or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II - Page 916

post #13726 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljrcustom View Post

Please let us know how they hold up in the bad weather. Thanks.
The pair of boots that I currently own, have commando soles. I cant find any new pairs of brown boots with with commando sole that I like. This is why I am considering dainite. Is dainite really that bad on snow and ice?
very true...

Dainite is awful.

For rubber to be as hard wearing and to last as long as leather, it needs to be quite dense, which unfortunately means they don't grip at all. Dainite has this disadvantage, but also doesn't have much traction. I find leather soles actually have more traction than dainite.

My advice is to get a boot with leather soles and have a cobbler install commando on them.
post #13727 of 19364
Today's shoe. 1950's Wingtip Oxfords.

IMG_0780.jpg

IMG_0787.jpg

IMG_0789.jpg
post #13728 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

Dainite is awful.
For rubber to be as hard wearing and to last as long as leather, it needs to be quite dense, which unfortunately means they don't grip at all. Dainite has this disadvantage, but also doesn't have much traction. I find leather soles actually have more traction than dainite.
My advice is to get a boot with leather soles and have a cobbler install commando on them.

I take it on that rationale that crepe is good for grip?
post #13729 of 19364
I dunno.

It's probably not the best logic.

I don't like crepe either.

YMMV
post #13730 of 19364
]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljrcustom View Post

I need to pick up a pair of those to replace an old pair that I have from to boot ny. Do expect them to wear well in snow and ice? Thanks.
-LR
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

dainite with snow&ice. welcome to the slippery slope party foo.gif

ol' fritzl sure do hate them Dainites. dozingoff.gif
post #13731 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

I dunno.
It's probably not the best logic.
I don't like crepe either.
YMMV

It's probably pretty practical but I don't think I've ever seen a nice crepe soled shoe (My sweeping statement for the week).

Case in point
post #13732 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalfordOfLondon View Post

Slightly boring...
C&J pebble grain chukkas on a dainite sole:
DSCF9447.JPG
DSCF9411.JPG
DSCF9412.JPG
DSCF9414.JPG
DSCF9449.JPG

 

Nothing boring about good shoes.  I have the "Grasmere" shoe with the same Dainite sole, and pebble grain (tan).  They're super hard-wearing, clean up nicely and very comfortable.  Also quite a generous fit I noticed.  Sometimes "understated" is the most stylish of all.  Actually, a lot of the time, come to think of it....!

post #13733 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcam8 View Post

]
ol' fritzl sure do hate them Dainites. dozingoff.gif

no, i don't hate dainite. it doesn't work on ice and snow. it's very good in rainy conditions, though. it's no rocket science.
post #13734 of 19364

 

 

These Havana Joes I've had for about five years, I'm planning to scrub down and recondition them. I'd like to know if there is a way I can restore some of the color in the faded spots on the sides, and the heavily scuffed spots on the toes before I do this. They're not expensive boots , so I'd rather do the work myself instead of taking them to the cobblers. Thanks in advance!

post #13735 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post

no, i don't hate dainite. it doesn't work on ice and snow. it's very good in rainy conditions, though. it's no rocket science.

Fritzl is 100% correct about this. Dainite is not a proper sole for ice and snow. I don't why this persists on SF. I suggest those that believe it is go out and wear it for a while. Make sure your insurance is up to date and have your doctor on hand. If you want a good sole for snow and ice go to the traditional Commando:

29.jpg

Dainite is very limited in its usefulness.
post #13736 of 19364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burton View Post

Fritzl is 100% correct about this. Dainite is not a proper sole for ice and snow. I don't why this persists on SF. I suggest those that believe it is go out and wear it for a while. Make sure your insurance is up to date and have your doctor on hand. If you want a good sole for snow and ice go to the traditional Commando:
29.jpg
Dainite is very limited in its usefulness.

+1. This is coming from someone who is very fond of Danite. It is actually quite slippery on ice and snow.

Not sure I agree that it is limited in utility though.
post #13737 of 19364
Now THIS is what to wear in the snow. Have had various iterations of these since I was in middle school.

52268.jpg
post #13738 of 19364
I thought Dainite would be great for wet weather, instead of leather...how wrong was I!!
Went out for dinner and it was raining..wearing my Tetbury's..let's just say I'm not going to be seen around that restaurant for a long time! LOL...actually in agony right now.
Dainite+water+cobbles/concrete/marble/granite = asking for pain!
post #13739 of 19364
Actually Dainite is a brand, like Vibram, and not a sole type.
Their 'studded' soles usually get referred to as Dainite soles which can be a bit confusing.
The company also makes the ridgeway sole wich is a lot more rugged and suitable for outdoor activities, snow and other nasty weather than their studded sole.


Their medway sole is not as rugged as the ridgeway but still more so than the studded sole.
post #13740 of 19364
Burton, I've tried Commando soles on snow and ice. Snow packs into the the soles and they become slippery, they are no help on ice. The only reliable sole options I've found are Ridgeway and Crepe, both hold well because the material is softer. Then there are Swims galoshes, they also work if one can accept the rubbery look.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II