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Hermes h belts

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
What's up with the Hermes H belts? I saw a woman wearing one in Barney's the other day, and a man wearing one a few months ago in Boston. They just seem to me the tackiest thing you can buy. They look so pretentious and gaudy. They also up the eurotrash quotient by 5. Anyone own one of these? What are your opinions?
post #2 of 19
I haven't paid any attention to them. How are they worse than, say, Gucci "G" belts? I always thought the Hérmès "H" had a graphical advantage in being less obviously and inescabably a letter.
post #3 of 19
I agree. I don't think they're that bad mainly because of what pstoller said--the graphical look. Plus Hermes is more exclusive that Gucci, and that has an effect on my perception of it. I think the Gucci G belt is worse.
post #4 of 19
Saw a whole bevy of French Eurotrash dudes shopping at Barneys and Saks like it was going out of style the week before Christmas (and it will be if these guys keep stinking out the joint). Typical look was: clothes too tight, too much black, way too much hair and way too much hair gel. Muscles too much on display. There was an old leader and a young leader of the pride. The old guy had tan wool slacks, a blue sportsjacket, an admittedly rather nice checked shirt, brown alligator skin belt, and loafers (ah... something gave him away.) Think Roman Holiday gone very, very wrong. The young leader had on a Hermes belt. Which jusdt goes to show that you can't buy your way out of the wrong Arrondisement. (BTW, these guys were buying a lot of stuff. It pains me to think that probably tens of thousands of dollars of clothes will contribute to making them, their Eurotrash families, and their Eurotrash friends look just like them).
post #5 of 19
What is "Eurotrash" Do I get a gentle whiff of American xenophobia? And that from guys who seem to buy European labels wholesale. Surely Prada, Armani, Jil Sander, Dior, D & G are all Eurotrash, while Brooks Bros, Abercrombie & Fitch, Oxxford are good all-American-kids. How many of you dress in an all-American way? Be it preppy, ivy-league East coast or cowboy boots and Stetson Texas style. In an age when the national characteristic of dress have all disappeared, at least the fact that different people put the same basic components together in a different way adds a bit of variety.
post #6 of 19
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What is "Eurotrash" Do I get a gentle whiff of American xenophobia? And that from guys who seem to buy European labels wholesale. Surely Prada, Armani, Jil Sander, Dior, D & G are all Eurotrash, while Brooks Bros, Abercrombie & Fitch, Oxxford are good all-American-kids.
Yes, bengal-stripe . I've seen this reference often but I've never seen the definition and I suspect there is some of the "Civilization stops at America's shores" way of thinking that is in some way due to introverted and xenophobic media and Hollywood productions (remember - the strange, wacky guy is always a foreigner). When I read eurotrash I think, newly-rich, no taste, and possibly some connections within the russian mafia. Please do not take this the wrong way (or ostracise me.); the members of this board are not the stereotypes I described above but this is a too common way of thinking on the west side of the pond.
post #7 of 19
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What is "Eurotrash?" Do I get a gentle whiff of American xenophobia?
I suppose that's one way of taking it, but it's not generally meant to tar all (nor most) of Europe with the same brush, any more than "the ugly American" is meant to apply to all Americans abroad. As Bjorn says, the look can be defined as, "newly-rich, no taste, and possibly some connections within the Russian mafia." It's not simply being European or wearing European clothes; it's a very specific mode of attitude, behavior and dress. It's not meant to imply that Americans are better. It's just that Americans have their own brand of nouveau riche impudence and tastelessness. We hate that just as much.
post #8 of 19
This is by far the most interesting post I have read in quite some time (even above the Jantzen scandal). I must agree with CTGuy in that Pstoller was very concise and equitable in his statement concerning the term "eurotrash." Though, in all honesty, we Americans do tend to look at some styles and ideas concerning both clothing and manner of dress contrary to our own as being strange and sometimes absurd. But, as I think any honest person would admit, that can be said of almost any society. Just as CTGuy pointed out, we have the term "white trash" and many other's that apply to those that "buy clothing from a man operating from the back of his truck on the side of a freeway" and who may "dress in the dark with both hands in oven mitts." Or, they can apply to my sister, who, as much as I love her, insist on wearing nothing but conflicting colours and styles, as if they are constantly afraid of getting hit by a bus at night. All of these statements are of course subjective and the definitions of these different views would vary widely from one person to another. I myself have a British friend that affixes the term "Yank Skank" to any American woman that inappropriately shows more than 70% of her body through the clothing she chooses to wear. Now, the meaning of inappropriately is obviously, again, idiosyncratic. For example, those living in Brazil may find this manner of dress acceptable or find it scandalous. It is merely decided by your personal taste and view of what is incongruous. Nonetheless, I still feel that these terms are fortuitous and reviling in their nature. Personally, I attempt not to use them. Though, admittedly, I sometimes am not successful. But, hey, it is the thought that counts...right?
post #9 of 19
I believe we are all repulsed by the vulgar conspicuous consumption that is part of the "Eurotrash" look and its American equilvalents.  But equally repulsive, I think, is the reaction often displayed to this: inconspicuous consumption.  That is, wearing clothing that only the highly fashionable would recognize in order to gain a feeling of exclusivity.  Both are equally narcissistic. I, and I think most others on this forum, simply wear what they feel stylish in.  Hell, I'd sew my own stylish clothes if I could.
post #10 of 19
Let's throw a few things into the debate: Good taste does not exist as an absolute, it cannot be measured, nor can it be defined outside one's particular cultural identity. Basically "Good taste" is always your own "Bad Taste" is always someone else's. Clothing, probably from the day when the first Neanderthal man discovered fur, has always been used to define yourself. You state which group you belong to and which group you reject. Dress is a way to show your tribal allegiances. In the olden days there might have been a national dress, but there were also strict rules what type of clothing you were allowed to wear, depending on your social position within society. (No shoe tips longer than x inches for commoners.) I believe (although I have never met anybody on this list in real life) there are some people posting here, which I would consider a fashion victim. Their style might not be my style. So what? It up to each individual to make his or her choices in life. Whatever item of clothing you put on, someone will admire you and someone will despise you. In the end it equals out pretty well. As the old saying goes: "One man's meat is another man's poison."
post #11 of 19
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Or, they can apply to my sister, who, as much as I love her, insist on wearing nothing but conflicting colours and styles, as if they are constantly afraid of getting hit by a bus at night.
My sister's an odd duck, as well. She's certainly capable of dressing well, and she recognizes good clothing and ensembles when she sees them. She does, however, lean towards the very worst colors for her complexion, often in bafflingly mismatched patterns (as if to say, "I'm trying to look bad"). Nobody with our family's signature pallor should wear bright orange anywhere near exposed skin; it makes us look like albinos with jaundice. Alas, if I dared to point this out, she'd take an overdose of Xanax.
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equally repulsive, I think, is the reaction often displayed to this: inconspicuous consumption. That is, wearing clothing that only the highly fashionable would recognize in order to gain a feeling of exclusivity. Both are equally narcissistic.
If that's your only reason for dressing that way, perhaps. But, I think the usual point of said "inconspicuous consumption" is to enjoy all the qualities of a well-made garment, including the fact that it's more flattering than a poorly made one, without calling undue attention to the name recognition value of a high-profile designer. You could argue that caring at all about how you look is narcissistic, but, as long as you're going to put some effort into your appearance, it's certainly better if you genuinely "pretty up" the place, as opposed to making everyone else look better by contrast.
post #12 of 19
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Good taste does not exist as an absolute, it cannot be measured, nor can it be defined outside one's particular cultural identity. Basically, "good taste" is always your own, "bad taste" is always someone else's.
Up to a point, I agree, but, within the confines of a culture, there are usually widely-acknowledged norms. For example, even in the limited context of American teen pop culture, it's pretty much a given that Christina Aguilera has such awful taste in clothing, she almost makes Mariah Carey look elegant. (At least Cher gives one the sense that she's doing the whole thing for a laugh.) I'll also admit that some of my own taste is, at the very least, questionable"”my "lizard king" lace-up leather pants, for example. But, hey, I get a kick out of my own tackiness.
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As the old saying goes: "One man's meat is another man's poison."
And here I thought it was, "One man's fish is another man's poisson."
post #13 of 19
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And here I thought it was, "One man's fish is another man's poisson."
That is the Good Friday version, lol. Oh, and poison is spelled with one "s" (at least that is how it is spelled here in the states).
post #14 of 19
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And here I thought it was, "One man's fish is another man's poisson."
That is the Good Friday version, lol. Oh, and poison is spelled with one "s" (at least that is how it is spelled here in the states).
Perhaps if you learned un peu de Français...
post #15 of 19
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If that's your only reason for dressing that way, perhaps. But, I think the usual point of said "inconspicuous consumption" is to enjoy all the qualities of a well-made garment, including the fact that it's more flattering than a poorly made one, without calling undue attention to the name recognition value of a high-profile designer.
I agree with your point completely.  Narcissism is tricky to define.  It is not about selfishness, but the maintenance of a false self. I wish more people did make an effort to pretty the place up a bit.  I feel like I'm swimming upstream against an alien culture of bad taste.  Hehe.
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If that's your only reason for dressing that way, perhaps. But, I think the usual point of said "inconspicuous consumption" is to enjoy all the qualities of a well-made garment, including the fact that it's more flattering than a poorly made one, without calling undue attention to the name recognition value of a high-profile designer.
I agree with your point completely.  Narcissism is tricky to define.  It is not about selfishness, but the maintenance of a false self. I wish more people did make an effort to pretty the place up a bit.  I feel like I'm swimming upstream against an alien culture of bad taste.  Hehe.
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