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Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1191

post #17851 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Back to the Future today.


Late 1930s Crosby Square Spade soled captoes.


These are gorgeous. When I save up enough coin, I want to commission a pair similar to these from DWF.
post #17852 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

+1
He put in a lot of care into that shoe. Although I did think to myself, "it's a shame they are glued..."

Funny, because that's probably what hand lasted aficionados think when they see Goodyear welted shoes from the likes of EG, GG, JLP smile.gif

He's a master by anyone's lights...and certified as such in his native land. No one can gainsay him that.

But it's still cement construction. alien.gif
post #17853 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Back to the Future today.



Late 1930s Crosby Square Spade soled captoes.



 



Different, but very cool. I like 'em a lot.
post #17854 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

+1
He put in a lot of care into that shoe. Although I did think to myself, "it's a shame they are glued..."

Funny, because that's probably what hand lasted aficionados think when they see Goodyear welted shoes from the likes of EG, GG, JLP smile.gif

He's a master by anyone's lights...and certified as such in his native land. No one can gainsay him that.

But it's still cement construction. alien.gif

Does the cemented construction have practical effects on how the shoes feel/wear? Or does it mainly come into play with resoling or durability?
post #17855 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post


Does the cemented construction have practical effects on how the shoes feel/wear? Or does it mainly come into play with resoling or durability?

 

I imagine they would be extremely flexible.

post #17856 of 19234
Is that a negative? I can imagine that some might consider that a feature.
post #17857 of 19234
Like everything else, it depends on the rest of the choices made--how thick is the insole? What is the insole made of? How well is the thickness of the upper merged into the thickness of the insole? How thick is the outsole, what is it made of?

Such construction does affect durability and it does affect flexibility and it does affect overall weight. Except for the first bit...which is perfunctorily dismissed as not applicable to fashion shoes...reduced weight and increased flexibility are the main objectives.
post #17858 of 19234
Thanks for your response. If I may, another question: How would the shoes made in the linked video fare in your opinion? To my uneducated eye, it seemed like they were made with great care.
post #17859 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Is that a negative? I can imagine that some might consider that a feature.

 

Flexibility itself isn't a negative.  Many people like that, others don't like "flimsy" feeling shoes.  To each his own in that regard.  The durability question is a completely separate issue, I was just responding to your query about how the shoe would feel/wear.

post #17860 of 19234
Not answering that one...long standing policy--don't speak ill of other shoemakers.

That said, I do and will talk about technique. What was it Winston Churchill said when he was confronted by a hideous old self-righteous crone? "I may, indeed, be drunk madam, but in the morning I shall be sober while you'll still be ugly." They can be made with the greatest of care...as I said a master shoemaker...but in the end they're still cement construction.
post #17861 of 19234
smile.gif
post #17862 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Not answering that one...long standing policy--don't speak ill of other shoemakers.

That said, I do and will talk about technique. What was it Winston Churchill said when he was confronted by a hideous old self-righteous crone? "I may, indeed, be drunk madam, but in the morning I shall be sober while you'll still be ugly." They can be made with the greatest of care...as I said a master shoemaker...but in the end they're still cement construction.

 

Well said.

post #17863 of 19234

I work as a cobbler and a recurring theme at work is the sole separating from the rest of the shoe with a cemented construction. However i believe that water is the main culprit, causing the glue to break down. If going with a cemented construction i would definitely avoid exposure to water. Cemented shoes are more suitable for the summer and definitely not for winter.   

post #17864 of 19234
Quote:
Originally Posted by OREO View Post
 

I work as a cobbler and a recurring theme at work is the sole separating from the rest of the shoe with a cemented construction. However i believe that water is the main culprit, causing the glue to break down. If going with a cemented construction i would definitely avoid exposure to water. Cemented shoes are more suitable for the summer and definitely not for winter.   

Oreo,

 

I have a question for the cobbler.

 

I am a male, 5'4" and weigh about 138 lbs.  I destroy shoes quickly because I supinate and they always roll to the outside and soon look worn out.  This especially true of my golf shoes and loafers.  For golf I wear FJ Dry Joys, which are fairly sturdy shoes, but they do not last long due to the problem I described.  Since I wear a 7M and tend to have a high foot (?), I do not have room for an orthotic with any thickness.  Somehow I would like to build up the outside edge either inside or outside very slightly to help alleviate my problem.

 

I would appreciate any ideas you can share with me.

 

Thank you in advance.........

post #17865 of 19234
I have a feeling that some may have missed the point with regard to Marcell's video. In addition to being a master shoemaker, he is also a dedicated teacher of shoemaking. He teaches the cemented shoe technique first in his series of courses because, I think, he believes that mastery of this technique is required in order for a person to become a shoemaker. He also teaches courses on designing and making fully handwelted shoes and he has made and posted many videos showing his handwelting technique. He normally does not use the cemented technique for his bespoke customers (including the shoes he made for me) unless the customer specifies that technique. He uses the cemented shoe technique as a teaching tool for beginning shoemakers. He is dedicated to preserving and teaching his craft and this video is just one of those teaching tools.
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