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How much do the cars in Tokyo Drift actually cost?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Just finished watching Tokyo Drift for the 2nd time. The more I look at those little drifter cars the more I like them. Sure call me a poser, but I'd like to learn more about modding cars and such.

That being said, how much do one of those cars, say Hans Veilside RX7 actually cost? EVO?
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashaansafin View Post
Just finished watching Tokyo Drift for the 2nd time. The more I look at those little drifter cars the more I like them. Sure call me a poser, but I'd like to learn more about modding cars and such.

That being said, how much do one of those cars, say Hans Veilside RX7 actually cost? EVO?


Quote:
The VeilSide RX-7 driven by Han used to be a special show car built by VeilSide and crowned "Best of Show 2005" at Tokyo Auto Salon, reportedly worth $150,000. Just the custom leather interior reported cost $20,000. Universal got it for $50,000, and the crew promptly destroyed both the interior and exterior by repainting both (with spray-paint).

I can't find any info on the EVO other than it was made RWD for drifting purposes with a custom transmission. That can't be cheap.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yea I read the same thing...so if I wanted to make the same car it would be 150k? Jesus, might as well get an Aston or something then.
post #4 of 10
I don't know anything about the cars in Tokyo Drift, but I used to be really into cars when I was younger. As with anything that takes a lot of customization, you're never going to get your money's worth. Quite the opposite, in many cases customization devalues the car because it makes it appealing only to a niche market. This means that you're going to end up spending a lot of money, enough that you could probably buy a really nice car, but you're not getting much quantifiable value. The reason this doesn't matter for people who like to customize cars is because the actual work is as enjoyable to them as the car, but if you remove this from the equation you're seldom going to find it's worth it.
post #5 of 10
give or take a few thousand over what the "blue book" of the car would be worth. over there, mods on cars being sold is common, but completely overlooked. Here in the states, if someone mods a car, they feel they need to list every damn bolt that has been "modified." I was over in Japan when my buddy bought his Type R, our RSX. It was listed as stock, nothing additional added, and the sales guy didnt say anything. We popped the hood, and there was a Mugen Intake and Mugen strut bar. High dollar US price items, maybe not as much over there. At any rate, he paid the going price of the car, not the mods.
post #6 of 10
When I see mods, I see a car that was often driven hard. Decrease in value for me. Hard to find, for example, a pristine Supra that wasn't modded, and when I was looking for one, I'd find ones where you could see where mods had been pulled off to try and present the car as a stock one...

What you should do is just buy someone else's modded car that is close to what you want. Let someone else pour a ton of money into it and reap the benefits. Of course, if you like doing your own wrenching, that is great. Or, if you are going to drive it into the ground, then do what you want.
post #7 of 10
Being in the modified car world since 2003, having built my own Lexus project here is my own experience. It really depends on the mentality that you choose to build your car. How much is your budget? are you willing to use the best authentic and quality parts or just start from a beaten up car and knock off parts that require a lot of extra work to get completed? Great show cars with all the fixins' can total more than 70k+ but if you're looking at cars like the Veilside Rx7 that has been in the movie, been through show circuits around the world, magazines, books, and is immensely popular and widely known, the cars market price can sky rocket because rich people will want to buy a car that is famous and well known and one off. Let's say you start with an rx-7 and maybe its current value for one in good condition is 17k+ Then you want the veilside full widebody aero parts? 10k+ Body work and paint? 4-6k+ Rims and tires? 4k+ basic bolt on engine parts? 3k? Turbo and extreme engine build parts? 10k+ Interior? race seats? steering wheels? meters and gauges? new upholstery? custom lighting? stereo? 10k Akatsuki is for the most part correct, most car builders build the entire car as a project but after this project is completed, they are looking for something new to do, now when this happens they have to sell the car at a severe loss because nobody wants to buy a modded used car at full retail price for 70-100k when they can buy a brand new, fast and great looking car like Corvette or GTR. The downside to buying a finished car is that it wasn't your own, it wasn't done by your imagination, you wouldnt know how to appreciate it, you have no passion for it, that is why everybody chooses to build their own project, whether it be on budget or what not. Hope this helps.
post #8 of 10
just get the skyline gtr...
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrG View Post
I don't know anything about the cars in Tokyo Drift, but I used to be really into cars when I was younger. As with anything that takes a lot of customization, you're never going to get your money's worth. Quite the opposite, in many cases customization devalues the car because it makes it appealing only to a niche market. This means that you're going to end up spending a lot of money, enough that you could probably buy a really nice car, but you're not getting much quantifiable value. The reason this doesn't matter for people who like to customize cars is because the actual work is as enjoyable to them as the car, but if you remove this from the equation you're seldom going to find it's worth it.

This is the same case with bespoke clothes. Do an ebay search for Saville Row tailors and inevitably quite a few suits turn up. These go for substantially lower than a used brand name suit, unless the measurements really fit the majority of people out there. Also, people who spend a lot of dough on cars, or clothes for that matter, often don't do it with the intention to sell. This is the reason why I hate divorcee auctions...those wives can be so heartless, selling customized motor cars and guitars for the weight in tuna cans.
post #10 of 10
If you are just getting into drifting then you are several years behind the curve, especially if Tokyo Drift is what made you want to start.

Wanna get into it? Dont bother with fancy bodykits and shit, start with something easy and cheap like an S13/14 240SX and drive it till the KA blows up then put in a SR20DET or something. You will probably fuck up a lot and boner the body several times so its best to learn on something like this. If you want to be serious about it, find a local racing club with older guys in it. Most of the kids who start "Clubs" are a bunch of trend hopping clowns that will more than likely get you into more shit than you want. When I was in WA I was part of "Auto Sports North West" which was an Auto Cross club but they also did drift events and rally x. Its a good way to get into the sport safely and legally.
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