or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › First business trip to London
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First business trip to London - Page 3

post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by boo
I'll probably get some cash to tide me over until I reach my hotel, and use the ATM from there. Will definitely keep in mind re: walking across the street. I have a good health plan, but I'd rather not put it to the test. I've verified my cell phone will work on European bands, but for $.99/minute plus international long distance charges if I call a UK number. I'll look into pre-paid sim cards, and I'm pretty sure my phone is unlocked.

Any info on suggested bars or restaurants would be appreciated. I've always wanted to do the pub with fish & chips routine. I'm staying at the St. Martin's Lane hotel to give perspective on what part of London I'll be in.


St. Martin's Lane is a nice hotel, on the other hand it always eludes me as to why they named a hotel after such an insignificant street (well in relative terms, after all the street is famous for the former premises of Thomas Chippendale), I'd be as eluded to a hotel named Oxford Street, or Bond Street...
The area is relatively nice, Covent Garden, which is near has some nice things, and you're close to the Stand area, which is the original London, and to this day retains some of that feel.

I'll second the recommendation to eat in Chinatown, though it is indeed much better for a quick seafood or dim sum lunch than a leisurely dinner.

You're within a leisurely stroll to Soho (entertainment district), Mayfair (exclusive shopping), Marylebone (luxury, but not to Mayfair's level, shopping), Bloomsbury (museums, libraries), and the Inns of Court (Lawyers, and Law Schools).

Knightsbridge (Shopping, similar to Mayfair), Brompton(Home Furnishings, Restaurants, Antiques), Belgravia(Mostly residential, a few good shops, such as Cigars, Wine, and some good restaurants and bars, for example, IMO Hunan is the best Chinese in London), The City (business district), Bayswater (Diverse residential area, some good more authentic Chinese restaurants), Notting Hill (atmospheric area, antique shops, London based designer clothes, good restaurants and bars), Chelsea (Similar to Notting Hill, but more exclusive), South Kensington (Museums, gastro pubs, and wealthy international students(of course in students terms)!) Kensington (proper) (High Street Shopping, cafes), Westminster (Civil centre, and most British businesses are here rather than the city), St. James’s (Cigars, wine, gentlemen’s clubs, Tailoring) and Pimlico (perhaps some of the most quirky pubs and fish and chip shops in London, plus most of the politicians live here) are all also nearby.

As for restaurants you must go, if you can get reservations, to Gordon Ramsay at Royal Hospital Road, (Chelsea) if not, Maze (Mayfair) or The Boxwood Cafe in the Berkeley Hotel (Belgravia), even if they are over-rated, they are still worth going to.

As you I coming from America, I don't think Nobu is going to appeal to you, but the new one, Nobu Berkeley in Berkeley Square in Mayfair is much better than the original in the Metropolitan Hotel.

The Blue Bar, in the Berkeley Hotel (Belgravia) is excellent, as is Claridge's Bar (in the Claridge's Hotel on Brook Street in Mayfair) and Fifty (50 St. James's Street), though this is member's only.
post #32 of 36
Regarding traffic, note that there's no right of way for pedestrians. One of my friends, on the first day of his semester abroad, got hit by a bus and broke his leg because of this. Not a good way to begin an overseas trip.
post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
Regarding traffic, note that there's no right of way for pedestrians. One of my friends, on the first day of his semester abroad, got hit by a bus and broke his leg because of this. Not a good way to begin an overseas trip.

At pellican and zebra crossings; there is.
post #34 of 36
Only when the pedestrian light is lit green. In America (and some other countries), when there is a green taffic light, pedestrians can still safely cross the street where cars turn right (which would be left in the UK). Even when the pedestrian light, if there, is red. I'm not sure the latter is legal, but drivers are very aware that they have to slow down when making a right.
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
but drivers are very aware that they have to slow down when making a right.

Hmm, ever been to Philly?
post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
Only when the pedestrian light is lit green. In America (and some other countries), when there is a green taffic light, pedestrians can still safely cross the street where cars turn right (which would be left in the UK). Even when the pedestrian light, if there, is red. I'm not sure the latter is legal, but drivers are very aware that they have to slow down when making a right.

Yes, this is true. I find the American driving rules quite arkward. I've driven in US cities many times; but when I was in Toronto last, I learnt at some box junctions (not sure what the real name for them is, but I mean the place where roads meet from all four sides, and the person who reaches first goes first) you actually have to stop, and to simply slow down and check is not enough, I cannot see the logic in this, I don't know if this is exclusive to Canada, or such a rule exists in the US too.
In the UK in concept such a rule exists at junctions, which is signifed by a stop sign as opposed to a give way sign, but I have never actually seen one.
Another thing which confuses me in American countries, is who's right of way it is on roundabouts, in the UK you always, and I mean always, whether on or off a roundabout, give way to cars on your right.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › First business trip to London