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Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 1083

post #16231 of 19227
#8 tassels
argyles otc

post #16232 of 19227
A couple of green boxes waiting for my return home tonight
post #16233 of 19227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burton View Post

A couple of green boxes waiting for my return home tonight

nephew,
what did you acquire?
post #16234 of 19227
black tassels
argyles otc

post #16235 of 19227


Alden for J.Crew
post #16236 of 19227

^ Very nice!

post #16237 of 19227
A question for the shoe connaisseurs: will Zonkey Boot online shop have any sales soon? After a quick search on google, it seems there were some reductions in January.

I tried a pair of their suede boots last year in Munich and not knowing anything about the brand I could not justify paying 500+ euros for them. They were on a very modern last (sized like Santoni), waxed suede and super comfortable. Since then I've been wanting a pair. I ordered a few weeks ago this derby in suede, but still want some boots.

I know not everyone's fan of the antique waxed suede look, but in real life these look amazing




Others on the wishlist


post #16238 of 19227
C&J Ghillies for Barneys with the beautiful red Dainite soles having their first outing.




post #16239 of 19227
cigar tassels
argyles otc

post #16240 of 19227

I just came across this article: http://theagatineeyelet.wordpress.com/2010/11/22/welts-part-1/

 

Looking at the illustrations, I have a question regarding the stitch labeled 48. Alden shoes featuring a storm welt has this stitch, however it was my understanding this stitch was faux.

 

Could some of the more knowledgeable people shed some light on this stitch. C&J storm welted shoes does not feature this stitch.

post #16241 of 19227
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanskl View Post

I just came across this article: http://theagatineeyelet.wordpress.com/2010/11/22/welts-part-1/

Looking at the illustrations, I have a question regarding the stitch labeled 48. Alden shoes featuring a storm welt has this stitch, however it was my understanding this stitch was faux.

Could some of the more knowledgeable people shed some light on this stitch. C&J storm welted shoes does not feature this stitch.

which modern alden model with storm welt has that side stitch? The side stitch in that diagram is done sans storm welt. Labeled as a 1962 stitch is quite telling, as I have handled maybe a half dozen pairs of shoes with that construction... all made in the 1960's.

When a goodyear with a storm welt has the welt then stitched into the side of the shoe, it usually does not connect to anything and is for aesthetics only. Possible it is done to look similar to a goyser/ bentivegna style stitch where the welt is on the outside of the uppers and topsole (rather than in between).
post #16242 of 19227
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanskl View Post

Alden shoes featuring a storm welt has this stitch, however it was my understanding this stitch was faux.

Quote:
Originally Posted by isshinryu101 View Post

which modern alden model with storm welt has that side stitch? When a goodyear with a storm welt has the welt then stitched into the side of the shoe, it usually does not connect to anything and is for aesthetics only.

Unless Alden has changed production in the last few years. all Alden 'split-reverse' welts (English 'storm welt') have this stitch. Whether it is structural or just decorative, I cannot say without taking the shoe apart. An L-shaped welt (which is stictly speaking not a 'split-reverse' welt) has this row of stitching to connect welt to upper leather. A classic 'split-reverse' welt is split to half the thickness and half the depth; then the lower section is stitched in place, while the upper section forms a turned-up lip around the shoe.

Usually you can work out if a welt is stitched on the shoe, or has been stitched previously ('bon-welt). Where the welt is joined (presuming it is a 360 degree welt), if stitched on the shoe the stitches are overlapping by at least on stitch. If it is a previously stitched bon-welt, the welt is simply butted and the stitches do not continue through the cut.

In the case of Alden it is difficult to see, as at least the stitching connecting welt and sole are definitely stitched on the shoe. It gets a bit messy, where the welt is joined (on the inside heel), so I cannot see whether the upper row of stitching is cut or overlaps (and I've used a magnifying glass).

But on balance, I would guess the upper row is just decorative
post #16243 of 19227
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post



Unless Alden has changed production in the last few years. all Alden 'split-reverse' welts (English 'storm welt') have this stitch. Whether it is structural or just decorative, I cannot say without taking the shoe apart. An L-shaped welt (which is stictly speaking not a 'split-reverse' welt) has this row of stitching to connect welt to upper leather. A classic 'split-reverse' welt is split to half the thickness and half the depth; then the lower section is stitched in place, while the upper section forms a turned-up lip around the shoe.

Usually you can work out if a welt is stitched on the shoe, or has been stitched previously ('bon-welt). Where the welt is joined (presuming it is a 360 degree welt), if stitched on the shoe the stitches are overlapping by at least on stitch. If it is a previously stitched bon-welt, the welt is simply butted and the stitches do not continue through the cut.

In the case of Alden it is difficult to see, as at least the stitching connecting welt and sole are definitely stitched on the shoe. It gets a bit messy, where the welt is joined (on the inside heel), so I cannot see whether the upper row of stitching is cut or overlaps (and I've used a magnifying glass).

But on balance, I would guess the upper row is just decorative

 

I believe all of the Alden cases are decorative beyond question.  In fact, tugging at the "lip" of the split-reverse welt usually pulls it down enough to see the inside and reveal that the stitching goes nowhere. 

 

Bengal-stripe, I have used this thread:http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?80069-split-welt-vs-reverse-welt from AAAC (which you actually contributed to) as my source and answer to this question when I first came across it.  I walked away from that thread with the understanding that no Goodyear-welted shoes currently in production utilize a second row of stitching that is actually functional.  I don't recall the source, but I seem to remember reading that the stitching in the image from the original poster's question above was actually someone's attempt to improve the Goodyear-welted construction's "weakness" of using gemming.  The second row of stitching helped eliminate the potential for gemming failure, but it fell out of favor due to being inefficient and unnecessary.  I will see if I can find the source that I read that from.  Thoughts?

post #16244 of 19227
post #16245 of 19227

What is it with you and pythons?!  These are crazy; thanks for sharing! :)

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