scared me off of those. It sounds like the best bet is to see if I can find a vintage hand crank one?
post #5808 of 7342
Maybe not even vintage but just buy one on ebay that has been opened and assembled (even if they never used it). That will let you know that all of the parts are there and that there are no casting errors (things that don't fit or places where the coating didn't stick).

Or buy it from a shop...places like Cabelas probably sell them, and even walmart lists them on their website (haven't been in a walmart in years so I can't say if they would have them in store...Target certainly doesn't)

edit: although don't look too hard because I am trying to buy one too now that you got me to take a peek at ebay!
One thing to note--especially for the #10/#12 units, new plates/blades/stuffers are readily available although they seem to start at about $10 a piece. So a unit with 4 different plates in good shape is a better deal than one that only has a single plate.
Edited by otc - 11/28/12 at 9:25am
post #5809 of 7342
I bought another cooling rack and cookie sheet to cook chicken in the oven with today. If i put two sheets in the oven how should I space them out in the oven? One rack on top of the other, or should I put one closer to the top and one closer to the bottom?

As to temp, should I increase it slightly (say from 375 to 400) to make up for the extra chicken, or leave it at the same temp but just give it longer to cook?
post #5810 of 7342
How long can eggnog be stored? I still have a bottle from a local producer that for whatever reason (it's Germany after all) does not have an expiry date printed on it. Likewise, a bottle from a very big producer (Verpoorten) doesn't have one either. It just states that the opened bottle should be consumed in 6 months while kept in the fridge. I can therefore assume that 1.5 years doesn't matter as long as the bottle is closed, right?
post #5811 of 7342
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

How long can eggnog be stored? I still have a bottle from a local producer that for whatever reason (it's Germany after all) does not have an expiry date printed on it. Likewise, a bottle from a very big producer (Verpoorten) doesn't have one either. It just states that the opened bottle should be consumed in 6 months while kept in the fridge. I can therefore assume that 1.5 years doesn't matter as long as the bottle is closed, right?

I mean, there is a ton of dairy in egg nog. I'd assume anything with an expiration date longer than about a week is super-duper-mega pasteurized, in which case it's not worth the calories anyways.
post #5812 of 7342
Thanks, mom.
post #5813 of 7342
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Thanks, mom.

No problem! smile.gif
post #5814 of 7342
I will be preparing a whole fresh ham this weekend. I usually score the skin, season with S&P and a bit of fresh thyme, and baste a few times with white wine during the cooking process. It always comes out great, with nice cracklings of skin and tender, juicy meat.

I was considering bumping it up a little this time by brining in advance with some added flavorings. I figured the best technique would be to simply brine in a cooler filled with iced brine, saving refrig space while accomplishing the task.

Any thoughts or advice on this? Anything about the brining that might, I dunno, hydrate the skin and prevent it from crisping? Seems like that shouldn't be possible, but it's the kind of thing I tend to learn, the hard way, come serving time. And will the thing be adequately flavored with a 2-3 day brine? (Some stuff I am reading suggests 1 day per 2 lbs. of meat, which would mean like a week or more for a nice big bone-in fresh ham But my court-appointed therapist tells me not to believe everything I read on the internet.) Can brine penetrate the skin or should I score before brining?

Appreciate any contributions, thanks.
post #5815 of 7342
haven't done this so take it with a grain of, er, ...
i would score the skin before brining
i think 3-4 days should be sufficient
i would give the pork a full day in the fridge uncovered to dry out thoroughly before roasting.
honestly, though, i wouldn't brine at all unless you feel really compelled. roast it low and slow (like 250-300 degrees) and it'll be incredibly moist. then crank up the heat at the end as high as it iwll go for hte last 15 minutes to crisp the skin. best pork you'll ever taste and couldn't be easier.
post #5816 of 7342
What's the reasoning with curved trussing needles versus straight?
post #5817 of 7342
Quote:
Originally Posted by shibbel View Post

What's the reasoning with curved trussing needles versus straight?

To go under the neck easily. But if you buy a straight one, it will be curved after a few uses going around the neck.
post #5818 of 7342
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

How long can eggnog be stored? I still have a bottle from a local producer that for whatever reason (it's Germany after all) does not have an expiry date printed on it. Likewise, a bottle from a very big producer (Verpoorten) doesn't have one either. It just states that the opened bottle should be consumed in 6 months while kept in the fridge. I can therefore assume that 1.5 years doesn't matter as long as the bottle is closed, right?

Does eggnog in Germany get sold with alcohol already in it? I've never seen that in America, but eggnog here is also terrible, so I just make it myself. It apparently can be aged for at least a year if there's enough alcohol in it, but I've never tried that.
post #5819 of 7342
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post

Does eggnog in Germany get sold with alcohol already in it? I've never seen that in America, but eggnog here is also terrible, so I just make it myself. It apparently can be aged for at least a year if there's enough alcohol in it, but I've never tried that.
Yup, 40 proof. Doesn't taste too bad actually. But never had homemade eggnog so I may try it this year.
post #5820 of 7342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

I bought another cooling rack and cookie sheet to cook chicken in the oven with today. If i put two sheets in the oven how should I space them out in the oven? One rack on top of the other, or should I put one closer to the top and one closer to the bottom?
As to temp, should I increase it slightly (say from 375 to 400) to make up for the extra chicken, or leave it at the same temp but just give it longer to cook?

its almost time for more chicken. can anyone help me out with this one please?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Random Food Questions Thread