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Teaching English in Japan - Page 2

post #16 of 26
anything that would require you to teach and travel is an endeavour worth its weight in gold, imo. go for it, i say!
post #17 of 26
anything that forces Americans to realise the world doesnt fit in a neat box between Key West and Seattle is good for the whole world. Do it, itll change your life
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Brian SD: Did I understand your post correctly? Your school charges you $1400 to train you in exchange for allowing you to select where you will be placed?

Well, more or less. My school has some exchange set up where they send over teachers to companies in Japan that rely on SDSU for sending qualified individuals. The training program (which costs $1400) is basically a 5-day a week course where you are trained to teach your own English class (make your own lesson plans, your own games, etc. etc.). The end result is that you actually run your own class (as opposed to doing assistant work). For me, the major benefit is being able to choose what city to go to. I would pay $1400 for that.

I understand that Osaka and Tokyo are not the end all be all. There are lots of places I would love to live in inside of Japan and I may not be completely set on Osaka... so I'm interested to hear more about the different Japanese cities (I should probably just get a book). I wouldn't plan on making friends with Americans while there. I am learning Japanese right now (going on my 3rd year of studying), I plan to be fluent within the year (or more) that I live there, and I want to be completely dependent on myself and not live as a visitor, but a native.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Well, more or less. My school has some exchange set up where they send over teachers to companies in Japan that rely on SDSU for sending qualified individuals. The training program (which costs $1400) is basically a 5-day a week course where you are trained to teach your own English class (make your own lesson plans, your own games, etc. etc.). The end result is that you actually run your own class (as opposed to doing assistant work). For me, the major benefit is being able to choose what city to go to. I would pay $1400 for that.

I hope I didn't sound critical, and can understand wanting to trade a bit of money for some training and the opportunity to choose your own location.

Bic
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bic Pentameter
I hope I didn't sound critical, and can understand wanting to trade a bit of money for some training and the opportunity to choose your own location.

Bic

no, not at all. Was just clarifying a bit. I think others should seek out these opportunities as well as other options, because I too have heard that the competition at JET is getting rougher.
post #21 of 26
Alot of people I know who have independently taught in Japan have loved it and the people I know hated JET because they work you like a dog, but I guess Westerners that aren't used to the asian work ethic might be in for a shock, from what I hear, and yeah, you 99% probably won't get placed in a big city...

my feelings on Japan/Tokyo
I have such mixed feelings about Tokyo after going there for the 2nd time. The first time I went in 2003, I was in complete awe, it's such an amazing city, I said it was like NYC on crack. But when I came back in May, I had a quite a different feeling. At one time I feel like I had a great time, and got to enjoy a lot of what Tokyo has to offer, music, food, fashion, etc, but on the other hand when I was by myself, it's a really alienating city in my opinion. Like everyone is doing their business and in no way will you effect their lives.

At least that's my opinion about Tokyo, I'm sure it's a very biased opinion...but thats the lasting impression I got of it.
post #22 of 26
Nobody has posted this yet? http://www.gaijinsmash.net/
post #23 of 26
my friend dan wrote this a long time ago

http://pepper.idge.net/japanese/
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by poly800rock
Alot of people I know who have independently taught in Japan have loved it and the people I know hated JET because they work you like a dog, but I guess Westerners that aren't used to the asian work ethic might be in for a shock, from what I hear, and yeah, you 99% probably won't get placed in a big city...


I think it is difficult to generalize about JET, or about teaching English at a private school. I worked much harder and more hours at the family run English school and the businesss consulting company that sent me to corporate offices to teach business English (both profit making enterprises) than I ever did on JET (a public high school).

There may be some pressure on JET to stay in the office until the vice-principal leaves, but there probably isn't any pressure to bring in or retain students, and no pressure to stack lessons one atop the other for 8 hours straight with only a five minute break in between them.

On JET, I taught 11 hours in a Mon-Fri week. At the family run English school, I taught 28 hours in a Tues-Sat week.

Your mileage will vary....

Bic
post #25 of 26
Do any of you know if recieving a misdemeanor DUI when I was younger and less mature would exclude me from JET program? edit: ugh, terrible first post
post #26 of 26
I don't think that your past DUI would hurt you. I can't remember exactly, but I think that they would only ask about felony convictions.

On the other hand, if by "younger and less mature days" you mean six weeks ago or something... that could be a problem. But, if it were more than two years, I wouldn't worry about it. Everybody screws up from time to time and I don't think they'd hold that over your head.

John
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