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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 381

post #5701 of 7356
What will you be using this for?
post #5702 of 7356
Botulism spores are killed at a certain temperature for a certain amount of time, but I don't remember what those numbers are. Dunking a few garlic cloves in oil won't get you much garlic flavor anyway. Best is to crush the hell out of them and put the oil in the fridge. It will cloud a little, and take a little longer, but as long as you don't care about those things, it works well. Otherwise, you can simmer crushed garlic in oil. That will kill the botulism but the taste will be of cooked garlic.

Basically, botulism is anaerobic and lives in soil, so garlic, which is grown underground, and oil, which is oxygen free, is not a great mix.
post #5703 of 7356
Speaking of garlic cooked in oil, I attempted a garlic confit last week and completely botched it. As with a handful of Passard recipes, I find that my smallest burner, even at its' lowest setting, is too hot. I'm guessing I need some type of heat diffuser?
post #5704 of 7356
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

I'd reheat in the oven, putting the food on a rack above a cookie sheet and being careful not to try to do too many at a time. leave some room in between.

Thank you for the suggestion - will try it out next time around.
post #5705 of 7356
Quote:
Originally Posted by shibbel View Post

For anyone still interested in this, I just picked up a copy off of the Amazon UK site for a little under $90 shipped.

Williams Sonoma was carrying it for about a day. I bought it for $75 and have yet to make a thing from it. pretty though.
post #5706 of 7356
I would have never guessed WS would offer a value with something including Bras in the name. $1,500 knife block anyone?
post #5707 of 7356
Cook garlic confit covered in a low oven.
post #5708 of 7356
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Botulism spores are killed at a certain temperature for a certain amount of time, but I don't remember what those numbers are. Dunking a few garlic cloves in oil won't get you much garlic flavor anyway. Best is to crush the hell out of them and put the oil in the fridge. It will cloud a little, and take a little longer, but as long as you don't care about those things, it works well. Otherwise, you can simmer crushed garlic in oil. That will kill the botulism but the taste will be of cooked garlic.
Basically, botulism is anaerobic and lives in soil, so garlic, which is grown underground, and oil, which is oxygen free, is not a great mix.

wow, I've been doing this forever. I use some oil in a little bowl, crush some garlic, throw some fresh herbs in there and use it for that meal. I saran wrap whatever is left and a week later, throw some more oil in there and pour it on something else or use it on bread. I guess I won't be doing that anymore uhoh.gif
post #5709 of 7356
If you keep it in the fridge you are fine.
post #5710 of 7356
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

If you keep it in the fridge you are fine.
Do you have a precise number for that? Wikipedia says:
Quote:
Proper refrigeration at temperatures below 3°C (38°F) retards the growth of Clostridium botulinum.
Most fridges are (well) above 38°F. I'm not sure how much that influences the growth rate which is why I ask.
post #5711 of 7356
So my beer collection apparently got mildly hurricaned. I don't think water got all the way up the bottles maybe halfway, but is it safe to drink? I think we're not supposed to, but is it possible for bacteria or whatever to actually get in the bottle, even if they were fully submerged? Some are regular caps and some are champagne corks if that makes a difference.
post #5712 of 7356
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Do you have a precise number for that? Wikipedia says:
Most fridges are (well) above 38°F. I'm not sure how much that influences the growth rate which is why I ask.

I am sure that number is right. My fridge is a bit colder than 38. I would not worry at normal fridge temp anyway, while it may grow there under otherwise perfect conditions, it is way, way suboptimal as far as temperatures go.
post #5713 of 7356
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I am sure that number is right. My fridge is a bit colder than 38. I would not worry at normal fridge temp anyway, while it may grow there under otherwise perfect conditions, it is way, way suboptimal as far as temperatures go.
Then again it's botulinum toxin.. rather safe than sorry, imo.
post #5714 of 7356
this is one of those calls that depend on your comfort zone. I've done this many times, usually for a day or two. I would hesitate to do it longer, though. the issue is botulism. you may have only a 1-in-10,000 chance of encountering it, but if you do, you're in for WAY more than a tummy ache.
post #5715 of 7356
Quote:
A second important factor affecting the growth and toxin production is temperature. Proteolytic [A, B, F strains] types grow between 55 and 122 degrees F, with most rapid growth occurring at 95 degrees F. Nonproteolytic [B, E, F strains] types grow between 38 and 113 degrees F, with an optimum for growth and toxin production at about 86 degrees F. For these types, refrigeration above 38 degrees F may not be a complete safeguard against botulism.
(P. Kendall, Colorado State University)
The non-proteolytic types have a very low heat resistance. However, it takes 10 minutes of boiling (+ 1 minute per 1000 ft above sea level) to "deactivate" type A (or the other non-proteloytic B and F strains).
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