or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Turning points, the bar exam, etc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Turning points, the bar exam, etc. - Page 4

post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Checks
Well, first, that's not my experience.

Second, and I think you'll agree, it's an entirely different stress level for the attorney. So, during a big trial, or on the eve of oral argument on a big motion or appeal, I might be out taking a jog, but my mind is going 100 mph, trying to figure every angle, every argument that will be made by an equally committed, educated, talented person who wants his client to win as much as I do.

I've been in trials where the other side is asking the jury for 175 million dollars, that will pucker your asshole for a month, becaue you know the jury is going to give that much if you lose.

The paralegal (I call them paranormals, because every one I've even known has been weird) doesn't have that level of stress. It's the difference between cleaning guns and being in the duel.
I agree with some of your observations. However, I think there's an entirely different kind of stress involved in being farther down the food chain, as paralegals generally are.
Also, I suppose in some sense you may be right that you can make more money as an excellent paralegal than as a truly crappy attorney (although I know plenty of crappy attorneys who make big bucks, too). But as a rule, I think that the market tops out for paralegals at a level that's below what most reasonably competent attorneys can earn. There are plenty of reasons for this, not least among them the investment law firms and lawyers have in reinforcing the professional "hierarchy".
post #47 of 56
Sorry, Javyn, I'm sure you will be the exception to my normal experience.

A really good paranorm- err, paralegal can be as well-informed as a so-so attorney. Within their range of duties (say, med-mal record review) they will know more than an attorney, but attorneys get paid for the breadth of their knowledge, their analysis, and their advice, which together deserve more pay than the in-depth but narrow expertise of a para; the difference between the technician and the professional.
post #48 of 56
Other jobs a lawyer can do...
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
Do tell...

Chicken-wing taster, golf course sand-trap evaluator, Goodyear-welt spotter, I could go on and on.
post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by aybojs
i.e. why take a lower-paying public defender job when one could make much more as a big name private defense attorney?)

Job satisfaction? Perhaps you should re-read "To Kill A Mockingbird" or "Simple Justice" and try to recall that there are reasons, other than making money, that lead people to become lawyers.

(If you need to know my LSAT and law school to judge the worth of my post, I'll be happy to PM them to you.)
post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Checks
Other jobs a lawyer can do...


Chicken-wing taster, golf course sand-trap evaluator, Goodyear-welt spotter, I could go on and on.
RJ cat wrangler... wait, that job's been made redundant... ... Style book collector, massive amounts of coffee drinker, yeah, the list goes on and on.
post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater
Trannys don't wear EG shoes!

Actually, according to Jeffrey Eugenides in Middlesex, they most certainly do:
"Since it was the weekend, I tried to dress down. It isn't easy for me. I wore a camel-hair turtleneck, tweed blazer, and jeans. And a pair of handmade cordovans by Edward Green. This particular style is called the Dundee. They look dressy until you notice the Vibram soles. The leather is of a double thickness. The Dundee is a shoe designed for touring the landed estates, for tromping through mud while wearing a tie, with your spaniels trailing behind. I had to wait four months for these shoes. On the shoebox it says: "Edward Green: Master Shoemakers to the Few." That's me exactly. The few."
post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duveen
Actually, according to Jeffrey Eugenides in Middlesex, they most certainly do:
"Since it was the weekend, I tried to dress down. It isn't easy for me. I wore a camel-hair turtleneck, tweed blazer, and jeans. And a pair of handmade cordovans by Edward Green. This particular style is called the Dundee. They look dressy until you notice the Vibram soles. The leather is of a double thickness. The Dundee is a shoe designed for touring the landed estates, for tromping through mud while wearing a tie, with your spaniels trailing behind. I had to wait four months for these shoes. On the shoebox it says: "Edward Green: Master Shoemakers to the Few." That's me exactly. The few."

I stand corrected
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Checks
Well, first, that's not my experience.

Second, and I think you'll agree, it's an entirely different stress level for the attorney. So, during a big trial, or on the eve of oral argument on a big motion or appeal, I might be out taking a jog, but my mind is going 100 mph, trying to figure every angle, every argument that will be made by an equally committed, educated, talented person who wants his client to win as much as I do.

I've been in trials where the other side is asking the jury for 175 million dollars, that will pucker your asshole for a month, becaue you know the jury is going to give that much if you lose.

The paralegal (I call them paranormals, because every one I've even known has been weird) doesn't have that level of stress. It's the difference between cleaning guns and being in the duel.

Sure, being a paralegal has an entirely different type and level of stress. My previous post was just responding to the idea that paralegals go home at 5. I know some large firms where the case managers have a higher billable hours requirement than the junior associates. Doing 240 hour months while being ordered around by snotty kids ten+ years younger than you is obviously a different level of stress than facing off over a $250MM dispute over a bilateral wholesale billing matter, but it isn't really an idyllic lifestyle.
post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by aybojs
i.e. why take a lower-paying public defender job when one could make much more as a big name private defense attorney?)

Ever heard of paying your dues? Many of the big name defense attorneys are former AUSAs, Deputy DAs, or Deputy PDs. Others worked their asses off defending DUIs and shoplifting cases until they landed a case that brought them into the upper tier. I don't know anyone who walked out of the bar exam and immediately became a "big name private defense attorney." Though I do know a couple who immediately needed a big name private defense attorney.
post #55 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro
Sure, being a paralegal has an entirely different type and level of stress. My previous post was just responding to the idea that paralegals go home at 5. I know some large firms where the case managers have a higher billable hours requirement than the junior associates. Doing 240 hour months while being ordered around by snotty kids ten+ years younger than you is obviously a different level of stress than facing off over a $250MM dispute over a bilateral wholesale billing matter, but it isn't really an idyllic lifestyle.

Very true.
post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro
Though I do know a couple who immediately needed a big name private defense attorney.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Turning points, the bar exam, etc.