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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 382

post #5716 of 7190
I have no idea how I have not died. I'll have some garlic oil sitting on my countertop for 7-10 days and I just top it up with oil and reuse it whenever I need to.
post #5717 of 7190
I guess, like fg said, chances are rather low. But if you do want to make it, I think it would be wise to store it in the fridge to further limit the risk (of proteolytic types).
post #5718 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

I guess, like fg said, chances are rather low. But if you do want to make it, I think it would be wise to store it in the fridge to further limit the risk (of proteolytic types).

You limit the risk of both, you just don't destroy the risk of one. And it is a tiny, tiny risk.
post #5719 of 7190
Yeah. wink.gif
post #5720 of 7190
tiny, but serious. still, i tend to be extremely cautious about these things in theory, if not in practice, because i'm usually writing for a very general audience. and it's dwindling already without me killing any of them off.
post #5721 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

I have no idea how I have not died. I'll have some garlic oil sitting on my countertop for 7-10 days and I just top it up with oil and reuse it whenever I need to.

Hell... I know at least two restaurants that are guilty of this tableside.
post #5722 of 7190
Well, if the risk of botulism is 1 in 10,000 at room temp (using your numbers) which is prime temp for the toxins to grow, it is probably in the one in a billion range held at 40 F. I just couldn't bring myself to worry about that.
post #5723 of 7190
all true, but really, how hard is it to make garlic oil fresh? it's not like it's something that is going to improve by sitting. just a convenience.
post #5724 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by FDA 
Germination, growth, and toxin formation by Clostridium botulinum type A, and proteolytic B and F
50-70°F (10-21°C) 11 hours
Above 70°F (above 21°C) 2 hours

Germination, growth, and toxin formation by Clostridium botulinum type E, and nonproteolytic B and F
37.9-41°F (3.3-5°C) 7 days
42-50°F (6-10 °C) >2 days
51-70°F (11-21°C) 11 hours
Above 70°F (above 21°C) 6 hours
post #5725 of 7190
you win b1os. you are now king of all food knowledge.
post #5726 of 7190
plain.gif

FWIW, I was just curious and thought some might be interested as well. Obviously, the risk of botulism is quite minimal. Eating raw oysters is much more dangerous (norovirus), for example.
Edited by b1os - 11/5/12 at 2:56pm
post #5727 of 7190
So olive oil--ok to store at room temp for a very long time
garlic--ok to store at room temp for weeks

put garlic in olive oil--throw away immediately?

Obviously the garlic has been peeled in this scenario (and crushed in some descriptions) but is that all it takes to go from A-OK to botulism?
post #5728 of 7190
in very, very rare, but potentially very very serious, situations. yes.
post #5729 of 7190
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

So olive oil--ok to store at room temp for a very long time
garlic--ok to store at room temp for weeks
put garlic in olive oil--throw away immediately?
Obviously the garlic has been peeled in this scenario (and crushed in some descriptions) but is that all it takes to go from A-OK to botulism?

The anaerobic part seems to be the important distinction.
post #5730 of 7190
Could someone tell me if the string cheese I left on my counter this morning is still safe to eat?
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