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Reweaving

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Recently discovered two moth holes in a relatively new suit. It's a very nice looking, quality suit and I am hoping to salvage it if it makes economic sense (paid about $750 for the suit). It is a light gray pinstripe.

Is reweaving a viable, economical option? The holes are very small and there is one on the leg and between the zipper and front pocket on the pants and on the front of the jacket.

Any insight would be appreciated (how much will it cost, will it look "repaired", etc.).

Thanks
post #2 of 27
I had a tear in a pair of pants rewoven for about $80.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post
I had a tear in a pair of pants rewoven for about $80.

Thanks. Is the repair visible or does it look "new"?
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwB411 View Post
Thanks. Is the repair visible or does it look "new"?
It's not noticeable at all.
post #5 of 27
In my experience, a lot will depend on the suit fabric and whether or not there is a pattern. I've had, for example, a solid tan MTM suit from Brooks made from 130s VBC that suffered a couple of small moth holes. While the reweaving was done by what is apparently one of the best in Chicago, the repair is still slightly noticeable. A flannel with a bit more texture or a fabric where there is more of a pattern to distract the eye may both make the reweaving process more successful/less noticeable.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by PITAronin View Post
In my experience, a lot will depend on the suit fabric and whether or not there is a pattern. I've had, for example, a solid tan MTM suit from Brooks made from 130s VBC that suffered a couple of small moth holes. While the reweaving was done by what is apparently one of the best in Chicago, the repair is still slightly noticeable. A flannel with a bit more texture or a fabric where there is more of a pattern to distract the eye may both make the reweaving process more successful/less noticeable.
My pants were pinstriped, and also rewoven in Chicago, but I don't know where specifically.
post #7 of 27
Probably at Without a Trace at 100 E Walton Street which is apparently a reweaving place known around the country due to GQ or Esquire running an article on them. They're really the only place to go to in Chicago.
post #8 of 27
post #9 of 27
Last I heard, Alice was no longer working. This is as good a time as any to ask if anyone knows another reweaver in NYC.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Last I heard, Alice was no longer working. This is as good a time as any to ask if anyone knows another reweaver in NYC.

I think she stopped reweaving because she died, I'll let you know if that's changed. There is French American reweaving in the city.
post #11 of 27
If she died it's a very recent tragedy, because I was just there and she was plenty sprightly.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montauk View Post
If she died it's a very recent tragedy, because I was just there and she was plenty sprightly.

I was actually making a bad movie joke (Top Secret) but this post claims she is deceased:

http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...&postcount=451
post #13 of 27
I neeed a reweaver for a bunch of cashmere sweaters that were killed by moths.
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
I was actually making a bad movie joke (Top Secret) but this post claims she is deceased:

http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...&postcount=451

Hmm. I suppose it could always be a different old lady operating under Alice's shingle and with her phone line ;-)

In any case, she gives great reweave.
post #15 of 27
http://www.bestweavingandmending.com/
these people have done some work for me in the past
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