or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1334

post #19996 of 20750
I was going to share a link to Weston's site as I had a feeling that they use this method...but there's on info online.

For what it's worth, the old printing of Roetzel's Gentleman book has a photo of the Church's factory, and the method is there, so Church's shoes have likely used it at some point. Likely not anymore.
post #19997 of 20750

I believe there must be plenty of the JMW machines to produce insoles "a la Weston" in some of their models in the market.  All the old GYW shoemaking videos posted here show this machine working in those factories many yers ago .  The point is that, on one hand,  they need thicker and good quality insoles to produce the feather and leather ribbon and on the other the factory requires an extra shoemaking process.  So more cost of materials, more manpower and more machinery and inputs required equal to much higher costs of production.  So those machines must be in anycase full of dust in someones wharehouse corner. 

post #19998 of 20750
G&G

St James II, Rothschild and Barclay


post #19999 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

I was going to share a link to Weston's site as I had a feeling that they use this method...but there's on info online.

For what it's worth, the old printing of Roetzel's Gentleman book has a photo of the Church's factory, and the method is there, so Church's shoes have likely used it at some point. Likely not anymore.

I have the most recent edition of Roetzel's book, and that is still in there. He says that they keep the old method as a "fall back" if necessary. I don't know what that is supposed to mean. Perhaps they run out of gemming sometimes, or if the gemming application machine breaks down, then they can keep making shoes.
post #20000 of 20750
wurger that's a terrific lineup of quality footwear.
post #20001 of 20750
...and I still cannot understand why Roetzel has ranked Church's as the finest shoemaker in England, when Edward Green and John Lobb Paris were active (and better) when the book was published. Well, given R.'s background in marketing, I have a feeling that he was paid to write so, and give plenty of photo space for the factory. Not a nice thing to do as those with no better knowledge are apt to believe him.
post #20002 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

...and I still cannot understand why Roetzel has ranked Church's as the finest shoemaker in England, when Edward Green and John Lobb Paris were active (and better) when the book was published. ...

Not a nice thing to do as those with no better knowledge are apt to believe him.


Repeated for felicity.
post #20003 of 20750
Wonderful collection Wurger. You get many comments at work?
post #20004 of 20750
I posted that Thom McAn video initially.

The thing that got me was the number of processes to produce a shoe that cost what $10 in 1930s money or less?

Yet everyone got to wear magnificent shoes. I have many pairs from that era that I still wear to work.

Probably modern economics would hate the lack of turn over as well.

Someone asked George Glasgow Snr about how long a pair of Cleverley shoes should last...and he said 30 years.

Some of my shoes are nearly 80 years old produced in factories like that video. QED.
post #20005 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Wonderful collection Wurger. You get many comments at work?

The only comment I get is that I have problems! And nice shoes but I should get them some too.
post #20006 of 20750
Meister, I'm sure G. Snr. meant that their shoes will last 30 years of wear. If your 80+ shuus have been sitting in a closet for most of their existence, a comparison may not be drawn. I have two pairs of Edwin Clapps from the '50s or '60s and both are in excellent shape, but neither has been worn much. What I can compare, however, is the upper leathers used on olden pairs and the ones I see on mid-tier GW factory shoes. The old leathers, on average, are superb, but I cannot say how long they will last. I'll know better in three decades or so.
post #20007 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

The only comment I get is that I have problems! And nice shoes but I should get them some too.

You can never have a problem when you wear nice shoes. First thing women look at they reckon.
post #20008 of 20750

Little shoe shining today, I enjoy it but hard to find the time.

Lobbs shine up the easiest.

post #20009 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzmenco View Post
 

Little shoe shining today, I enjoy it but hard to find the time.

Lobbs shine up the easiest.

How do you get those shine?..... When I do it it just looks waxy and dry. :(  Nice collection btw.

post #20010 of 20750

Sorry to be the downer... But I have a real concern. This forum has many people with more knowledge and experience than I have.  I have a danite sole shoes from C&J and the stitch on the tip of the sole on the bottom is wearing out.  But, the glue is still holding strong.  Should I be worried?

 

 

 I seen something like this (Not my picture's got them from the C&J forum)  

 

Thanks!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II