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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 378

post #5656 of 7386
A friend of of my fiancees was visiting recently and had a nasty stomach ache and was being awfully dramatic about it. My lady told her to take a swig of vinegar, but the friend wasn't really listening and thought she was being given a bottle of water. She took an enormous gulp and then vomited violently.
post #5657 of 7386
Why do I want to avoid moving the bones?
The recipes I looked at claimed you can reuse the bones two or three times, but I plan to get rid of them.

I skimmed some of the scum off as it was simmering, but it seems hard to get the fat off that way.
post #5658 of 7386
Resusing the bones yields something called "remoulage", basically, really weak stock. I wouldn't bother. It's useful if you are economizing in the extreme but I have never found much use for it.
post #5659 of 7386
Once a stock is off the heat, the impurities remaining will settle at the bottom of the pot. You want to avoid moving the bones around at this point to prevent these particles from rising back into the liquid and clouding your stock. That is why it is best to ladle out the stock, as opposed to pouring all the contents through a strainer at once. This is more of an issue with clear stocks, like chicken or white veal. With a brown stock, like the one you are making, it's probably not of any great concern.
post #5660 of 7386
Bunch of copies of Simply French on amazon for less than a buck (plus the $3.99 hardcover shipping) in "good" condition.

Picked one up.
post #5661 of 7386
I haven't made that much from Simply French. The pictured recipes are cool but half of them use copious amounts of truffles, or so it seems. It gets intimidating not for skill level but because my wallet screams.
post #5662 of 7386
Just finished straining the stock through a chinois and cheescloth. Now what? My wife wants nothing to do with it and I don't cook much. Water the plants?
post #5663 of 7386
Your wife doesn't eat beef stew?
post #5664 of 7386
I am somewhat confused as to why you are making beef stock in the first place if you have no use for it.
post #5665 of 7386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Your wife doesn't eat beef stew?
She's vegetarian. Between celiac and dairy allergies, my kids are pure carnivores, so she cooks meat, but she won't eat it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I am somewhat confused as to why you are making beef stock in the first place if you have no use for it.
A combination having read an article about the benefits for the joints of having cartilage in the diet the same week I played squash every day, a hurricane and poor impulse control.

I am making a variant of onion soup, but it will basically be carmelized onions in beef stock with some other stuff, but no cheese. We do have some stale oat bread, so I will see if I want to use it.
post #5666 of 7386
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

She's vegetarian. Between celiac and dairy allergies, my kids are pure carnivores, so she cooks meat, but she won't eat it.
.

Way to fight those stereotypes, dopey
post #5667 of 7386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Way to fight those stereotypes, dopey
How do you mean?
post #5668 of 7386
Your kids are celiac and lactose intolerant? interesting
post #5669 of 7386
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

How do you mean?

I wasn't super aware of it either, but one year I was up in Marin County for Thanksgiving, and in order to see two close friends I had dinner with some Christians in Stinson Beach and dessert with some fellow Jews in Mill Valley.
The Christian dinner was like a post harvest/hunt still life, orange and brown colored pumpkins, yams, and birds everywhere. Everyone worked with their hands and was in robust health. Then went to dessert where everyone was a lawyer, banker, or doctor, and all the service and food was black and white, very Modern, and arranged by allergy.
post #5670 of 7386
not lactose intolerant. One has a dairy allergy (I don't know what the allergan is), but they are both intolerant of the protein in dairy, which is related to gluten (the protein in grains). The dairy intolerance isn't as violent as the ceilac, but given the younger daughter's severe allergy, dairy is anathema in our house whereas gluten is just something they can't eat and not a cause for a freak-out.
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