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Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1093

post #16381 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsteRed View Post



My thoughts exactly! Thanks for being honest, guys!

Yes, tramp stamps don't belong on a man's shoes, or anywhere else on a man.
post #16382 of 19138


My new Alden saddles
post #16383 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by jesask View Post



My new Alden saddles

good looking saddles, wear in good health
post #16384 of 19138
cigar nst
argyles otc

post #16385 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsteRed View Post

These are the double monks I've been talking about, honestly i think there is a lot of place for improvement, what would SF say?
 

 

Some specifics, from my amateur perspective.  Perhaps someone more technically knowledgeable could jump in and correct me, but for now:

 

- Leather: looks like some kind of stamped pseudo-shrunken pattern.  I don't like it (I don't like "hatchgrain" either, even if the sainted G&G do use it; looks tacky to me).  A no-cap monk is a lovely shoe for showing off leather, and this ain't it.  I'd go for something with a bit of depth and warmth to it - check out some of Vass's leathers for example.  Or even suede is lovely in this style.  But textures, I think, look best on heavy country shoes and boots, or in combination e.g. on a spectator.  And I don't like this texture anyway, even if it's a natural one (I can't really tell), I don't think it suits this elegant shoe.

 

- Which isn't elegant.  Again, the thick waist, loose-looking heel, and the wide, untapered, angular strap,  make it look heavy and clumsy.  Pinch the waist, give the heel some shape and structure, and maybe look at how the lines of the last work over the vamp.  Giving the welt some shape might help too.

 

- The hardware on the straps is cheap-looking and ugly.  I sympathise - I find it hard to get these bits and pieces e.g. good suit buttons or laces, in the small country where I live.  But if they don't have the good stuff, order it.  Or don't get this style.  Find some buckles with a nicer, softer, maybe heavier shape.  These make your shoes look like a plastic Chinese satchel.

 

- I don't like the medallion on the front, and that there is one on the back at all.  Interesting idea, but unless it's awesome it's not working. And this isn't awesome.  Also, going for a saddle type thing to continue the line of the strap is something that e.g. St Crispin's do to pleasing effect.  But this is shit.  I'd leave it plain.  Also, drop the contrast stitching; it's not working here.

 

- Finally, these are new shoes, so why are they lying so funny?  The soles aren't flat, and seem to become shallower at the tip of the toe, which spoils the lines of the shoe (such as they are); if anything, it should go the other way.

 

So...yeah...I think you need to work on your lasts with the maker first of all to get a bit more elegance and flatter your foot.  And then kick him in the nuts and go over the details of what you want next.

post #16386 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

Some specifics, from my amateur perspective.  Perhaps someone more technically knowledgeable could jump in and correct me, but for now:

- Leather: looks like some kind of stamped pseudo-shrunken pattern.  I don't like it (I don't like "hatchgrain" either, even if the sainted G&G do use it; looks tacky to me).  A no-cap monk is a lovely shoe for showing off leather, and this ain't it.  I'd go for something with a bit of depth and warmth to it - check out some of Vass's leathers for example.  Or even suede is lovely in this style.  But textures, I think, look best on heavy country shoes and boots, or in combination e.g. on a spectator.  And I don't like this texture anyway, even if it's a natural one (I can't really tell), I don't think it suits this elegant shoe.

- Which isn't elegant.  Again, the thick waist, loose-looking heel, and the wide, untapered, angular strap,  make it look heavy and clumsy.  Pinch the waist, give the heel some shape and structure, and maybe look at how the lines of the last work over the vamp.  Giving the welt some shape might help too.

- The hardware on the straps is cheap-looking and ugly.  I sympathise - I find it hard to get these bits and pieces e.g. good suit buttons or laces, in the small country where I live.  But if they don't have the good stuff, order it.  Or don't get this style.  Find some buckles with a nicer, softer, maybe heavier shape.  These make your shoes look like a plastic Chinese satchel.

- I don't like the medallion on the front, and that there is one on the back at all.  Interesting idea, but unless it's awesome it's not working. And this isn't awesome.  Also, going for a saddle type thing to continue the line of the strap is something that e.g. St Crispin's do to pleasing effect.  But this is shit.  I'd leave it plain.  Also, drop the contrast stitching; it's not working here.

- Finally, these are new shoes, so why are they lying so funny?  The soles aren't flat, and seem to become shallower at the tip of the toe, which spoils the lines of the shoe (such as they are); if anything, it should go the other way.

So...yeah...I think you need to work on your lasts with the maker first of all to get a bit more elegance and flatter your foot.  And then kick him in the nuts and go over the details of what you want next.


Wow! I can't say how much i appreciate that you've put so much energy and time into writing this response, thank you immensely!
post #16387 of 19138
AS Moore MTO. Time patina

post #16388 of 19138
^ fantastic.
post #16389 of 19138
Fullb, those are great. How'd you get that patina?
post #16390 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by fullb View Post

AS Moore MTO. Time patina


Truly beautiful! The patina looks very much like Bestettis antiquing.
post #16391 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by gyasih View Post

Fullb, those are great. How'd you get that patina?

Thank you all.

The base leather was really great regarding colour and quality. I have polished them regularly with different safir cream colour. This is just the result after about 2 years of regular maintenance. I can say I like the result and I love to wear them.
post #16392 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsteRed View Post


Wow! I can't say how much i appreciate that you've put so much energy and time into writing this response, thank you immensely!

 

Red, you're more than welcome.  It's all very well seeing lovely pictures of some accountant's new G&Gs every week - and I enjoy them.   But if you bother to stick your neck out and hold something of yours up for criticism, it deserves a constructive response.  Not that many people actually want criticism, but I figured that you were genuinely asking for it, and tried to be specific rather than saying "those are fucking ugly".  And on the bright side, they're not made of python. lol8[1].gif

 

I do think the key to what you're doing with your shoemaker, is the last shapes.  Even your other shoes, some of which I find quirky in a good way, are held back by a slightly old-fashioned and heavy last.  You're clearly in a good working relationship with this guy because he's cheap, local and knows how to hand-make shoes.  The rest now is up to you I think: creative types and artisans do get attached to their way of doing things, but if you know him well enough, it's worth trying to get some changes.  Take along some ready-mades you have with a nice shape.  Show some pictures.  Talk about extending the toe just a touch, maybe trying a "soft square" or chisel-toe too.  And I think the main practical things are to try to get a more tapered waist, and some shape and tightness in the heel.  Even if you want a more heavy, Austro-Hungarian style toe, cutting the welt into a slightly more defined and deliberate shape, moulding the heel and perhaps pinching the waist, can transform what you're having made.

 

I hope some of the shoe-making masters in the forum will give you some ideas and practical tips to pass on - maybe even some pictures of a shoe under construction to illustrate some new techniques.  But I think if you look around here a bit, you might find some inspiration to share with your cordwainer, and come back with something awesome to make us all envious of your "cheap Armenian shoemaker".

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fullb View Post


Thank you all.

The base leather was really great regarding colour and quality. I have polished them regularly with different safir cream colour. This is just the result after about 2 years of regular maintenance. I can say I like the result and I love to wear them.

 

I'm glad someone asked this.  I saw a similar tone on a new pair of Bestettis recently and was wondering how it was achieved.  Do you have any pictures of these when they first came to you?  I'd love to see a comparison.  They look magnificent.

post #16393 of 19138
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

I'm glad someone asked this.  I saw a similar tone on a new pair of Bestettis recently and was wondering how it was achieved.  Do you have any pictures of these when they first came to you?  I'd love to see a comparison.  They look magnificent.

I do

post #16394 of 19138

Thanks!

 

Wonderful as they are of course, but what you've done has taken them to another level.  Do you strip the polish down much, and are they darker colours you're applying in small amounts?  There is no detail about this that I would not want to know!

post #16395 of 19138
Similar to the EG Westwood. Vass "West" model in antiqued Cognac shell Cordovan.



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