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When is a Suit’s Silhouette “Too Much”? - Page 3

post #31 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Firstly, I think they'd 'relax' the cut somewhat for an American customer.

Secondly, Huntsman/Anderson's American clients represent a very small proportion of suit wearing American men.

And a very small proportions of British suit wearing men....
post #32 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
And a very small proportions of British suit wearing men....
Very true. I think the reaction to a man wearing the H./RA silhouette would be different in the U.S than it would in England though.
post #33 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Very true.

I think the reaction to a man wearing the H./RA silhouette would be different in the U.S than it would in England though.

Do you really think so?

RSS told me a story of people recognizing in the street his suit as a Richard Anderson's creation.

It wasn't obviously in Compton but...
post #34 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post
Do you really think so? RSS told me a story of people recognizing in the street his suit as a Richard Anderson's creation. It wasn't obviously in Compton but...
Yes I do, however, I can't provided any proof, it's just the gut feeling I get from reading the fora in general. Re-read Manton's post in this thread.
post #35 of 258
not sure which one of you this is, but I saved the picture because of the silhouete

it's striking but it looks great at the same time - a perfect balance of 'shape + drape'

if only it had Neapolitan shoulders it would be perfect




p.s. I just received my second WW Chan suit and it looks a lot like this silhouette except it has Neapolitan shoulders and is a bit narrower at the pant cuff and sleeve cuff

when my fiancee saw me trying it on, she said there was no way she was letting me out of the house looking that good :-)
post #36 of 258
I think we're forgetting the notion that, to most men, a suit is a suit is a suit. Of course, most of us can distinguish from different silhouettes, but do you really think the average guy is going to be able to instantly distinguish the A&S and Huntsman silhouettes? It seems glaringly obvious to us, but most really wouldn't blink. In general though, I prefer a very defined silhouette, and that's why I love seeing pictures of H. Poole and Huntsman suits.
post #37 of 258
I think 99% of all Americans have one of two views: (1) a suit is a suit, or (2) suits vary between slim-fitting and boxy. I'd say twice as many take the first view as the second, but the important point is that exceedingly few Americans take notice of silhouette as we mean it here. Thus, I think many of you are overestimating the magnitude and precision of reactions to silhouettes that are more shapely. Somebody who thinks your nipped-waist, flared-skirt Savile Row suit looks effeminate will just as likely find a slim-fitting suit from Banana Republic to be effeminate--the differences in their silhouettes simply won't calculate. He sees 'slim-fitting', and that's it. Moreover, most will just see a suit.
post #38 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal_1 View Post
not sure which one of you this is, but I saved the picture because of the silhouete it's striking but it looks great at the same time - a perfect balance of 'shape + drape' if only it had Neapolitan shoulders it would be perfect
Personally I would have a less padded, built up shoulder, but the shape through the body is exactly how my suits are cut.
post #39 of 258
Yes, I think a Huntsman/RA/Dege or any of the more strong-shouldered and waisted English cuts looks more striking here and will be noticed.

Americans are used to the sack, though it is quite rare these days. The most common by far is the minimally waisted 2 button. Then to the extent that Americans buy somthing more expensive and with more flair, it tends to be Italian. The iconic British cut is just very rare here and also pretty far from what we are used to.

Remember that A&S and Poole are the two most popular SR houses here (and even then they probably account for about .00001% of all American suits). For every SR suit I see in Manhattan, I see at least 100 expensive Italian RTW and 1,000 run of the mill department store American cuts.
post #40 of 258
NorCal - I was actually about to mention that people should run some searches for old posts of Whoopee as he always had the most striking silhouettes IMO. That one is a good example. As long as the silhouette matches one's body type than it should work well. I'm pretty thin and therefore prefer a shapely waist as it mimics my frame. How intense the silhouette is really comes down to personal preference and comfort as many here have stated. One thing that's often not discussed, but I consider equally as important as the waist silhouette is the back suppression. I prefer my suits/sportcoats to have a good amount of back suppression to follow the curve of my back. Let's be honest, half the people are viewing you from behind so why not give them something to look at as well. :^)
post #41 of 258
I'm very impressed by the intimate knowledge of British upper class mores possessed by posters in this thread. Where did you all acquire such in-depth info?
post #42 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
For every SR suit I see in Manhattan, I see at least 100 expensive Italian RTW and 1,000 run of the mill department store American cuts.

And that's Manhattan. Try visiting the midwest. Even 99% of suit-wearing Chicago is clothed in Jos. A. Bank--and very few men in Chicago wear suits.
post #43 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I think 99% of all Americans have one of two views: (1) a suit is a suit, or (2) suits vary between slim-fitting and boxy. I'd say twice as many take the first view as the second, but the important point is that exceedingly few Americans take notice of silhouette as we mean it here. Thus, I think many of you are overestimating the magnitude and precision of reactions to silhouettes that are more shapely. Somebody who thinks your nipped-waist, flared-skirt Savile Row suit looks effeminate will just as likely find a slim-fitting suit from Banana Republic to be effeminate--the differences in their silhouettes simply won't calculate. He sees 'slim-fitting', and that's it. Moreover, most will just see a suit.
Be careful. Don't confuse lack of articulation with ignorance. People notice more than you think.
post #44 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Be careful. Don't confuse lack of articulation with ignorance. People notice more than you think.

I agree that people take notice. The issue seems to be that they don't know what they're looking for in terms of what makes a quality product. People are to used to fashion magazines and trends shoving cliche images down their throats.
post #45 of 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Be careful. Don't confuse lack of articulation with ignorance. People notice more than you think.

I understand the risk of conflating the two. However, based on observation, both slim-fitting department store suits and very shapely bespoke suits tend to garner the same reactions from the same people. Do they notice something they are not conveying? Perhaps. But it doesn't appear to make a practical difference.
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