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Punch Resistance

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
Anyone know the science behind this? Boxers can take punishment from combos from hard hitters like Tyson, Hearns, etc, but why do so many people get dropped by one hit out on the streets? Those random people can't hit as hard as guys who get paid to beat people up for a living.
post #2 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyCooN View Post
Anyone know the science behind this? Boxers can take punishment from combos from hard hitters like Tyson, Hearns, etc, but why do so many people get dropped by one hit out on the streets? Those random people can't hit as hard as guys who get paid to beat people up for a living.

The obvious answer is defensive training and conditioning - there's a big difference between a boxer anticipating a punch and reacting defensively and some Joe Average on the street with zero reflexes who pretty much just stands there and absorbs the full impact of a punch. Ouch.

As to "punch resistance" (which is the measure by which a fighter avoids a KO), there are three factors:
i. Thickness of skull - this is genetic, obviously
ii. Neck strength: A KO is caused by a blow which causes the brain to bounce around (it's suspended in a fluid matrix), bruising the surface. A stronger neck can act literally as a shock absorbed for the head, so that less force is transmitted to the brain (hence less rattling around in the skull).
iii. Dehydration: Boxers dehydrate to hit their weight class, and dehydration reduces the level of fluid in the skull; less fluid - less brain-bounce = fewer KOs. Obviously, dehydration carries its own risk, but it does enhance punch resistance.

DH
post #3 of 59
padded gloves?
post #4 of 59
There is something to be said for being in a ring, knowing your going to get hit (being prepared for it), and knowing what it's generally going to feel like.

That said, I've also seen plenty of boxers in golden gloves matches get a hard, direct hit and basically have the fight be over. Most of the time boxers are covered, moving, and absorbing the forces coming in from a punch. Majority of people on the street aren't doing these things.


Also: You'd be suprised how hard a random person can hit with one punch and their entire body behind it, especially a fairly big guy. However, their ability to actually do it over and over again while keeping a defensive posture is severely lacking.
post #5 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by theyare View Post
padded gloves?


padded gloves are really just there to protect your hands, not your opponent

they may reduce lbs per sq/inch but i doubt it makes a difference in the sport
post #6 of 59
Training to get hit helps the body to get used to getting hit. After the first three months of Muay Thai training or boxing or whatever the body gets used to being hit.

It hurt like hell for the first couple of months of sparring but I got used to it after a while. The body adjusts.
post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 View Post
Training to get hit helps the body to get used to getting hit. After the first three months of Muay Thai training or boxing or whatever the body gets used to being hit.

It hurt like hell for the first couple of months of sparring but I got used to it after a while. The body adjusts.

Conditioning and movement. Also, no Jagermeister in the system of the knocked out guy!
post #8 of 59
i would probably build up some physical resistance via muscular development to the neck since I have heard a knockout is sudden energy exerted onto the brain stem in a way that literally shuts off your consciousness
post #9 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyCooN View Post
Anyone know the science behind this? Boxers can take punishment from combos from hard hitters like Tyson, Hearns, etc, but why do so many people get dropped by one hit out on the streets? Those random people can't hit as hard as guys who get paid to beat people up for a living.

KO resistance or simple punch resistance? The first "fight" I ever got in to I hardly felt more than impact when I was hit for the most part. The exceptions were my nose and ear (the later of which hurt like a bitch). 8-10 minutes after the fight was when it started to hurt. It was the same in boxing. When adrenaline is pounding through you, only certain really sensitive spots (I've been told that the legs feel it from a buddy of mine who kick boxes) feel the same sting that you do when you're hit in other circumstances.

KO resistance can be built with neck strength, but the boxing coach said that it was one of those things that you either had or you didn't, and that there wasn't much that could be done for it. I haven't seen to many knockouts in boxing though, and most of those that I have were by the time the guy was so exhausted that he could hardly stand anyway.
post #10 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iampeter View Post
padded gloves are really just there to protect your hands, not your opponent

they may reduce lbs per sq/inch but i doubt it makes a difference in the sport

Actually, padded gloves do a lot. The impact is absorbed over a larger area. You just don't get the same sudden jarring that you get when you get hit with a bare fist or a light (MMA style = 4 ounce) glove, although the total energy absorbed is the same. This is one of the reasons brain stem KOs happen in MMA so much more than in boxing.

Of course, over time, those repeated shots really take it out of you, which is why MMA is often considered much less damaging to the brain than boxing. Having competed in both MMA and kickboxing, I'd agree with the assessment.

And yeah, a fairly big guy can still hit, even if he has no training. His form, etc... will be completely off - he will probably load up his right and then drop it to swing from his hips, but if he catches you... ouch...
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
Actually, padded gloves do a lot. The impact is absorbed over a larger area. You just don't get the same sudden jarring that you get when you get hit with a bare fist or a light (MMA style = 4 ounce) glove, although the total energy absorbed is the same. This is one of the reasons brain stem KOs happen in MMA so much more than in boxing.

Of course, over time, those repeated shots really take it out of you, which is why MMA is often considered much less damaging to the brain than boxing. Having competed in both MMA and kickboxing, I'd agree with the assessment.

And yeah, a fairly big guy can still hit, even if he has no training. His form, etc... will be completely off - he will probably load up his right and then drop it to swing from his hips, but if he catches you... ouch...

I like to swing from the hips. It makes it that much easier to hit your opponent in the 'nads. JYT taught me that one!
post #12 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HgaleK View Post
The first "fight" I ever got in to I hardly felt more than impact when I was hit for the most part. The exceptions were my nose and ear (the later of which hurt like a bitch). 8-10 minutes after the fight was when it started to hurt.
For sure bro. I've been hit in the eyes, head, and nose in school fights but I didn't feel the bruises until a few days later. The first real punch that actually snapped my head was a leaping right hook while sparring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HgaleK View Post
KO resistance can be built with neck strength, but the boxing coach said that it was one of those things that you either had or you didn't, and that there wasn't much that could be done for it. I haven't seen to many knockouts in boxing though, and most of those that I have were by the time the guy was so exhausted that he could hardly stand anyway.
There's an example. Fast forward to 0:22. His legs give with that left hook.
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post #13 of 59
its pretty much knowing that youre going to get hit. as the saying goes, its the one you didnt see coming. thats what generally knocks out boxers and people in the street. obviously being hit many times and practicing helps when taking a punch. as was said above someones "chin" has a huge deal to do with it. some people are extremely hard to knock out, and some people have glass chins. ive only ever been knocked down once in boxing, (knock on wood) and that was with a straight shot to the solar plexus. its funny how you can still try to stay up and man up when hit with a good shot to the head, but a good shot to the body and youre paralyzed. no matter how much heart, or will etc the person is going down.
post #14 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by West24 View Post
its pretty much knowing that youre going to get hit. as the saying goes, its the one you didnt see coming. thats what generally knocks out boxers and people in the street. obviously being hit many times and practicing helps when taking a punch. as was said above someones "chin" has a huge deal to do with it. some people are extremely hard to knock out, and some people have glass chins. ive only ever been knocked down once in boxing, (knock on wood) and that was with a straight shot to the solar plexus. its funny how you can still try to stay up and man up when hit with a good shot to the head, but a good shot to the body and youre paralyzed. no matter how much heart, or will etc the person is going down.
This is true. Worse place to get hit is the liver.
post #15 of 59
Agreed. I only spar but the closest I ever went to going down was a hard hook to the midsection. My legs instantly turned to jello and all my energy was zapped out of me.
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