Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › How expensive a stylist do I need for this haircut?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How expensive a stylist do I need for this haircut? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Thread Starter 
I'm not a huge fan of those pics. It seems better for someone a little older than me perhaps, given I am about to turn 22.
post #17 of 30
t'was mearly a suggestion. A thousand more out there. I happen to pick those out from a web site from France of current Mens hairstyles. Maybe you should google them like I did and save us from embarrasment of members curt remarks.

Best Regards,

Gary
post #18 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drink8648
t'was mearly a suggestion. A thousand more out there. I happen to pick those out from a web site from France of current Mens hairstyles. Maybe you should google them like I did and save us from embarrasment of members curt remarks.

Best Regards,

Gary

I tried googling and it seems that there are very few sites with practical, nice-looking hair cuts for young guys. That's why I ask here.
post #19 of 30
Both of the hairstyles you originally chose are perfectly acceptable.
The are both modern enough and can be worn more toned down if need be.
Get yourself a great hairstylist who knows how to cut with a razor and get some Bumble and bumble Sumotech for a matte look or Sumowax for some shine. If your not a Bumble fan go for some fudge hair products.
hair shaper, matte hed or fat hed depending on the finish you are looking for.
post #20 of 30
This type of hairstyle likely needs a wax, not gel.
post #21 of 30
To mitigate a little bit what I said earlier what's really important is to find a style that fits your face/coloration and this one tend to look better on men with darker hair and complexion, think latin, pakistani, south-east asian, etc.
post #22 of 30
I'm 20 and I've had a very similar hairstyle late last year. I had nothing but compliments and I've tried everything from bald, to faux-hawks, to 5 in. long hair (and still growing). It's actually gotten me the most consistent amount of compliments as far as I remember. But then again, I'm Filipino so if what Fuuma says holds true, I basically look latin AND south-east asian.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapay
I'm 20 and I've had a very similar hairstyle late last year. I had nothing but compliments and I've tried everything from bald, to faux-hawks, to 5 in. long hair (and still growing). It's actually gotten me the most consistent amount of compliments as far as I remember. But then again, I'm Filipino so if what Fuuma says holds true, I basically look latin AND south-east asian.

If you're Filipino your hair is probably quite thick (like most/all asians), another factor in making this aircut look best.
post #24 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma
If you're Filipino your hair is probably quite thick (like most/all asians), another factor in making this aircut look best.

My hair is very thick, although I am white. I have dark brown hair, which I think works with it.
post #25 of 30
My take - admittedly not a particularly helpful one - is that "what's a good haircut style" is pretty difficult to answer in the abstract. Obviously, where you are in life, and the environments you move in, provide some general guidelines. For example: My hair is thick and gets wavy/curly when I let it grow long. (I still recall one less than charitable but not completely off-base to Peter Brady when with his hair grown out a bit - for obvious reasons, I preferred the occasional George Harrison or Gabriel Byrne comparison to htat one. But I digress.) In my pre-professional life I often would wear it quite long. I liked how it looked and would get compliments from women. But in my current profession a much shorter, more "professional" hairstyle is appropriate, as I suspect it is in yours. But still, within those boundaries, what will "work" is going to depend on a lot of factors. First, there are what one might call "structural" issues. We all have different facial types, different head sizes/shapes, different hairlines, etc. A cut that looks good on one person may look terrible on someone else. Plus, varieties in hair color, texture, etc. are likely to play a factor, too. Second, it's important to have a hairstyle that matches your personality and sense of self. The last thing you want to do is look in the mirror every morning and think "I look like a dork." Third, a lot depends on the amount of time and energy you want to expend on "maintenance". That first pic you posted looks like you'd have to spend a fair amount of time "arranging" it with product, etc. Personally, I have enough demands on my time at this point in my life that any hairstyle that requires anything more than 30 seconds with a towel and brush or comb when I get out of the shower just isn't going to work for me. So that's something to consider, too.
Anyway, enough babbling. Bottom line, I'd suggest having some pictures of styles you're considering, but discussing them with the stylist/barber and solicting their advice as well. They're likely to have much more expertise in terms of what might or might not "work" for you.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroStyles
I am in Manhattan and looking for a great haircut. I'm willing to pay a lot (up to $75) but why pay if I don't have to? I'm not looking for a rocker or hipster look, since I work in consulting. The following is what I am going for:


So do I need an expensive stylist or will someone else do? Any recommendations in NYC? I want someone I can talk to and ask for opinions, not just someone who takes orders. Of course I want someone who is reliable, so no Supercuts. Thanks.

I don't have any recommendations in NYC but don't be afraid to ask people who have good haircuts (or whose hair looks good) where they get their hair cut.

Also, you don't need to pay an exhorbitant amount of $ for a good haircut. Stylists vary in price but not necessarily in skill. There is definitely a skilled hairstylist for a decent price in NYC. It might take some asking but you'll find one...
post #27 of 30
If you know what haircut you want (especially one of those you posted at the beginning) you can go to a quite cheap salon.

However, if you are not sure what cut you want, then a good stylist is worth the price. You can discuss your ideas and lifestyle with them, and they will work with your coloring, texture and the shape of your face to find a cut that works for you (and be much more knowledgeable than any of us!). They will also show you how to style it and recommend products (if they are good they will tell you what you can buy at the drugstore as well as what is on their shelves).

Splurge a little. IME it is worth it. You can always get the trim someplace cheaper.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
Also, you don't need to pay an exhorbitant amount of $ for a good haircut. Stylists vary in price but not necessarily in skill. There is definitely a skilled hairstylist for a decent price in NYC. It might take some asking but you'll find one...
Stylists most definitely vary in both skill and price. Should you manage to find an inexpensive and skilled one in NYC, please let the rest of us know. I used to use a moderately-priced, moderately-skilled stylist and have since decided that the higher-priced, higher-skilled stylist was worth the money. You wear your hair every day, like it or not.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
Stylists most definitely vary in both skill and price. Should you manage to find an inexpensive and skilled one in NYC, please let the rest of us know. I used to use a moderately-priced, moderately-skilled stylist and have since decided that the higher-priced, higher-skilled stylist was worth the money. You wear your hair every day, like it or not.

Maybe I wasn't clear in my original post. I meant that one can usually find a stylist that costs $100 and a stylist that costs $75 and they would be of equal skill. Just depends on the clientelle, area, type of salon, and so on.

I recently stopped getting a hair cut at a salon (that I worked at years ago) since they raised their prices. For $20 less, I went to someone else I know at a different salon with just as skilled hairstylists. The first salon was really trying to capture and market to the people in the area with $$$. Who can blame them? Nothing wrong with that I guess. I'm not one of the elite in this area so money is more important to me.
post #30 of 30
True, at a lot of places, you're paying for the fancy decor and marketing. Most good stylists would prefer to get paid more so they gravitate towards those places, too. Finding a good one without that overhead is hard, though.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Health & Body
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Health & Body › How expensive a stylist do I need for this haircut?