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Aging and renewal--keeping a wardrobe fresh

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I saw this photo below (thanks, Sartorialist!) and thought the jacket represented a sophisticated combination of the updated and the classic. Specifically, the narrow lapels look contemporary yet the cloth is timeless. When I see this handsome example I can't help but think my jackets might be at risk of looking just a bit dated.

I'm interested in how others react to this look. Do some dismiss it outright as yet another example of the vagaries of fashion? Or, does an example like this spark an interest in acquiring something similar? I suddenly find myself drawn to this look, which differs from anything I've had. At what point do we stand up and take notice that things have changed and that the time has come for us to try something new?

I'd prefer to build on what I already have in my closet, rather than growing tired of it as the tailored clothing landscape shifts a 1/4 of an inch here or 1/2 an inch there. However, at some point clothing simply becomes dated in an unattractive way, suggesting that the wearer is out of touch and living in the mothballed past. We've all seen older men in clothes that were once wonderful examples of great style in the 70s or 80s. A wardrobe must go through a continual process of aging and renewal; but how quickly should that renewal occur? Even so, I'd like to think the suits and jackets that I've purchased over the past few years should remain fairly current for another 5 or so years.
LL
post #2 of 7
I think what helps is keeping a variety of clothes in one's closet (different shoulder shapes, lapel widths...) as opposed to engaging in the everlasting quest for the "perfect cut" and ending up with many suits that look the same and may look outdated at the same rate...

I personally find that this man tries hard to look younger by wearing "fashion forward" thin lapels. It just doesn't look his age, just like when a 60 year-old goes out in camo pants (JMO of course). A classic look is probably the best bet at that age...
post #3 of 7
Variety is the answer. At some point, a suit, sportscoat or tie needs to go to the back of the closet. Perhaps, after several years of being in the back of the closet it needs to go to the vintage shop. However, I have several 20+ years old Oxxford, for instance, that service as rainy day suits.
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203
I personally find that this man tries hard to look younger by wearing "fashion forward" thin lapels.


really? I wouldnt call those 'fashion foward thin lapels' at all (up to 2.5" usually). I'd guess they were about 3.5" wide. Those look like the perfect modern conservative lapel size. But then, I think that most normal sized lapels are waaay too wide, like airplane wings.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart
really? I wouldnt call those 'fashion foward thin lapels' at all (up to 2.5" usually). I'd guess they were about 3.5" wide. Those look like the perfect modern conservative lapel size. But then, I think that most normal sized lapels are waaay too wide, like airplane wings.

I may have eyesight problems then. To me, these look like they are about 1/3 of the shoulder width. Which in my book is quite thin. Then when you put them in the perspective of his pretty big head, they look even thinner.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart
really? I wouldnt call those 'fashion foward thin lapels' at all (up to 2.5" usually). I'd guess they were about 3.5" wide. Those look like the perfect modern conservative lapel size. But then, I think that most normal sized lapels are waaay too wide, like airplane wings.
Agreed. Those lapels are barely thinner than those on several Zegna Taglio Exclusivos (their MTM program at the time) my father had made in the early 1980s, that I still wear all the time. I think the guy has a great "power" look for someone of his age, and I love the barely-there pocket square, though collar gaps are one of my personal pet peeves.
post #7 of 7
I will wear something until it starts to look dated, then I might continue to wear the item in less important situations for a while. But at that time I will have my eye out to replace the item if I think it's still a color or weight that I need. I think older people get tired of fashion and they start giving more serious thought to their retiremant funds etc.
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