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Hollywood Casual, Down to Their Toes - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
I dislike flip flops on men for a couple of reasons. First, men's feet are ugly. More significantly, they're a manifestation of the middle-American obsession with leisure as the high point of life. So many people dress as though they were going to spend the day by the pool whenever they have the chance and regardless of whether or not they are in fact by a pool. I find the idea that dressing well is an imposition very Philistine and irritating.

I suppose I just don't relate to people whose idea of the sublime is sitting on a beach.
Well, some people enjoy spending time by the pool or beach, which might help explain how they develop an affinity for clothing associated therewith. If you don't enjoy either, you're probably right that you're never going to "get" flip-flops. Just out of curiosity, what would be your idea of the sublime? I derive great satisfaction from hard work well done and don't consider "dressing well" to be an imposition. I do, however, also value my leisure highly and believe that sitting quietly on a beautiful beach can be pretty darn sublime. I also enjoy kicking around town with my 5-year-old daughter, with both of us in our flip-flops. She likes my flip-flops and doesn't seem to regard my feet as ugly. I couldn't give a good goddam if anyone else does.
Personally, I think American culture (I don't pretend to know how to limn the middle class) in many ways would benefit from a greater focus on leisure and less emphasis on grinding materialism. But that's jmho, obviously.
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford
In honor of this thread, today I am wearing a tan linen 3-button suit, bright pink dress shirt (untucked) and leather flip-flops.

I have received numerous comments about my Miami Vice look today.

In honor of this thread, I wore flip-flops today, too....into the shower at the gym.

Since I don't even like looking at my feet, I won't subject others to looking at them.
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Well, some people enjoy spending time by the pool or beach, which might help explain how they develop an affinity for clothing associated therewith. If you don't enjoy either, you're probably right that you're never going to "get" flip-flops. Just out of curiosity, what would be your idea of the sublime? I derive great satisfaction from hard work well done and don't consider "dressing well" to be an imposition. I do, however, also value my leisure highly and believe that sitting quietly on a beautiful beach can be pretty darn sublime. I also enjoy kicking around town with my 5-year-old daughter, with both of us in our flip-flops. She likes my flip-flops and doesn't seem to regard my feet as ugly. I couldn't give a good goddam if anyone else does.
Personally, I think American culture (I don't pretend to know how to limn the middle class) in many ways would benefit from a greater focus on leisure and less emphasis on grinding materialism. But that's jmho, obviously.
I find the sublime in more subtle and fleeting moments. A view from a cafe window, the smell of an old library, a bird beside a mountain trail.

I would disagree with your appraisal of the American mindset. The obsession with retirement and disposable income suggests to me that Americans see life as a means to an end, that end being leisure time. I believe that one should do as many things as possible for their own sake.
post #19 of 36
The sublime is more of ineffable poignancy than a costly ski trip. In this leisure case, this is where the European mindset is superior to that of the American dynamic.
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
The sublime is more of ineffable poignancy than a costly ski trip.

In this leisure case, this is where the European mindset is superior to that of the American dynamic.
Yes, the laid-back European mind-set is wonderful:
http://www.funnyhub.com/pictures/img...soccer-fan.jpg

Not especially on point, but that picture always make me laugh (albeit somewhat ruefully).
post #21 of 36
The only thing I dislike more than flip-flops are the ugly feet of those that wear them.

It's one thing to wear them at the beach, but wearing them in the city is just gross.
post #22 of 36
I agree with GQgeek. I see people wering flip-flops in New York and I wonder if they realize what kind of germs on the street they're exposing their feet to.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
I find the sublime in more subtle and fleeting moments. A view from a cafe window, the smell of an old library, a bird beside a mountain trail.

I would disagree with your appraisal of the American mindset. The obsession with retirement and disposable income suggests to me that Americans see life as a means to an end, that end being leisure time. I believe that one should do as many things as possible for their own sake.

UMM. for 99% of the working population the only way you are going to get to those 3 places is during your leisure time. i would say you value that time highly, just dont realize it
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorially senseless
UMM. for 99% of the working population the only way you are going to get to those 3 places is during your leisure time. i would say you value that time highly, just dont realize it
Your and my definition of leisure would seem to vary. When I refer to leisure, I mean it in a fairly pejorative way, almost synonymous with indolence. The mindset that I'm talking about is that wherein education, work, and effort are all means to an end of doing as little as possible.
post #25 of 36
I like flip-flops (leather). The main reason is most of the casual shoes I really like are too narrow.
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
I dislike flip flops on men for a couple of reasons. First, men's feet are ugly. More significantly, they're a manifestation of the middle-American obsession with leisure as the high point of life. So many people dress as though they were going to spend the day by the pool whenever they have the chance and regardless of whether or not they are in fact by a pool. I find the idea that dressing well is an imposition very Philistine and irritating. I suppose I just don't relate to people whose idea of the sublime is sitting on a beach.
That's ironic, because the Italians, arguably the most stylish people on the planet, spend much more time in "leisurely" activities such as lounging on the shores of the Mediterranean, than the average middle-American, many of whom have never even seen the ocean.
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
The sublime is more of ineffable poignancy than a costly ski trip. In this leisure case, this is where the European mindset is superior to that of the American dynamic.
Funny how the Europeans are the ones who invented the practive of "apres ski....", while Americans are the ones who invented "extreme or X- sports." In ski-circles, the average European is usually known as the one usually spending luxury-money on drinks and apres ski in Chamonix. The American's are the ones known for blindly taking chances and getting killed by avalanches while snowboarding in the Utah backcountry. Which one is the more "sublime" experience now?
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
Your and my definition of leisure would seem to vary. When I refer to leisure, I mean it in a fairly pejorative way, almost synonymous with indolence. The mindset that I'm talking about is that wherein education, work, and effort are all means to an end of doing as little as possible.


Who is more indolent, the average American who works 40 hours a week, the average Frenchman who works 35, or the average Spaniard who works 30?
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
What is the appeal?

In hot Australian climates, they are most appealing. I had two pairs made, one in burgundy in a traditional flip flop fashion and the other a black banded slip on. Very comfy, and can be dressed up or down.
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
I dislike flip flops on men for a couple of reasons. First, men's feet are ugly. More significantly, they're a manifestation of the middle-American obsession with leisure as the high point of life. So many people dress as though they were going to spend the day by the pool whenever they have the chance and regardless of whether or not they are in fact by a pool. I find the idea that dressing well is an imposition very Philistine and irritating.

I suppose I just don't relate to people whose idea of the sublime is sitting on a beach.

Love it or hate it, Tommy Bahama has built a minor clothing empire based entirely on the idea of full time leisure ("Life is One Long Weekend", etc.). My hat's off to them. I wish I had thought of it.

As a PS, I love my flip flops. Think I'll buy another pair soon. I'd never wear them to work, but I have vacation coming up, and we're spending it at the beach.
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