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Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution - Page 3

post #31 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam_Lee View Post
Yeah, but they could use tortillas for a crust...

wouldn't that be substituting a bread made without fat for a bread made with fat? just asking.
post #32 of 65
I must say, the diets of many on the show do seem pretty terrible. Loading up all of that food on the table and to see all of that fried golden brown was major ugh.

any opinions as to why stuff like this happens? People get too lazy to cook anything? Corporate food mills working to change the American family diet in order to cash out on profits? (ironically enough, the Hulu ads during the show were for Stoufer's frozen products)
post #33 of 65
Worst thing about the fat mom of fat kids was that she had to put in work to make fried shit by hand. Cooking healthy food would be easier for her, and it was still a chore.

I can only imagine what that house smells like if the deep fryer is her most-used appliance.
post #34 of 65
Thread Starter 
the stuff is too damn easy to eat. It's easier to spend a lot of time making shit food and then relaxing than spending a comparable amount of time making healthy food and being a parent and teaching your children about what's good to eat.
post #35 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by milosz View Post
FTFY
Yup The article failed to notice that in Britain we have state funded healthcare and the spending on school meals will lead to long term savings on the NHS (less obese kids, more healthy kids and grown ups..). Also it's been getting on for 70 years since any Nazi bombers have been spotted over our cities and rationing had nothing to do with Mr Oliver, can't blame that on him.
post #36 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
I must say, the diets of many on the show do seem pretty terrible. Loading up all of that food on the table and to see all of that fried golden brown was major ugh.

any opinions as to why stuff like this happens? People get too lazy to cook anything? Corporate food mills working to change the American family diet in order to cash out on profits? (ironically enough, the Hulu ads during the show were for Stoufer's frozen products)

Possibly the fact that many people don't know how to cook, so processed, ready-to-eat crap comprises the extent of their cooking abilities. The inability of my roommate to cook without packaged crap boggles my mind and actually pisses me off. I mean really, boil-in-bag rice?? Can you not boil some water and then simmer rice in it for 30 minutes?
post #37 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangfastic View Post
Yup The article failed to notice that in Britain we have state funded healthcare and the spending on school meals will lead to long term savings on the NHS (less obese kids, more healthy kids and grown ups..). Also it's been getting on for 70 years since any Nazi bombers have been spotted over our cities and rationing had nothing to do with Mr Oliver, can't blame that on him.


WTF is wrong with those idiots that write articles like that. Although I agree with a lot of libertarian ideas, condemning Jamie Oliver is just ridiculous. Yes the problem is the way funding for school lunches/food is beholden to big business. No argument there. It seems they just every family to brown bag lunches for their kids and cut funding altogether. It is precisely how some idiot parents feed their kids that school lunches are almost the last line of defense for a kid to get a good and nutritious meal. We are talking about the future of america.
post #38 of 65
I find the show fascinating in that infuriating slow-down-to-watch-the-car-accident kind of way. The parade of even-fatter-than-mes is shocking. I thought I was going to throw up when he showed the kids how chicken nuggets are made.
post #39 of 65
I happen to like Jamie Oliver; he has a bit of an ego, but his heart is in the right place.

I am no nutritionist, but I do happen to be an expert on international law as applied to food production and global importation restrictions as applied to genetically modified crops etc.

As is the case with all things, people react poorly to change and abhor the the command and control style of government. In short, even if something is better for someone. . . and they know it. . . they want to make the ultimate choice. Children are not capable of making choices with the same degree of consideration that adults are, they know what tastes good at the moment, even if they routinely get a stomach ache 15 minutes later it is of no concern, they will repeat the process the next day.

There are many healthy foods that can be made to appeal to children, hell, a simple PB&J on whole grain bread is a lot healthier than what many of these kids get. A bright colored salad should naturally be more appealing than a gray unrecognizable disc of meet claimed to be a hamburger, but the kids will pick the burger, often times for social reasons. Following WWII canned goods, microwaveable meals etc. became more popular as they made life easier and became cost-efficient. Preserving foods has historically been a good thing, salted meats, pickled vegetables, but only from the stand point that it enabled people to eat when certain foods were not readily available. Fresh is almost always best. At present factory farms churn out corn, low grade meat and, coupled with artificial flavorings and copious amounts of salt along with a heaping dose of government subsidies. . .feed our children crap. If these products cost what they should and quality standards were not at close to zero, children would be getting a much different school lunch. More importantly, the parents would not be feeding them, and thereby legitimizing, the same junk. Provided with options a child will eventually get it right. In short, people should have the option to eat healthy and be able choose to eat what they want, but they should bear the consequences for those decisions. Therefore we should be helping people make the right ones.
post #40 of 65
that's a pretty good assessment of us food policy in general. we've ended up with a very weird program where we actively subsidize the very foods we should be eating the least of (meat, sugar, dairy, foods for processing), while effectively penalizing the very foods we should be eating the most of (fresh fruits and vegetables). weird. slowly changing, but only incrementally.
post #41 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
I just don't really understand how a 12, 13 year old can weigh more than me.

My cousin has a kid who was wearing 32W pants at age 9 or 10. We have family get-togethers where he will ignore any real food served to him and run straight to the desserts. He'll take multiple slices of cake or pie, pick off and eat all of the frosting or whipped cream, then throw out the rest of it. My cousin laughs off any attempt to steer her and her kid in a better direction.

Sadly, his manners may be even worse than his diet. He's a poster child for "what the hell happened to this country."
post #42 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro View Post
My cousin has a kid who was wearing 32W pants at age 9 or 10. We have family get-togethers where he will ignore any real food served to him and run straight to the desserts. He'll take multiple slices of cake or pie, pick off and eat all of the frosting or whipped cream, then throw out the rest of it. My cousin laughs off any attempt to steer her and her kid in a better direction.

Sadly, his manners may be even worse than his diet. He's a poster child for "what the hell happened to this country."

I'm sorry for you during these family gatherings
post #43 of 65
Thread Starter 
french fries are a vegetable? hello america
post #44 of 65
his show seems a little too directed at entertainment for him to make such grandiose claims or goals like starting a "food revolution".


No offense, I am behind his cause 100%, it just seems that he is going into the situations with the schools with little/no planning beforehand. For example, it took him until his second or third meeting with the lunch ladies to realize that they would be important to have on his side. He also gets into arguments that really should just be discussions. He asks the lunch ladies if they would eat the food they serve. Instead, why not point out that the combination of oil and cooked starches in french fries make them unhealthy for EVERYONE. You can back that up with objective research. He could have taken a school lunch to the university (in the same town) and analyzed for exact nutrition content.

Instead he gets into an argument with the cooks AND the administration when his meals don't have enough veggies. And a couple weeks into the show, most of the lunch ladies still don't have an issue with the food they serve.

He has a kitchen set up downtown, but has yet to teach kids how to make simple recipes that they'll actually use. He taught that one fat kid how to stir-fry, but honestly, that wouldn't even be in my top-10 recipes to teach someone with weight issues. Teach them how to grill chicken. How to steam broccoli. How about including some food vendors? Why doesn't he work with the supermarkets to set up a booth there with samples and recipes of a simple healthy meal?

This is just entertainment. If the drama is real, it is the most poorly planned show I've ever seen.
post #45 of 65
Jamie Oliver is a good man. I genuinely believe he cares about people and what they eat. However the "revolution" he is spearheading is destined to fail because of government bureaucrats, and the parents of the children also being the product of the same "educational" system.
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