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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 387

post #5791 of 7372
What the hell.
post #5792 of 7372
Yeah, kakis need to be completely ripe (very very soft). Sharons on the other hand are perfectly edible when they're still hard. They can look very similar and are often labeled wrongly...
post #5793 of 7372
Well, I did not know any of this. The one I am looking at has a sticker that does say fuyu on it.
post #5794 of 7372
Quote:
Fuyu
These persimmons are nonastringent, so they can be eaten while still firm. When ripe, they have a red-orange skin and flesh. They are smaller than hachiya persimmons and are more tomato-shaped.

Give it a try, I guesss. You could also try to make a small hole and slightly stick a cake tester in, then taste the juice that sticks to the cake tester. If it tastes ok you should be good to go in case the persimmon is still firm. If it's astringent, leave it.
post #5795 of 7372
i have a fuyu tree in my front yard and that makes me an expert. seriously, there is still a bit of astringency in them, particularly when they are underripe (of course, it's hard to tell ripe from underrripe since they don't soften until the very end).
post #5796 of 7372
This talk of persimmons reminds me of taking a fuyu as a snack to school and getting razzed for eating a "little pumpkin." Also remember quite vividly the terrible mouth-drying astringency y'all are talking about. Ahh, the joys of growing up Korean.
post #5797 of 7372
It doesn't affect me as much when I eat them without the peel. Perhaps the peel is the problem.
post #5798 of 7372
Tannins are usually more highly concentrated in peels, so that would make sense.
post #5799 of 7372
Have a persimmon (kaki) tree in the back yard, don't know what variety, but they should be called Yummy variety. Only seems to fruit every second year. I've never seen anyone in Japan eat the skins.
post #5800 of 7372
I pickled some. They are nice pickled.
post #5801 of 7372
Anyone give this a go? I want to try making Peking duck at home and wonder how this easier method really compares.

http://mobile.seriouseats.com/2010/09/the-food-lab-how-to-make-peking-duck-at-home.html
post #5802 of 7372
Are any of the meat grinder/sausage stuffing attachments for KitchenAid mixers worth buying? The KitchenAid brand ones seem kind of cheap and mostly plastic and the nicer metal ones are pretty expensive. Does anyone have any experience with them or have other recommendations?
post #5803 of 7372
post #5804 of 7372
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacox View Post

Are any of the meat grinder/sausage stuffing attachments for KitchenAid mixers worth buying? The KitchenAid brand ones seem kind of cheap and mostly plastic and the nicer metal ones are pretty expensive. Does anyone have any experience with them or have other recommendations?

How much do you plan to grind? A decent hand crank model (unfortunately it sounds like quality control has gone to shit in recent years) will be solid metal, have a good set of interchangeable plates, easily go in the freezer and stay cold, and unless you are doing a ton of meat all the time...its not that much work to hand crank.
post #5805 of 7372
I probably won't be using it too often, so there's probably no need for a big commercial grade setup. For around $50 I can get the plastic KitchenAid attachment versus the all metal ones which seem to be around $140-170. At that price I could get a higher quality dedicated grinder/stuffer but don't know if it's even worth the money/space for the few times a year I might use it.
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