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Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1367

post #20491 of 20750

Shoes that are made with blake construction method can be resoled (in fact they are the easier to be resoled) !! On the other questions you have made i think Munky have covered it up really well!

post #20492 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

Shoes that are made with blake construction method can be resoled (in fact they are the easier to be resoled) !! On the other questions you have made i think Munky have covered it up really well!

I guess it depends on your point of view. Blake must be sewn from the inside of the shoe through to the outsole. Not only does this punch another set of holes in the insole, but all too often the thread can be felt underfoot.

And it requires a specialized machine that not every shoe repair has access to. As a result, some repair shops simply cement a new sole right over the old one, but by that time and with the necessary roughing of the old outsole, the threads are often cut or damaged.

So yes, the outsole can be replaced but, in my professional opinion, it is not as easy as welted work or even Blake-Rapid...and it is especially not as easy to do it correctly.

FWIW...
post #20493 of 20750
@DWFII correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't a lot of the shoemaker's access and competence be based off of market preferences? I'd imagine many more cobblers have the blake machine and technical competence/experience in Italy than say, the US.
post #20494 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by thefastlife View Post

any thoughts on these for wear with chinos? are they ugly?

also, side question: can Blake Construction be resoled?

thanks.




Are they ugly? You don't know if you like the shoes or not?uhoh.gif
post #20495 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by saint View Post

These are definitely bookbinder:

http://www.yoox.com/us/44858796QB/item#dept=men&sts=sr_men80&cod10=44858796QB&sizeId=

I bought a pair of the brown loafers you show in your post and they are regular calfskin. I also bought a pair of brogues and they are bookbinder and will be returned. Any of the absurdly shiny shoes like the ones I linked to above are, in all likelihood, bookbinder.

Can you post pictures before you return the SM brogues?

Thanks,
post #20496 of 20750
Of course:





Sorry for pics, didn't have time this morning to set them up nicely. The leather is thin and really plasticky, I've never been a fan of bookbinder, so back they'll go.
post #20497 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by usctrojans31 View Post

@DWFII correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't a lot of the shoemaker's access and competence be based off of market preferences? I'd imagine many more cobblers have the blake machine and technical competence/experience in Italy than say, the US.

You may be perfectly correct, I don't know.

All I'm saying is that when a shoe (or any other item) is repaired, the idea is to return it, as close as possible, to its original state. Resoling Blake correctly is not a gimme and, IMO, not as easy as resoling welted or B-R.

And even if the repairman has access to a Blake machine, that seam is more or less a blind seam--the horn of the machine is inside the shoe during repair, where it cannot be seen nor controlled in detail. So new holes are being made in the insole that, more often than not, do not correspond with the old ones. Not good.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 2/26/16 at 7:05am
post #20498 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I guess it depends on your point of view. Blake must be sewn from the inside of the shoe through to the outsole. Not only does this punch another set of holes in the insole, but all too often the thread can be felt underfoot.

And it requires a specialized machine that not every shoe repair has access to. As a result, some repair shops simply cement a new sole right over the old one, but by that time and with the necessary roughing of the old outsole, the threads are often cut or damaged.

So yes, the outsole can be replaced but, in my professional opinion, it is not as easy as welted work or even Blake-Rapid...and it is especially not as easy to do it correctly.

FWIW...

  I have answered according to the pairs he have posted!!

 

   Generally in most European countries (U.K aside ) is more common to see a Blake stitching machine than a G.W/blake -rapid machine in a cobblers shop ! Btw the cobbler witch the services i use said to me that for him is much easier  to resole a blake stitched  pair than a GW  or a Blake-rapid ! (i have given to him to resole every kind of shoes   and did really great job to all of them , btw he makes shoes too but dont hand welts them for cost reasons) !

 

    I think this is why he has to repair blake stitched shoes in a ratio 8/10  so he is very experienced in that kind of repair! In a pair i gave him to resole with blake stitching method he aligned the needle with the existing holes of the insole and set the stitch length according to the preexisting holes!(to be honest i suspect that most dont get to that trouble )

 

 Always happy to hear and learn from DWFII!:happy: 

post #20499 of 20750
I think this is just the case for southern Europe @benhour. In the northwestern and central/eastern parts it's mostly GYW machines I've seen.
post #20500 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schweino View Post

I think this is just the case for southern Europe @benhour. In the northwestern and central/eastern parts it's mostly GYW machines I've seen.

 I think mostly in northwestern (cause of the weather i can asume  and tradition) the GYW are more common !! Gennerally i dont think he would have any problem to find a cobbler that can resole a blake stitched anywhere  or use a GYW/blake-rapid machine to stitch a sole over the preexisting one!! (i think that is possible  and DWfii can verify this as a very reputable shoemaker with a lot of experience )

post #20501 of 20750
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post #20502 of 20750
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post #20503 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by saint View Post

Of course:





Sorry for pics, didn't have time this morning to set them up nicely. The leather is thin and really plasticky, I've never been a fan of bookbinder, so back they'll go.

You saved the trouble of buying and returning. Never seen poor quality SM footwear.

Thanks,
post #20504 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr monty View Post

You saved the trouble of buying and returning. Never seen poor quality SM footwear.

Thanks,

Quite a few Italian top makers are going into CG. Sad to see.
post #20505 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr monty View Post

You saved the trouble of buying and returning. Never seen poor quality SM footwear.

Thanks,

Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Quite a few Italian top makers are going into CG. Sad to see.

I was surprised as well, I thought that the pictures on Yoox looked like bookbinder, but figured that it was worth a shot given the past quality of SM. As Meister says, CG is becoming more common among high-quality shoe makers, and that's really sad. Certainly more circumspection regarding shoes on Yoox may be warranted.

That said, Yoox still remains a decent source for shoes, the Gruppo Clark fatte a mano Norvegese brogues and Grenson G1 suede brogues I picked up were absolute steals at roughly $130 each.
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