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Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1192

post #17866 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Not answering that one...long standing policy--don't speak ill of other shoemakers.

That said, I do and will talk about technique. What was it Winston Churchill said when he was confronted by a hideous old self-righteous crone? "I may, indeed, be drunk madam, but in the morning I shall be sober while you'll still be ugly." They can be made with the greatest of care...as I said a master shoemaker...but in the end they're still cement construction.

You do realize that even cliches are bored by you.
post #17867 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Back to the Future today.

Late 1930s Crosby Square Spade soled captoes.

 

wow ... cool ... beautiful ... a form to scream!

post #17868 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianni Cerutti View Post
 

 

wow ... cool ... beautiful ... a form to scream!

 

Couldn't have put it better, everything about them works.

post #17869 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossoz View Post
 

Oreo,

 

I have a question for the cobbler.

 

I am a male, 5'4" and weigh about 138 lbs.  I destroy shoes quickly because I supinate and they always roll to the outside and soon look worn out.  This especially true of my golf shoes and loafers.  For golf I wear FJ Dry Joys, which are fairly sturdy shoes, but they do not last long due to the problem I described.  Since I wear a 7M and tend to have a high foot (?), I do not have room for an orthotic with any thickness.  Somehow I would like to build up the outside edge either inside or outside very slightly to help alleviate my problem.

 

I would appreciate any ideas you can share with me.

 

Thank you in advance.........

I think you may want to look back into insoles. I have customers with insoles that were specially made for them to relieve walking 'disorders', and with it you might want to find shoes that will accommodate them. Realistically there is no way to build up the outside edge of a shoe, but i would discuss with your local cobbler some options, maybe even stick on soles which are easily replaceable when worn down and considerably cheaper than most other repair work. 

post #17870 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by OREO View Post
 

I think you may want to look back into insoles. I have customers with insoles that were specially made for them to relieve walking 'disorders', and with it you might want to find shoes that will accommodate them. Realistically there is no way to build up the outside edge of a shoe, but i would discuss with your local cobbler some options, maybe even stick on soles which are easily replaceable when worn down and considerably cheaper than most other repair work. 

Oreo,

 

I found a foot and ankle clinic close to home and will visit next week to check out insoles or ???

 

Thanks for the input.

post #17871 of 20649

The clinic is probably the best place to get the best answer/solution for your condition, i hope they are able to help you.

oreo

post #17872 of 20649
Back to the Future - Day 2

Late 30s /early 40s Bostonians mild spades. With all the wet weather in Sydney did not want to go out in anything flimsy.

post #17873 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Back to the Future - Day 2

Late 30s /early 40s Bostonians mild spades. With all the wet weather in Sydney did not want to go out in anything flimsy.

That's a pair of really sturdy shoes!  Very nice.

 

BTW, I note that they show quite some wrinkles on the forepart - are they too loose there?  But there a bug inverted V where you tie the laces.  Are the insteps of the shoes too low?   

post #17874 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

That's a pair of really sturdy shoes!  Very nice.

BTW, I note that they show quite some wrinkles on the forepart - are they too loose there?  But there a bug inverted V where you tie the laces.  Are the insteps of the shoes too low?   

1930s/early 40s shoes are notoriously narrow in the lacing area. The wrinkling is just a product of age and the previous user.

They had very little wear despite being 70+- years old. Probably sitting in some closet somewhere. Nice waisted mild spade sole. On went the Topy good for another few years.

American vintage quality.

This is what America has lost.
post #17875 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

1930s/early 40s shoes are notoriously narrow in the lacing area. The wrinkling is just a product of age and the previous user.

They had very little wear despite being 70+- years old. Probably sitting in some closet somewhere. Nice waisted mild spade sole. On went the Topy good for another few years.

American vintage quality.

This is what America has lost.

I'm sure I won't look that good at 70, my friend!
post #17876 of 20649
1950's Edwin Clapp Saddle Oxfords, 10D.

The ST is one of the most gorgeous skins of all time. Such a shame they were hunted so heavily in the 1980's. I don't see even the Japanese (who will use Sealskin in a heartbeat) breaking CITES and using them. Of course, in the 1950's, ST was 100% legal and still abundant.



post #17877 of 20649

Good lord they're amazing!

post #17878 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by isshinryu101 View Post

1950's Edwin Clapp Saddle Oxfords, 10D.



Look at the perfect bookmatching of the hide on the two shoes. Edwin Clapp was something else.
post #17879 of 20649
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


Look at the perfect bookmatching of the hide on the two shoes. Edwin Clapp was something else.

excellent eye, my friend. I, too was impressed with the symmetry... especially considering that ST is a VERY asymetrical skin to begin with. Mych more difficult than gator or croc.
post #17880 of 20649

Cross post from the Riccardo Bestetti-thread: Received my pair from Riccardo Bestetti this week, a pair of Maverick in antique tan, Novecento semi-bespoke line. Like expected truly amazing shoes, and Riccardo has been a pleasure to deal with. On my blog ( http://www.shoegazing.se ) there's a complete buying guide to Bestettis RTW, MTO and semi-bespoke offerings, pictures of lasts and models, prices, how to order and so on. Also a short review of the shoes. Written in Swedish, but you can use the translation tool on the upper right of the page to make it understandable.

 

Here are a bunch of pics of the shoes:

 

 

 

 


 

MORE PICTURES HERE! (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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