or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Poll: Attolini vs. Rubinacci vs. Steed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Poll: Attolini vs. Rubinacci vs. Steed - Page 8

post #106 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Herbert View Post
i wouldnt be so hard on yourself. all the suits and jackets range from great to excellent in my very humble opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maomao1980 View Post
Originally Posted by Montesquieu:

In response to so much criticism of my trousers, I'll say a few words about them. First, most of the non-suit trousers shown are slim-fit Incotex and Cucinelli. If RTW gets slimmer than that, I don't know where. Second, I like the way that Incotex and Cucinelli look and fit. The vitriole surprises me, but so be it. Third, don't presume that bespoke is the solution. My Ambrosis are baggier, despite multiple rounds of "thinning", and have been well criticized as such in other threads.

As for the bespoke trousers shown, I agree that the Rubinacci suit, Attolini dinner, and Steed suit trousers have excess room. The Rubinacci was originally even baggier, before I made a final (fourth?) visit to the Milan store just to have them taken in. Why the struggle? I presume that it stems from an unusual physique. In two weeks, I'll run my third mountain ultramarathon of 2010 before switching back to cycling. My legs are short relative to my height and muscular relative to my thin waist.

Perhaps there's a well-tailored solution. Perhaps I'm doomed to look imperfect. Resignation to the latter reduces my expectation for the former. But the criticism is well taken, and I'll pay more attention in the future. I posted in order to get this kind of input.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maomao1980 View Post
I thank you for your genuine interest in receiving feedback. Reading the highlighted again, they are a bit troubling coming from a bespoke customer.

+1

it seems to me, you wanted too much in a rather short period of time. the learning curve is still flat. could it be, that your foray into bespoke started rather late, so you lack the basic knowledge?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post
Less dogma and more pleasure must be motto of SF...

this
post #107 of 301
1. Rubinacci
2. Attolini





3. Steed

Steed is a very distant third in my opinion. This isn't a matter of Naples vs Savile Row: your Steed coats just don't look as harmonious as the best English stuff one sees around. Those coats are waisted in an almost comical way, and the torso looks a bit boxy. I like Vox's Steed stuff much better -- it looks like it's from a different tailor.
post #108 of 301
Overall:

1. Attolini
2. Steed
3. Rubinacci

But with the odd exception. I would possibly have put your wild card as joint no. 1 though...
post #109 of 301
Montesquieu, did you ask for a particularly slim waist from these tailors? The jackets generally appear a bit tight to me.
post #110 of 301
Quote:
View Post
Less dogma and more pleasure must be motto of SF...

This is not the ideology Hans&Fritz would approve of.
post #111 of 301
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post
it seems to me, you wanted too much in a rather short period of time. the learning curve is still flat. could it be, that your foray into bespoke started rather late, so you lack the basic knowledge?

True, I started late and purchased beyond my learning curve. Some history. I moved from Silicon Valley to Ireland in 2006. Needing a new wardrobe, I tossed my ill-fitting California clothes and regretfully wasted some money on Italian RTW (e.g., Prada). In 2007, my role expanded, I relocated to Luxembourg, and I needed an even better wardrobe. That's when my interest in clothing began, but without education or role models. I progressed in a matter of months in 2007-2008 from better Italian RTW (Al Bazar, Borrelli, Incotex) to MTM (Attolini, Castangia) to bespoke. Most of the bespoke was purchased mid-2008 to mid-2009. Did I lack basic knowledge? Yes. Did I trust that results would be acceptable without it? Yes. Were they? The more knowledgable of you don't think so. Your comments have inspired me to start paying more attention to trouser fit. The 4 Ambrosis I have on order will be a start, but I'll have to consider whether I'll seek modifications to my existing suit trousers. They didn't bother me until this thread. Now they do, so your input had effect.

In sum, these outfits have flaws of an uneducated bespoke buyer. But since I like most of the MTM and bespoke that I purchased, I'm glad I took advantage of my time in Europe to purchase what I did, imperfections and all. (My RTW is mostly regretted.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Montesquieu, did you ask for a particularly slim waist from these tailors? The jackets generally appear a bit tight to me.

No. I relied on the tailors' judgment for fit.
post #112 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
No. I relied on the tailors' judgment for fit.

Now that is really interesting.
post #113 of 301
Monte,

One comment I would like to make is that the trouser fit may have been just right after a pressing by the tailor. Sometimes it takes a little wear to find out an article's short comings. Regardless I think most of them could be fixed with a few minor alterations. I would be tempted to make most of them longer, have the area under the waistband in the back tightened (this should get rid of the backs behind the thigh) and possibly have some of them tapered below the knee.
post #114 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
No. I relied on the tailors' judgment for fit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
Now that is really interesting.

It really is, considering teh recent Foo thread.

If one can't rely on the bespoke expertise of the Rubinaccis and Steed to account for the client's body shape, then LORD HELP US ALL.
post #115 of 301
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
Now that is really interesting.

Was this meant condescendingly? I was and am still learning, and I trusted that tailors' fit judgment over my own. Given my three days experience in bespoke relative to their decades, this seemed prudent to me.

I doubt that I'm the only bespoke client who doesn't micromanage fit, especially when working with tailors in another language.
post #116 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
True, I started late and purchased beyond my learning curve. Some history... ...when my interest in clothing began, it was without education or role models. I progressed in a matter of months in 2007-2008 from better Italian RTW (Al Bazar, Borrelli, Incotex) to MTM (Attolini, Castangia) to bespoke. Most of the bespoke was purchased mid-2008 to mid-2009. Did I lack basic knowledge? Yes. Did I trust that results would be acceptable without it? Yes. Were they? The more knowledgable of you don't think so. Your comments have inspired me to start paying more attention to trouser fit.

as binge said, most of the pieces have to be seen IRL. imo, acceptable is a too low classification for the existing status. also your endurance sport might be a factor for change of measurements, not?

the good things: you are inspired. nothing is lost in this game, i.e. if you read about vox's "reconstruction work". etc., etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
In sum, these outfits have flaws of an uneducated bespoke buyer. But since I like most of the MTM and bespoke that I purchased, I'm glad I took advantage of my time in Europe to purchase what I did, imperfections and all.

to me this is most important.
post #117 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
Was this meant condescendingly? I was and am still learning, and I trusted that tailors' fit judgment over my own. Given my three days experience in bespoke relative to their decades, this seemed prudent to me.

No, not at all. I had just assumed, when I saw your stuff, that you'd asked for a slim, modern fit. It's not limited to just one of the tailors, so I thought that was perhaps your preference. That it seems to be coincidental surprises me, but there's no insult wrapped up in that.
post #118 of 301
Monte, they just want to know who to blame.
post #119 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
Most of the bespoke was purchased mid-2008 to mid-2009. Did I lack basic knowledge? Yes. Did I trust that results would be acceptable without it? Yes. Were they? The more knowledgable of you don't think so. Your comments have inspired me to start paying more attention to trouser fit. The 4 Ambrosis I have on order will be a start, but I'll have to consider whether I'll seek modifications to my existing suit trousers. They didn't bother me until this thread. Now they do, so your input had effect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
I relied on the tailors' judgment for fit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post
If one can't rely on the bespoke expertise of the Rubinaccis and Steed to account for the client's body shape, then LORD HELP US ALL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post
I was and am still learning, and I trusted that tailors' fit judgment over my own. Given my three days experience in bespoke relative to their decades, this seemed prudent to me.
Well, nothing looks uncorrectable to me and I stand by my opinion that you don't need to be an expert to get good results from a good tailor. I knew as little as you did when I first started with Rubinacci. I don't think anybody has suggested a client just go limp and remain 100% utterly passive during the bespoke process. However, you don't have to tell the tailor exactly what to do, either--you just need to take more time to digest each garment before ordering the next, then raise concerns at subsequent fittings. There are many issues that will not be obvious or arise until you've actually worn a garment around for a while. The tailor relies on your input on those issues to evolve your pattern. Ideally, you would front load all the growing pains in your first order from each tailor so that subsequent orders are all made on a much-corrected pattern. So, while I can't speak for you, starting up with three different bespoke tailors over the course of a single year sounds like an awful lot to chew on for anyone. In that light, I'm tempted to say that the results are surprisingly good.
post #120 of 301
Attolini #5 and #7 are excellent.
As is Steed #5, far better than the other Steeds in my opinion, very 'Savile Row' with better button placement and a more shapely waist (quite snug, though). Did you do something different for that one or maybe it's just the cloth?

All are acceptable in my opinion, no need to beat yourself up. You have a low right shoulder, which I imagine would make most RTW look bad. Only Attolini bespoke and Steed dealt with the resulting asymmetry properly imho, though even there, mostly in the later iterations.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Poll: Attolini vs. Rubinacci vs. Steed