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Random Food Questions Thread - Page 355

post #5311 of 7152
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Whenever I've kept them in the fridge, they will keep nicely, but I've noticed it affects the taste. Storing them at room temp, in the direction in which they were picked, seems the best way to go.

Maybe in an egg carton, inside of a paper bag?
post #5312 of 7152
Why would you need the paper bag if you keep them inside an egg carton? It's a nice idea, but not highly logical.
post #5313 of 7152
because I'm assuming that you'll cut the top off of the carton so that they don,t get smushed by the lid and will need a way to keep the light out.
post #5314 of 7152
what about putting the paper bag inside an ostrich egg carton?
post #5315 of 7152
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

because I'm assuming that you'll cut the top off of the carton so that they don,t get smushed by the lid and will need a way to keep the light out.

Well, they are not quite that big. But thanks anyway.
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

what about putting the paper bag inside an ostrich egg carton?

This is a great idea. Thanks.
post #5316 of 7152
they should be stored in the same position that they swim.
post #5317 of 7152
this is an issue i've been confronting lately as my fig tree has finally started producing ... and because i've been buying a ton of them at the farmers market anyway (fig tree is adolescent and is not yet up to fulltime work). i've got a plastic storage box for them ... i pile them in in as close to a single layer as i can and then put the lid on tight. you do want to keep figs cold ... they go bad really quickly (and i haven't found that it hurts the flavor, once they warm back up). they are also really fragile so putting them in a bag (plastic or anything else) you can end up with jam. you don't want to put them in a paper bag because you want to cut down on air circulation to keep them from drying out.
i spend way too much time thinking about such things.
post #5318 of 7152
One of the advantages of having your own tree is picking them at their peak. I've noticed at farmer's markets they tend to pick them while they are still quite firm, and less than ripe, so that they don't spoil in transit/longer shelf life. This is the same with baby vegetables. Many farms won't pick them very young because they will spoil faster. That is why you see pattypan squash the size of your head around here.
post #5319 of 7152
there's an old proverb for picking figs, which i believe is spanish but my spanish expert says she's never heard of ... anyway, something like they should have beggar's robes and a widow's eye. the best, sweetest, ripest figs will have dull skins that may even be raggedy. and the little "eye" at the bottom may weep a bit with syrup.

panachee figs from my adolescent slacker tree (note, this represents about 2/3 of my total harvest).
post #5320 of 7152
Those look beautiful.

There is a picture in an Alain Ducasse book of him holding figs like you've described.



A nice looking recipe I'd like to try, as well: fig tartines with sheep's curd and honey. Just need to find some sheep's curd.
post #5321 of 7152
when you've got great figs, out-of-hand is a great way to enjoy them (with rose!). if you want a little more, whip up some ricotta with a dab of cream and some honey and fill them with that. i also make a kind of blow-out tart, line the shell with a layer of raspberry jam, stuff in quartered figs, sprinkle with lavender sugar. i do another one that's really simple with frangipane. they're not up to what you and matty pull off, but they're kind of rustic-pretty and really taste good.
post #5322 of 7152
Just throw some lavendula flowers in sugar? Any directions as to what ratios?
post #5323 of 7152
found this.
also, couldn't find a link to the tart recipe (that's how old it is), but here it is from my databse:
Lavender Fig Tart

Active Work Time: 20 minutes * Total Preparation Time: 1 hour 40 minutes

PASTRY SHELL

1 1/4 cups flour plus extra flour for rolling

1 tablespoon sugar

Pinch salt

1/2 cup butter plus extra for greasing

2 to 3 tablespoons water

* Combine flour, sugar, salt and butter in food processor or mixing bowl and cut together until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time, stirring constantly, until mixture just begins to come together. Remove from bowl and knead lightly and briefly to make smooth mass. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate 30 minutes.

* When chilled, remove plastic wrap and place dough on well-floured work surface. Roll out into circle roughly 11 inches in diameter. Fold in quarters and transfer to buttered 9-inch tart pan with removable bottom. Unfold and gently press into pan. Trim rim 1 inch from pan edge and fold extra dough between pan and dough rim to make taller edge. Refrigerate 30 minutes.

* Bake at 425 degrees until firm and rim begins to brown, about 10 minutes.

FIG FILLING

1 pound fresh figs

1 (8-ounce) jar raspberry jam

1 tablespoon water

Juice of 1/2 lemon

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon minced lavender leaves

Barely sweetened whipped cream

* Trim stems from figs and cut crosses in tops, coming down nearly to bottom, so fig will open like a flower. Heat jam, water and lemon juice over medium-high heat until smooth and flowing. Cook until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Pour mixture through strainer into baked tart crust. Spread evenly across bottom.

* Arrange figs in tart, pressing them open first and then arranging to cover as much of bottom as possible. Combine sugar and lavender in small bowl and stir to combine. Strain out chunks of lavender and sprinkle flavored sugar over top of figs. Bake at 425 degrees until figs soften, about 10 minutes. Cool slightly and serve with whipped cream.
post #5324 of 7152
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

when you've got great figs, out-of-hand is a great way to enjoy them (with rose!). if you want a little more, whip up some ricotta with a dab of cream and some honey and fill them with that. i also make a kind of blow-out tart, line the shell with a layer of raspberry jam, stuff in quartered figs, sprinkle with lavender sugar. i do another one that's really simple with frangipane. they're not up to what you and matty pull off, but they're kind of rustic-pretty and really taste good.

tounge.gif

I made dessert the other night. Strawberries, crumble, whipped cream and strawberry mint granita. I think you would have approved.
post #5325 of 7152
Where are the pics?
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