or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1317

post #19741 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelonius View Post


Very very nice. But where have they been the last 70 years ? Not being worn apparently.

In hibernation in (luckily) prime conditions... and now worn by me maybe 2-3 times per year.
post #19742 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by isshinryu101 View Post

In hibernation in (luckily) prime conditions... and now worn by me maybe 2-3 times per year.

Noice shoes. How is the leather on these new old stock vintage finds? Do you have to do much to bring them back to life?
post #19743 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I've folded surprisingly elaborate and curved edges, with no problem, so I'm not sure why a maker would elect to just leave the cut edges of the leather raw unless they just don't want to be bothered.]

Folding edges can be a fully automated process and has been, at least here in the UK, traditionally the trade-mark of mass produced lower end shoes. English bespoke shoes never had folded edges as a properly done cut-edge (skived, singed, edge-dressed and burnished) with slip-beading for the top line) will take more time to produce than a folded edge.

To paraphrase Margaret Thatcher: "You turn if you want to, some are not for turning."




Quote:
Folding can be efficiently and quickly done by machine; the BUSMAC Models 'H' and 'J' are in general use and a skilled operative will produce excellent results. The edge is lifted, turned over and tapped down as the section is fed through the machine. The feed is controlled to facilitate different curves and allow pleating and a knife attachment can be brought into work to cut the concave curves. The machine is treadle-controlled leaving the operator with free hands to guide the work.

The BUSMAC No. 2 Rapid taping and folding machine is similar to the model 'J' but has an attachment to feed a 3/16 in. tape to the leather while folding' the turn of the edge lapping the tape, which has previously run through a quick drying cement. This gives a firm top line when applied to quarters.

J H Thornton "Textbook of Footwear manufacture"
post #19744 of 20750

^^^ Great info - thanks.

post #19745 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by isshinryu101 View Post

1940's Allen Edmonds Oxford captoe






Beautiful icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #19746 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

Noice shoes. How is the leather on these new old stock vintage finds? Do you have to do much to bring them back to life?

Thanks. The leather varies from pair to pair. Like modern shoes, there was great leather & also some inexpensive stuff as well. However, it is really the luck of the draw when it comes to dryness. Storage conditions, temperature and humidity. Some shoes are so dry they are literally turning to dust. This pair was pristine. In honesty, when you do have leather than can be "revived", it usually will require more use of conditioner and cream polish throughout the rest of its life. This pair is treated like my modern shoes and happy for it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr monty View Post

Beautiful icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Thanks, my friend!
post #19747 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Folding edges can be a fully automated process and has been, at least here in the UK, traditionally the trade-mark of mass produced lower end shoes. English bespoke shoes never had folded edges as a properly done cut-edge (skived, singed, edge-dressed and burnished) with slip-beading for the top line) will take more time to produce than a folded edge.

But the topline is not the issue...everybody does that with the topline. Except when they fold it, of course. And BTW, that's all mechanized / roboticized too. I venture to say that few makers...even the solitary outworkers...make their own slip-bead.

It's the vamp edge and the toe cap edge that seem raw to me. Now that's just my opinion but I've done both and to hand fold a peaked toe cap, for instance...or around the vamp...and do it so that it's dead on the pattern and the same as the other one is not a gimme.

That said, I don't doubt it's been mechanized. I am not alone when I say however, that as a maker, I'm not.

--
Edited by DWFII - 12/11/14 at 6:05pm
post #19748 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

.........so I'm not sure why a maker would elect to just leave the cut edges of the leather raw unless they just don't want to be bothered.

Ryota Hayafuji - un-folded but not unfinished edges at it's finest:




Obviously a question of choice, as the tan facing seems to have folded edges, in addition to slip-beading.


http://hayafuji.tumblr.com/
post #19749 of 20750
Wore my (nearly 29 years old) old dog favourite boots today. Just like a pair of slippers!

post #19750 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

un-folded but not unfinished edges at it's finest:

I'm glad you posted that photo--it makes a nice (and revealing) contrast to the vintage Allen Edmonds.

Apparently, even the "finest" is none too good...in my opinion, that edge looks raw--unfinished and graceless. Of course that's just from the perspective of someone who has done the work for most of his adult life.
Quote:
Obviously a question of choice, as the tan facing seems to have folded edges, in addition to slip-beading.

It may be a question of choice...nearly everything is, even those choices that are informed by expediency. But look again--the facings are raw edged as well. On a folded edge you will not see a "corner"...such as you see here...on the edge.

The difference is that the facings are "struck through," so the colour on the edge is the same as the colour on the grain surface. Just the opposite of the leather on the vamps and toe cap...the leather is not struck through and the raw edge contrasts with the grain...accentuating the common inelegance of the edge.

IMO...

--
Edited by DWFII - 12/12/14 at 7:56am
post #19751 of 20750
Those are very well preserved Cleav!

Thanks for the good info as always bengal-stripe.
post #19752 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleav View Post

Wore my (nearly 29 years old) old dog favourite boots today. Just like a pair of slippers! Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Great. What are they?

Mine are more like 29 days old, but were baptized today:

XctCGGO.jpg

Jeans soaked, socks dry. smile.gif
post #19753 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Great. What are they?

Mine are more like 29 days old, but were baptized today:

XctCGGO.jpg

Jeans soaked, socks dry. smile.gif

What models are these?
post #19754 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


That said, I don't doubt it's been mechanized. I am not alone when I say however, that as a maker, I'm not.

--

THIS is the point!!! Of course so many of the steps in shoemaking have been mechanized in order to turn out more shoes, faster & cheaper. You really can't compare the "mechanized version" of a shoemaking process to the same process being performed truly by hand.
post #19755 of 20750
Quote:
Originally Posted by laufer View Post

What models are these?

Herring Langdale (made by Cheaney).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II