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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 360

post #5386 of 7218
I know sauce au poivre with poivre dans la sauce. Makes sense regarding the name, but maybe you're right.
post #5387 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

I know sauce au poivre with poivre dans la sauce. Makes sense regarding the name, but maybe you're right.

I'm not sure sauce au poivre even exists. I was describing the method for steak au poivre, which is what I assumed he meant because real poivrade sauce is so rare these days, and doubly so in a country where wild game is almost never sold.
post #5388 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Pun View Post

How to tell when my golden sweet pineapple is at peak ripeness?

pull on the 'leaves' at the top - if they release pretty easily, the pineapple is ripe.
post #5389 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

pull on the 'leaves' at the top - if they release pretty easily, the pineapple is ripe.

If leaves pull out easily you've probably got an over ripe or rotten pineapple. You should look for a yellowy colour from the base to at least half way up preferably higher. Smell the base of the pineapple it should smell sweet like pineapple juice. It should still be firm/slightly soft to the touch, if it's spongy it is over ripe, if it has little smell and is firm it isn't ripe. Don't buy a completely green pineapple.
post #5390 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Are you looking to make sauce poivrade or sauce au poivre. They sound the same, but the first is a very complicated sauce for game meats and the second is simple for steak. For the latter, which is what you probably want, you take the pan in which you made the well peppered steak, you deglaze it with cognac, flame, then add reduced veal stock and cream and cook until it thickens, then pour over your meat. For the former, well, you kind of have to do it the long way, and not dog bones, those are generally smoked.

If you pepper the steak before putting it in the pan don't you find that the pepper burns? Especially in a pan hot enough to get a good maillard reaction on the steak. I usually add pepper to the pan before deglazing.
post #5391 of 7218
IMO it doesn't really burn (unless you burn the steak, too). Maillard takes place at >250°F. Actually, the taste of pepper changes when you heat it. None is better, but you may very well prefer the non-"grilled" pepper.
post #5392 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

IMO it doesn't really burn (unless you burn the steak, too). Maillard takes place at >250°F. Actually, the taste of pepper changes when you heat it. None is better, but you may very well prefer the non-"grilled" pepper.

Yep I know pepper changes as you heat it, I cook it a little before deglazing and also often add fresh pepper just before deglazing as well.
post #5393 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

If you pepper the steak before putting it in the pan don't you find that the pepper burns? Especially in a pan hot enough to get a good maillard reaction on the steak. I usually add pepper to the pan before deglazing.

I agree with you for the most part. Still, just because I think something doesn't mean it is the right answer to a question.
post #5394 of 7218
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Are you looking to make sauce poivrade or sauce au poivre. They sound the same, but the first is a very complicated sauce for game meats and the second is simple for steak. For the latter, which is what you probably want, you take the pan in which you made the well peppered steak, you deglaze it with cognac, flame, then add reduced veal stock and cream and cook until it thickens, then pour over your meat. For the former, well, you kind of have to do it the long way, and not dog bones, those are generally smoked.

That makes sense. Thanks a bunch.
post #5395 of 7218
Are fresh porcini from Poland any good?
post #5396 of 7218
it reallly depends on the quality (not a circular answer). central europe is really REALLY rich in great wild mushrooms and has a long tradition of mushroom cookery (including and maybe especially boletes). but a great mushroom harvested in poland, shipped carelessly and stored too long will not be a good mushroom. you know what to look for -- firm, not slimy, stems should be firm, too. whether you want the caps tightly closed or not depends on how you're going to use them ... tightly closed is best for raw; open is a little sloppier but richer flavored ... best for cooking (trim the gills).
post #5397 of 7218
That makes sense. I can buy them directly from the importers, but I am wondering if Polish ones are considered inferior to others.
post #5398 of 7218
Mitteleuropean chanterelles are great.
post #5399 of 7218
you know, before being devastated by wwi, wwii and the iron curtain, mitteleuropa was regarded as a culinary paradise, the equal of france and probably ahead of italy. sometime pick up joseph wechsberg's great book "blue trout and black truffles" and you'll get a real sense of what was lost .
post #5400 of 7218
Is the recipe for the Robuchon quail with foie gras in any book? I have felt like making that for some time and seen a few of you dudes making it but couldn't find the recipe in any books. Le Grand Livre is like $500 so I just go browse it at the store. redface.gif
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