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Unattractiveness and the discussion of style - Page 3

post #31 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by josepidal
Would you rather be an unkempt unattractive man, or a well-dressed unattractive man.

I'd much rather be an unstylish but good looking man. I can just hang out at the beach all day.
post #32 of 170
Quote:
Well, sometimes trolling (if that's really what it is, I'm not so sure) can actually lead to content

Important (well, fact):

A man can have a very ugly face, and not lose one single point in life for it, with the right attitude (brains, taste, charm, confidence, etc.).

*

Facial ugliness (which is what I suppose we're really discussing) isn't really that much of a big deal for men. Women with ugly faces suffer far more for it.


And another member's response was
Quote:
Being good-looking doesn't really matter for men anyway. It's completely unnecessary for a successful career, a full social life, or even success with women. None of my friends who are really successful in any of these areas are particularly good looking. And none of them pays much attention to clothes either. They're just smart, successful, normal, well-balanced people.




Please visit the company's website for the cold hard truth.

The articles don't discuss facial attractiveness in particular, because services are not surgical. Anyway, no research studies brought to the company's attention indicate significant differences in life outcomes between opposite-sex individuals with lifelong very low facial attractiveness. People like that almost always do badly. Anecdotally, that is one reason why they seldom bother to dress well.

Maybe another addition to make there is that, under normal circumstances, some men apparently don't notice how specifically physically attractive nearby men are.
post #33 of 170
I can't say its all about compensation for percieved ugliness. I don't get women and children running in fear as I walk down the street, but no modeling agents are calling either. I will say that alot of my interest has to do with the history, craftsmanship and aesthetics of clothing. the more I researched for my classes, the more interested i became. its more of an ongoing educational process.

However, the seersucker looks smashing up here in the drabness of the belltower!
post #34 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant
And another member's response was





Please visit the company's website for the cold hard truth.

The articles don't discuss facial attractiveness in particular, because services are not surgical. Anyway, no research studies brought to the company's attention indicate significant differences in life outcomes between opposite-sex individuals with lifelong very low facial attractiveness. People like that almost always do badly. Anecdotally, that is one reason why they seldom bother to dress well.

Maybe another addition to make there is that, under normal circumstances, some men apparently don't notice how specifically physically attractive nearby men are.

Pimpin' your company on Style Forum - Priceless
post #35 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by sygyzy
Pimpin' your company on Style Forum - Priceless
post #36 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
I can't say its all about compensation for percieved ugliness. I don't get women and children running in fear as I walk down the street, but no modeling agents are calling either. I will say that alot of my interest has to do with the history, craftsmanship and aesthetics of clothing. the more I researched for my classes, the more interested i became. its more of an ongoing educational process.

However, the seersucker looks smashing up here in the drabness of the belltower!

Damn you! LOL!
I was looking for a pic of Lon Cheaney myself, to show his attire in the Phantom of the Opera as an example of compensating for facial unattractiveness
post #37 of 170
As is often the case, this discussion is, in general, the middle-brow versus the high-brow and low-brow. Usually the middle-brow sets, preserves and inforces the rules of attractiveness, style and fashion. Often the low-brow is into streetware, etc and conspicuous consumption. Much of the time the high-brow does or doesn't follow the rules of the middle-brow or low-brow, but selects rules from each at their leasure and pleasure while making up their own rules.
post #38 of 170
Dude - I'm currently pulling a 7.8 ranking on hotornot.

Who you calling ugly!
post #39 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by thealbatross
I know that this will come to the offense of many here but I will post it nonetheless as I feel the statement has its merits. I have noticed by way or photos posted on the site that it seems the majority of the membership is what would be considered unattractive by normal social standards; I too consider myself to be a part of this group (unattractive that is), so I think it?s fair to voice such an observation. It?s interesting to consider the connection between this and the discussion of style. So a question arises: has your own style developed to compensate or empower your own shortcoming? I think mine has; in the beginning it was unconscious but over time I have become aware of the fact that I dress to somehow conquer certain insecurities, and am curious if other members here are aware of doing the same thing, and if so has it been effective? In my case I don?t think it has as I still spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about these issues.

Would you be so kind as to refer me to your tailor? The man must be a miracle worker: Imagine, being able to fit a suit to a jackass!
post #40 of 170
hmm, is it just me, or is the original poster getting a lot of undue flack....his wording wasnt offensive in any way, he just brought up a touchy subject.
post #41 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quirk
Being good-looking doesn't really matter for men anyway. It's completely unnecessary for a successful career, a full social life, or even success with women. None of my friends who are really successful in any of these areas are particularly good looking. And none of them pays much attention to clothes either. They're just smart, successful, normal, well-balanced people.
I have read that attractive people are more likely to get the job after an interview.
post #42 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
What about those of us with Mediterranean ancestry who have been "blessed" with a "unibrow"?

Find someone who can wax your eyebrows without making them look feminine. This can be difficult. Sometimes I get lazy. I hate having a unibrow

Edit: I forgot to mention that I am beautiful (my mom told me so).
post #43 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
The better you look the more you see.
You beat me to it.
post #44 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart
hmm, is it just me, or is the original poster getting a lot of undue flack....his wording wasnt offensive in any way, he just brought up a touchy subject.

Yea though it was phrased with a little more kindness, his premise boils down to this: I've seen your photos, and most of you are some plug ugly bastards.

Sometimes, you just keep it to yourself.
post #45 of 170
Thread Starter 
I apologize to anyone that I offended with my original post but I wanted to be as bluntly honest with the forum as I am with myself. While I understand that attractiveness is subjective I think society has defined it in general terms, although some of the details are certainly a matter of individual taste. As I said I don't consider myself to be attractive and with the same standard applied to the photos I have seen here I have come to a similar conclusion about the majority of the forum.

Not so long ago I made a foray into the whole online personal thing and one of the major complaints by both myself and the women I met was in fact that people didn't look as good as they did in their online photos, so I don't believe this defense although I sincerely would like to. Marc, while I have not been in attendance to any of the forum events, would you say that the people posting their photos for the most part represent those who attend these events? Do you in fact consider yourself attractive? I would be interested in meeting other forum members; perhaps they would have a better opinion of my facial appearance than I do, but I consider myself a realist--maybe this is part of my problem; as acute self-awareness doesn't help one's self-esteem.

Actually, self-awareness seems to be an integral part of the original point that I was trying to make. It seems in my personal experience that those who are insecure and unsure of their own attractiveness seem to compensate as I said, by way of their dress and reinforce this idea in the ensuing discussion of style. Certainly part of the appeal of buying a Kiton suit or a pair of John Lobbs is an apparent confidence boost that such a purchase delivers; even if it's only temporary.

I apologize for this rambling reply but it's been a long day.
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